28

You don't want water-retaining soil sitting against the building because this causes damp problems. Creating a porous soakaway like this will mean any water sinks to a lower level than would cause any harm to the building.


14

Perhaps I missed something in the other answers. The one and only reason is because of SPLASHING. Rain over the gutter, a hard sideways rain will splash mud/soil onto the siding. Not good for siding as the mud tends to hold moisture too long and can cause rot as well as a dirty 'skirt' on your siding. The gravel, drain rock, cobble or even the lava ...


9

My guesses are that it just looks a lot neater and also prevents weeds from growing near the foundation. If weeds and their roots are allowed to grow there you would have to be constantly digging them out, and roots are already hard enough to get out of the ground without having to dig near or under that area. Another reason, I think, would be because it is ...


8

I always liked 2' x 2' concrete paving slabs as they are reusable. A piece of plywood, even on top of gravel will be worse for wear after any really wet period. They are a bit tricky to get perfectly level unless you compact the gravel underneath first. Paving slabs will drain water but any leakage inside will sit on plywood or be absorbed


5

You can definitely grow grass right up to the foundation - it won't harm your house in any way. That said, there are a few reasons you might not want to do this. First, your mower is unlikely to be able to get the grass right next to the foundation, which means you'll need to take a trimmer around the house every time you mow to get a nice, clean look. ...


3

I'd be uncomfortable about a tree that close to the house unless I knew precisely which variety it was and it was a small tree, say no more than 4 metres tall with a similar spread. Even that means branches may later scrape against the upper parts of the house though. I note that the tree is tending to lean away from the house already, in an attempt to head ...


3

You'll need a minimum of 4" of crushed limestone; for a wall of that height I'd probably use 6" just to be safe. Most people like using washed limestone as a foundation as opposed to "base" since it has no "fines" and won't settle as much. Usually the limestone is put on top of a landscape fabric to prevent soil infiltration and settling. The foundation is ...


2

Super question, T.! And I am so impressed you've got an inspector and have not purchased this home yet. This is a great way to get a better deal AND get the owner who is very interested to sell to FIX THIS before you have to deal with, well, truly a deal breaker. Did your inspector look at the supporting lumber for dry rot? Wet rot, grins? This garage, ...


2

You most certainly can lay you sod right up to the foundation. The reason people talk about foundation planting with shrubs is to have a transition between the home and your yard. Those foundation plantings are usually too narrow and too simple to do much for aesthetics/composition anyway. What you are trying to do right now is the simplest thing you ...


2

There might be two or perhaps three different principles at work here. First and most important is that surface water needs a clear escape path away from the house otherwise it ends up in the basement. So principle one is to slope the land away from the foundation. Second principle is to have the soil at the correct level with respect to the foundation ...


1

The roots of Trachelospermum are unlikely to damage house foundations, but planting a minimum of a foot away from a wall (whether its a house wall or garden wall or even a fence) is recommended practice for a couple of other reasons apart from air flow and possible foundation damage. First, rain shadow - this refers to the fact that something planted right ...


1

No remove this tree immiediately the roots will destroy your footings in years to come, not to mention constantly clogging your drains and busting your water pipes. No gum tree should be planted within 100 metres of a house.


1

Eucalyptus gunnii is a very large and fast growing tree if left unpruned; some of the other varieties don't get quite so large, but really, no eucalyptus should be planted with 40 or 50 feet (12.5 to 15 metres) of a building, because yes, it could affect foundations. Not to mention the mess it makes when larger with all the peeling scrolls of bark dropping ...


1

Some jurisdictions require non combustible mulch i.e. gravel next to the structures. Several buildings have had fires started from discarded smoking materials in combustible mulch.


1

A few things to consider: Depending on where you live, the boxwood you plant may be susceptible to boxwood blight. Right now, this is most prevalent in the US in the New England and down the east coast. I'm assuming that it will be making its way along the northern tier of states. I'm assuming that you want boxwood because it's an evergreen and easy to trim....


1

Ok...where is it that you live, what is the USDA zone? Have you ever used a greenhouse? Will it be heated and if so how? I had a polytunnel greenhouse until this last winter when we got tons of snow. Completely collapsed the greenhouse. Had a couple of mild winters so got lulled into complacency, sigh. We are doing a better and more permanent greenhouse ...


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