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1

I recommend that you plant at least part of the area with rain garden plants. These are plants that thrive in poorly drained areas. The Rain Garden Alliance is an excellent source to help you get started. It also contains a list of possible plants for you to use. The Alliance is US-based, I think, but many of the plants listed should be available in the UK. ...


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Although the soil seems wet now, even planting a few herbaceous plants will quickly dry out the soil. TLDR: Start with a tomatoes or grapes. Ferns are also pretty apt. Don't use a lot of mulch, half an inch at best. I wouldn't say no mulch because mulch helps with weed suppression. Soil amendments: Don't use pinebark. Gypsum can help if you have clay soil. ...


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Dig them up completely and separate the dead from the living. Divide the living plants and replant them. Lavender is very forgiving. Pruning the dead stuff is really the way to go in the future. Once in the fall after they are done blooming, cut them back on top about 1/3 down in a half globe shape. If you have them planted under the eave in the back of a ...


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Unless you have a dog that likes to eat plants (some do, I've been told) or raise sheep, goats, or cows, then I wouldn't worry about the plants - just don't eat any parts of them. C. ambigua is sometimes considered a medicinal herb, as it has been used externally as a lice killer, and L. perennis has been known to kill sheep. Lupinus polyphylla is another ...


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I would give them some monopotassium phosphate, in the soil. Phosphorus seemed to help an indoor pepper I had that was in a similar situation. I have a feeling that calcium nitrate might help, too, as it's supposed to boost production, and calcium strengthens plants. I'm recommending this along with (not instead of) the monopotassium phosphate. Calcium ...


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They're cannas. This is actually a near-duplicate of this question. Cannas have very large rhizomes which, in the Northern US, are dug every fall, stored over the winter indoors, and then planted out in the spring. You would use this same method in a pot, but make sure that the pot is large enough! I would estimate that a seven-gallon pot is the minimum size ...


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That's a phaelenopsis orchid. It's not growing from the trunk. If the plant is in a garden, then the roots have probably been attached to the trunk to mimic the way in which it grows in the wild. If not, then they probably look something like this.


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Raised beds, used bathtub, shoes, used tyres, vertical planters, etc. I suppose the list can be endless, there is always a plant you can grow in any container or space small/big. I agree with others suggestions here, take time to think through at this stage to save the disappointment or time (>10fold) later. May be you should be giving an option such as ...


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You could plant clematis and let it climb those trees and the corner will look beautiful once the climber is big and covering the trees and in full bloom. Also plant daffodils/tulips or any bulbs.


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I have been wanting to compare garden plants locally too - good luck with this. People don't have to use the extra options, or even see them, but it is good to have them incorporated in the database at the start. I wish to have: hours of sun at time or reporting whether the sun is morning or afternoon (some plants killed by summer arvo sun) if growing near a ...


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At some point in the future I think you will find that your categories are too broadly defined as collections of even more basic categories. One of the fundamentals of database design is to reduce things to their essentials. This leaves room for distinguishing one category from another and also (which addresses your question) creating new compound categories ...


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