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You are not alone in failing to make a note of the varietal name of plants you put in! I asked because, if its a recently created rose, a newer variety, these sometimes don't hold the features they were sold as having, often reverting to a single form, or even a different shade of flower colour (peach to pink for instance). The other possibility is that the ...


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It may slow production of the tubers to have them bloom but it’s NOT significant enough to make a huge difference. Plus, you may be able to ‘discover’ a new cultivar! My reference is 35 years of plants/greenhouse/landscaping/zoo & botanical garden work etc. Here’s a link to a reliable source as well.... https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/...


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This one is called Cardamine pratensis (Cuckoo Flower). Significant features are the pinnate leaf, small leaflets with entire edges, colour (can be pink or white) and the blooming time. The wiki page has a good closeup of the flower, so to check this ID you could compare the flower parts to your plants to see if they match up.


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This looks like orange Gerbera daisies (Asteraceae). They originate from South Africa, and like full sun. Advice is to water it in the morning, so the leaves can dry because they are sensitive to fungal infection. Here I found some more detailed care instructions.


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When grown outdoors, mangoes are pollinated via insects and air movement (wind); indoors, none of that takes place, so shaking the plant when the flowers open to try to release the pollen so that it reaches the female flowers increases the chance of fruits forming. Further info here https://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-baby-mangoes-indoors-94188.html


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That's Creeping Charlie, an extremely invasive groundcover that is considered a noxious weed in many states. It's actually not very good at preventing weed growth (the primary reason for a groundcover, IMO) because its growth is too open and fails to keep weed seeds from hitting the ground; it also doesn't prevent sunlight from hitting the ground. ...


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It sounds like a watering issue and it's possible its time indoors meant it needed hardening off before being planted outdoors, especially if the plant was not fully exposed to the outdoors prior to your being given it. Hydrangeas are sometimes sold in flower to be used as a temporary houseplant, which means they will have been grown under 'hothouse' ...


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You can cut it back; from your description, your clematis is a prune group 2 one, where the plant is usually just tidied up a bit in spring by removing any dead or unwanted growth rather than a full cutting back. You will lose the larger, earlier flowers by cutting back hard now, but the later, smaller flowers will still arrive later on in summer. Be sure ...


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It doesn't look too bad at all, it's definitely not dead - I wouldn't cut it back though, every time I've cut mine back in spring,they just up and die on me. Just give it some time.. we've got rain coming in the south and west of the UK, not sure if that includes Dublin, but you may not need to continue giving it water as the warm dry spell is about to ...


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That's a Puschkin (one of my favorite spring bulbs). They've moved around within the botanical community and are now classified as Puschkinia scilloides. They're related to the true blue Scilla sibirica - Siberian Squills, which you may be familiar with. Here's a photo to confirm. Squirrels tend to move my bulbs around and they can appear many dozens of feet....


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