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13

This is a cynoglossum, probably Cynoglossum amabile (Chinese Forget-me-not). There is also a species native to North Carolina (Cynoglossum virginianum). The native wildflower would make more sense for the ID, but that species has flowers that are a lighter blue, and its leaves are wider at the base. Note that the pictured flower could be a cultivar of either ...


8

Camelia Japonica, very happy in zone 8, there are hundreds of varieties ,colors white to pink to red, some with spotted coloring. The flowers look small, but correct color multiple petals for "Debutante". There is a very small chance it is a Camelia susanqua with very large flowers. Japonicas will bloom from the first of December until March in ...


5

It's a dianthus; its wide green leaves indicate that it's probably a cultivar of Dianthus chinensis. These plants like cool weather and usually bloom in the spring in my area of the US - looks like you're living in a region with a mild winter, which means it will be a (possibly short-lived) perennial where you live. The flowers may smell sweetly of cloves.


5

At some point in the future I think you will find that your categories are too broadly defined as collections of even more basic categories. One of the fundamentals of database design is to reduce things to their essentials. This leaves room for distinguishing one category from another and also (which addresses your question) creating new compound categories ...


5

That’s an Arisaema tortuosum, a whipcord cobra lily, fittingly named for the very elongated spadix. While in many cobra lilies the spathe, the tube-petal-like part around the spadix, takes the show, here the unusually long spadix -which carries the actual flowers - is eye-catching.


4

I think a good strategy for you would be to forget about sowing seeds directly into the gravel but instead sowing them into containers. You could also create a raised bed either directly on the gravel strip or slightly raised above it. Containers would also allow you some flexibility in your plantings by, for example, allowing you to, say, plant a cold-...


4

This is a nice plant with typical flowers and is called hardy white gloxinia (Sinningia tubiflora). It has tubers, and can handle short periods of frost in winter. It is related to African violets and cape primrose (ref.).


3

Sounds like a perfect place for cacti. Cactus plants love sunshine all day, a north facing window in your country is ideal. They also give beautiful flowers in spring.


3

Common name is flowering flax, scientific name: Linum grandiflorum. It's an annual, and not native to the UK (but originates from North Africa). It can be found in British gardens, though, see Gardener's world webpage.


2

I think you're feeding too much nitrogen. Excess nitrogen can express itself as flower drop in chiles. I'd recommend stopping the 20/20/20 for a bit and then starting something much lighter like a 5/3/3.


2

Maybe. It is very difficult to get enough artificial light to grow plants to maturity. Most of the ad looks like advertising ( no surprise). A very important number is lumens , the amount of light, not given . A temperature spectrum ( ad - 2900 K) only applies to incandescent lights and halogen and metal halide ( as I understand it) . You want the frequency ...


2

That's a phaelenopsis orchid. It's not growing from the trunk. If the plant is in a garden, then the roots have probably been attached to the trunk to mimic the way in which it grows in the wild. If not, then they probably look something like this.


2

They're cannas. This is actually a near-duplicate of this question. Cannas have very large rhizomes which, in the Northern US, are dug every fall, stored over the winter indoors, and then planted out in the spring. You would use this same method in a pot, but make sure that the pot is large enough! I would estimate that a seven-gallon pot is the minimum size ...


2

Raised beds, used bathtub, shoes, used tyres, vertical planters, etc. I suppose the list can be endless, there is always a plant you can grow in any container or space small/big. I agree with others suggestions here, take time to think through at this stage to save the disappointment or time (>10fold) later. May be you should be giving an option such as ...


2

I have been wanting to compare garden plants locally too - good luck with this. People don't have to use the extra options, or even see them, but it is good to have them incorporated in the database at the start. I wish to have: hours of sun at time or reporting whether the sun is morning or afternoon (some plants killed by summer arvo sun) if growing near a ...


2

Dig them up completely and separate the dead from the living. Divide the living plants and replant them. Lavender is very forgiving. Pruning the dead stuff is really the way to go in the future. Once in the fall after they are done blooming, cut them back on top about 1/3 down in a half globe shape. If you have them planted under the eave in the back of a ...


2

The green parts of that plant are dead. Only time will tell if the roots have enough energy reserves to regrow, but it's not likely. A perennial that has its top killed by frost may regrow from the roots, but annuals usually don't have the stored reserves to allow regrowth. I would leave the top until it dries out, then remove it by breaking or trimming it ...


2

Violets, there may also be some white ones around. Here in zone 8 they are invasive except the deer like them and keep the violets under control. If you are looking for purple early blooming ,hardy plants ,look at ajuga.


2

It is Hydrangea macrophylla, one of the lace cap varieties rather than a 'mophead' type. They are deciduous and prefer partial or dappled shade in soil that does not dry out frequently, and need plenty of space because, as you mention, they get rather large over time. They should not be hard pruned or pruned at all if possible, with only dead wood removed in ...


2

Looks to me like Centranthus ruber (aka red valerian). If it likes you, it will self-seed, sometimes to the extent to become a nuisance. More information here.


2

Yes, that's a rhododendron. Yup.


2

Looks like a rhododendron to me, they grow all over NC. If the leaves are thicker/stiffer/tougher than most tree leaves I would be almost positive. To me, the leaves feel fake, like they are polyester. It's a great plant, one of my favorites. When I was backpacking the Smokies they grew ubiquitously in the valleys. Enjoy it and don't be afraid to trim it or ...


2

Looks like a Ligustrum variety, commonly known as privet, possibly japanese privet, Ligustrum japonicum. These bear fragrant (some people would say unpleasant smelling) white sprays/panicles of small flowers in late summer or fall, sometimes followed by berries, so it rather depends on whether that flower description fits the flowers you see. https://www.rhs....


2

According to the Florida Native Plant Society, Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis) is native to zone 9b (according to the USDA, it's native to Polk County, which is zone 10a). If you're adventurous, you could try it in your 10a climate. If you're in the US, it will be a very inexpensive plant because it is very easy to propagate. Cardinal Flower is a true ...


2

They look like spittlebugs. They produce a bubbly spit-like substance around themselves for protection from heat, predators, etc. Your reply to me question seems to confirm this. Apparently, they can be plant-sucking pests, but I've only seen them on rare occasions in small numbers before (mostly in my childhood on giant garden weeds), and the plants didn't ...


2

How deep is the growing medium on the roof? What is the growing medium? It's important to note that green roofs in the US are engineered, with specific layers of different media to ensure proper drainage. I assume that that is also the case in the EU. The fact that you have plants already growing on the roof is very encouraging - it looks as if someone has ...


2

Common name is Apple-of-Peru, botanical name is Nicandra physalodes. It is a member of the Nightshade family, and as the name suggests already it is native to South America. It is introduced in many parts of the world including Europe. If you want to propagate it, try to collect seeds.


1

Why not perennializing some daffodil, or other spring flowering bulb around its feet, to at least give you some action when it’s bare or cut back? A white variety might be handsome. Good luck!


1

The link you provided seems to say there are 3 separate plants - Buddleia tricolor is available as one plant with 3 different coloured blooms on it, so I'm not certain whether you will receive 3 plants in one pot which effectively act as a single plant because they may be impossible to separate at the roots anyway. Either way, this is a Buddleia davidii ...


1

I recommend that you plant at least part of the area with rain garden plants. These are plants that thrive in poorly drained areas. The Rain Garden Alliance is an excellent source to help you get started. It also contains a list of possible plants for you to use. The Alliance is US-based, I think, but many of the plants listed should be available in the UK. ...


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