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11

It is a passion flower, but it's not Passiflora incarnata; your photo shows Passiflora caerulea. The rays on the first variety are wavy or crimped, whereas the second has generally straight but slightly curved rays, like those in your photo. P. caerulea is not quite so hardy as P. incarnata and may be killed back to the ground in a hard winter (temps below -...


5

This one is called Cardamine pratensis (Cuckoo Flower). Significant features are the pinnate leaf, small leaflets with entire edges, colour (can be pink or white) and the blooming time. The wiki page has a good closeup of the flower, so to check this ID you could compare the flower parts to your plants to see if they match up.


3

Your plant is Cyclamen persicum, also known as florist cyclamen. Yours isn't looking too healthy judging by the foliage, but perhaps it coming up for dormancy - they tend to flower during winter and early spring, then die down and return later on. There are other types of cyclamen which can be grown outdoors, but this one is really a houseplant, and won't ...


3

This looks like orange Gerbera daisies (Asteraceae). They originate from South Africa, and like full sun. Advice is to water it in the morning, so the leaves can dry because they are sensitive to fungal infection. Here I found some more detailed care instructions.


3

That's Creeping Charlie, an extremely invasive groundcover that is considered a noxious weed in many states. It's actually not very good at preventing weed growth (the primary reason for a groundcover, IMO) because its growth is too open and fails to keep weed seeds from hitting the ground; it also doesn't prevent sunlight from hitting the ground. ...


3

Celosia are half hardy annuals in the UK; they can be planted outdoors as part of a summer bedding scheme, but they are frost sensitive and need hardening off prior to planting out; they need a warm and sheltered spot. They can also be kept as temporary, short lived houseplants; indoors in coolish temperatures (around 15-20 degC) they will flower for a ...


3

No need to worry. That’s a tuberous begonia - and it’s just too small to flower yet. Unlike the spring bulbs you may be more familiar with, these begonias have tubers that can go dormant (what you bought) and regrow again in spring and will flower when they are grown into good-sized plants. Take good care of it and expect flowers in a few weeks.


3

Your bright flower is a variety of Sulfur Cosmos, Cosmos sulphureus! They range originally from Southern North America through Northern South America, and have spread to regions all over the world! They are known for attracting butterflies, and have been extensively planted in some regions. There are also different varieties, including some with orange or ...


3

I don't think it's a climbing rose, its growth habit suggests it's not, combined with the major flush of smaller flowers, with a lesser, ongoing display; these features are not typical of climbing roses. I was wondering about a rambling rose, which fits with the major flush of flowers, again not huge blooms but masses of them, and with sporadic flowers later,...


2

I can't see any reason why it would with an amaryllis or any other flower. Lilies, though, will last slightly longer if the pollen is carefully removed because the pollen falls easily and can cause damage to the flower and therefore shorten the bloom's life, but it's not necessary to remove the stamens or pistil. Lilies and Amaryllis do not belong to the ...


2

As Kid mentioned plants grow towards the light. For this reason, make sure you turn your pot weekly a 1/4 or 1/2 turn. This will provide you plant equal light on all sides. I would suggest starting with a taller stake, rather than putting more soil in the pot. More soil means more moisture. Longer it takes for your plant to dry out. But, yes you ...


2

-->Usually plants propagates in the direction of sunlight. if there is no equal distribution of light on the plant this might be one of the reason. --> you might be watering plant from one side of the plant so plants leans towards wet side.


2

Your plant is a Phaleonopsis (common name moth orchid) and it's one of the very few easy care orchids. It needs bright light, but no direct sunlight; they do well on windowsills. They do not need a lot of water because they are epiphytes, so just give a little once or maybe twice a week if your home is very hot, less if it's cooler. Repotting can be done, ...


2

Assuming that the plant is no more than 12 inches/30cm tall (and most likely shorter than that), then this is a common garden hyacinth, but one that's been in the ground awhile and has lost its compact growth habit. A photo from farther away would be helpful in this ID. I first thought we were looking at English or Spanish Bluebells (Hyacinthoides species), ...


2

That's a Puschkin (one of my favorite spring bulbs). They've moved around within the botanical community and are now classified as Puschkinia scilloides. They're related to the true blue Scilla sibirica - Siberian Squills, which you may be familiar with. Here's a photo to confirm. Squirrels tend to move my bulbs around and they can appear many dozens of feet....


2

The problem is you are watering them every day. You should only water plants when they need watering, not on any kind of schedule. As a general rule, you should water plants when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch. You have to be extra careful with seedlings because excess moisture can often cause damping off disease. Damping off disease is a fungus ...


2

It is Alpinia purpurata, commonly known as Red Ginger or Ostrich Plume, but it is not an edible form of ginger. Propagation is usually done by dividing the rhizomes or bulbs, but you can also use leafy offshoots and plant those, see here https://www.backyardnature.net/yucatan/red-ging.htm


2

This looks like a bellflower (campanula). Of course this is a rather huge genus, but a more precise ID would require a better photo(s), showing more details like leaves, flower details and overall size and shape.


2

Depending on its size,(fairly small) I'd say campanula rotundifolia, commonly know in Britain as harebell, found throughout Europe, from the Mediterranean to the Arctic.


2

I thnk the basic problem is that they are much too crowded together, so they are growing to try to get more light. Even small flowering plants need to be 8 or 12 inches apart to develop normally to their full size. If you sowed the seeds straight into the container, you need to sow more seeds than that since they won't all germinate, and then thin out the ...


2

That appears to be Tithonia rotundifolia, also known as Mexican Sunflower. Note the rounded petals and similar leaves to your plant on this photo. It's an annual in non-tropical areas but has naturalized in areas with warm winters. The species can reach the heights you've described, while the 'Torch' cultivar is smaller at only 1m or so in height and width. ...


1

They look generally healthy; I think the browning flower was probably coming to the end of its bloom time, when they will gradually brown and fall off. Browning buds may mean they need watering daily, especially if they get a few hours sun in the mornings and the sun is hot (even if the air temperature is reasonably cool); Fuchsias prefer partial or dappled ...


1

It doesn't look too bad at all, it's definitely not dead - I wouldn't cut it back though, every time I've cut mine back in spring,they just up and die on me. Just give it some time.. we've got rain coming in the south and west of the UK, not sure if that includes Dublin, but you may not need to continue giving it water as the warm dry spell is about to ...


1

When grown outdoors, mangoes are pollinated via insects and air movement (wind); indoors, none of that takes place, so shaking the plant when the flowers open to try to release the pollen so that it reaches the female flowers increases the chance of fruits forming. Further info here https://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-baby-mangoes-indoors-94188.html


1

I have many azaleas and never saw damage like that . Possibly lack of water. However, azaleas love acid soil and your concrete planters imply alkaline soil. Checking soil pH would not be a bad idea. What I do is take a soil sample ,mix it in distilled water , and let it settle , then use aquarium pH test kit ( methyl blue or bromthymol blue , I forget). Or ...


1

Carpobrotus rossii. Edible fruit, can become a weed. Not likely to survive winter and become a weed in Germany.


1

You can try misting the unopened flowers with water,but essentially, when the blooms open on a plant is variable and exact accuracy about when they will open is not possible. All your Kalanchoe plants are at the blooming stage, and all will open up probably within the next few days.


1

This is Iris japonica , details here https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/9281/Iris-japonica/Details. Although not considered particularly invasive, it does spread by means of long, slender, creeping rhizomes, and yours has spread quite a bit. If you can find another spot for it in the garden, move it there, preferably a place without paving nearby because it ...


1

Unlike Agaves, Haworthias may flower many times, so if you want to keep them alive, just take care of your plant, and no need to remove the flowers. Haworthias are normally pollinated by some proboscis flies and bees. I don't know if bee species outside South-Africa recognize the flower as a pollen source, so you may need hand-pollination. If you grow some ...


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