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5

This is Kenilworth Ivy, or, scientifically, Cymbalaria muralis. It loves to climb on walls and brickwork ("muralis" signifying "wall" in Latin). I did not know until now that it is considered (by some) to be medicinal.


5

Yes, it works. Use any type of soil that has a loose touch because the plants need some oxygen in it and if it's too compact it will keep only water without air. Water only when the soil is completely dry, not dry only at the surface. As a personal note, I wouldn't burry all the leaf stem because they are sensitive to overwatering and rot easily. I burry ...


5

It looks like some type of Osmanthus to me. There are quite a few different species: O. heterophyllus, O. yunnanensis, O. fragrans (sweet olive), and many, many more! I think Home Depot's picture of their plant has the most resemblance to your photos: Osmanthus can be gigantic trees or small shrubs, or can be trimmed to become hedges. Some bloom in the ...


4

These are not cuttings, they are simply new growth coming off the roots of the plant, and as such, are not suitable for propagation purposes. You can propagate hydrangeas though, and there are three ways to do it; soft, semi ripe or hard wood cuttings, and all need to be of some length, not just little buds. Each type of cutting is taken at a different ...


4

It looks like lychnis coronaria, or the rose campion. There are other English names such as "dusty miller" from the grey leaves. In the UK, if you grow it as a garden flower it will self-seed and spread everywhere. The only "cultivation" required is getting rid of it where you don't want it growing!


4

Have patience, at least two weeks. In my collection there is a definite order of appearance from corms planted all at the same time, and my 5 colours go: orange, lavender, crimson, white, scarlet with about 10 days or so between first appearances of orange and scarlet. Under free self propagation in my soil orange tends to reproduce itself most freely ...


4

There are one or two misconceptions about plants generally in your question. Some plants do flower in mid winter or very early spring, when it is still cold - snowdrops and aconites are good examples. Generally, the bloom time for permanent plants is for a period of between 2-6 or maybe 8 weeks, with the exception of summer bedding or tropical/sub tropical ...


3

It is Dracunculus vulgaris, commonly known as Voodoo lily, snake lily, stink lily and other names. It's a deciduous, tuberous plant, which, despite its exotic appearance, grows well in temperate climes. Further information here https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/dragon-arum-lily/growing-dragon-arums.htm


3

Is the soil really wet? Sometimes they will rot in wet soil. Did they get planted in the same soil you used last year? Pull out a few of the dead/dying plants and look at the stems at soil level. I've found that the plants will have rotted at the soil line and no roots will come up with the plant.


3

You have basically answered your question: I haven't watered [...] them yet. They aren’t dead, they are thirsty! The soil is a bit out of focus in your photos, but it seems very dry. Not all plant sellers will take good care of their stock, especially if you bought them in a grocery store instead of at a florists’. So I recommend you give the pots a ...


3

This is a Fragrant Tea Olive. I got one from amazon couple months ago and it has bloomed couple times already in my house. The Fragrant is exactly how you described it Here is the link...Good Luck! Fragrant Tea Olive on Amazon


3

As you probably realise, millions of these plants (Poinsettia) are grown specially for the Christmas market, usually sold relatively cheaply at many outlets such as supermarkets and also garden centres (where they'll be more expensive!). They will have been 'hot housed' to get them ready for sale, and by that I mean grown in massive greenhouses with perfect ...


3

This looks like a Purple Heart Tradescantia that has fallen on hard times. In your image we can see some old leaves that are clasping the stem, a feature of the trandescantia, plus note the way that the plant compartmentalizes its water resources by shutting off damage at particular nodes. Here is an image from another site that shows the same ...


3

Judging from the flowers I would say it is from the genus Abutilon, a member of the "mallow" (Malvaceae) family, but I am not sure which species this is. There are over 200 species of this genus... See here if you want to read more about the Abutilon genus.


3

Looks like blue spruce, Picea pungens 'Koster', also known as Colorado spruce. These are fairly tolerant of various conditions, including some drought, once they are mature, but yours may have suffered some drought when they were smaller, which would explain the loss of some of the lower branches/foliage. The growth higher up looks healthy, although ...


3

It appears to be a Lace Lavender (Lavandula pinnata - see a photo here) from the Canary Islands. Seems like a mature plant for the size of pot it is in and has probably exhausted resources. Looks like there are some prime shoots at the top available for cuttings to make new plants and give it a reboot.


3

You seem to have an Azalea, it is related to Rhododendron. Azalea can be kept indoors, but only under proper conditions. It likes a lot of indirect sun light, so try not to keep it in full sun light. Also put the plant in a pot with proper drainage, too wet or too dry soil can kill the plant. Be careful with fertilizer, too much can also be harmful. Here is ...


2

It appears to be Adenium obesum,common name desert rose - the bulbous shape of the base gives it away. It comes in a range of flower colours, and the shoots you can see near the base are just that, new shoots. Their presence might indicate less than perfect growing conditions - you don't say where you are or whether this plant is in a pot or in the ground, ...


2

It's Osmanthus as already said in one of the other answers, specifically, Osmanthus fragrans, maybe the variety 'Conger' - there's a clear image of the flowers here https://m.dhgate.com/product/wholesale-tea-sweet-olive-osmanthus-fragrans/390370702.html#pd-019 Propagation can be done by collecting ripe seed, but they can take 6-18 months to germinate, so ...


2

They are roots. The plant is perfectly OK. In the wild they propagate by bits breaking off, growing roots, and starting a new plant. From the picture it looks like you have pruned some stems off, so the plant probably thinks more stems are going to get broken off soon and has started growing some roots in anticipation of that. Many succulents are ...


2

It's a Rhododendron - this particular kind was previously classified as Azalea. As for precisely which, I can't be sure - the leaves are wet, so I can't tell whether they're naturally glossy or leathery, and the flowers are not yet open, so I can't tell from the size of those either. There are two types of this plant which look quite similar, and sold at ...


2

Well it can and does flower under certain conditions; first, some varieties are more prone to bolting or flowering, but otherwise, the factors are usually maturity, or conditions such as a very warm spring might trigger flowering, or stress such as suffering drought. Rhubarb crowns which are lifted and split when they get large enough are less likely to ...


2

I think this is Neomarica gracilis, see here for example on wikipedia.


2

I'm pretty sure its a Campanula, probably Campanula Wonder White (also called White Wonder); as such, there's a paucity of information available with regard to hardiness. Usually, potted Campanulas sold in the houseplant section are not hardy outdoors unless you live somewhere with warm winters, and are sold as temporary visitors to display indoors. If you ...


2

Your violas/pansies are nearing the end of their natural life cycle - the “balls” are the seed pods. You can harvest them as soon as they start to open or wait and see whether they seed themselves. Some seed pods have already dispersed their seeds, so don’t be surprised if little seedlings appear at some point. The plants have kept growing new stems and ...


2

Just store them in a cool dry place until the normal planting time. You could plant them now. They won't start growing at the wrong time of year (the bulbs can be left in the ground all the year round which is how they grow in the wild of course), but you have a slightly increased risk of disease or of something eating them before next year - or simply ...


2

The leaves are also a little deformed, with puckering; I can't see any yellow mosaic, streaking or barring, so hopefully its not a virus. Otherwise, the most likely explanation is an insect infestation of some sort - I can see what looks like a whitefly on the one of the leaves, but check the underside of the leaves carefully, with a magnifying glass if ...


2

Number 1 is Impatiens, most likely Impatiens walleriana, common name Busy LIzzie; No.2 is a Begonia, but I'm not sure which - the usual one for summer bedding is Begonia sempervirens, but it doesn't look exactly like that variety, though it may be. No. 3 is Solenostemon (previously called Coleus); these come in a range of variegated colours, and are grown ...


2

The soil in the container looks quite dry, but it's not an appropriate container for a Canna, and there's not enough soil in it anyway. Canna get quite big, and need to be potted into a proper pot, preferably a minimum of around 6-7 inches deep, with drainage holes, that's a size or two bigger than the bulb (which will increase in size during the growing ...


2

I'm not sure what that plant is (though it is vaguely familiar) except to say it's not Lavender; whatever, the main problem is the too small pot it's in. Find a larger pot with drainage holes and put it in that, using new potting soil. Don't stand it inside that black outer pot you're currently using, because when you water, it likely runs straight through ...


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