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5

This is Kenilworth Ivy, or, scientifically, Cymbalaria muralis. It loves to climb on walls and brickwork ("muralis" signifying "wall" in Latin). I did not know until now that it is considered (by some) to be medicinal.


4

It looks like lychnis coronaria, or the rose campion. There are other English names such as "dusty miller" from the grey leaves. In the UK, if you grow it as a garden flower it will self-seed and spread everywhere. The only "cultivation" required is getting rid of it where you don't want it growing!


4

Have patience, at least two weeks. In my collection there is a definite order of appearance from corms planted all at the same time, and my 5 colours go: orange, lavender, crimson, white, scarlet with about 10 days or so between first appearances of orange and scarlet. Under free self propagation in my soil orange tends to reproduce itself most freely ...


4

There are one or two misconceptions about plants generally in your question. Some plants do flower in mid winter or very early spring, when it is still cold - snowdrops and aconites are good examples. Generally, the bloom time for permanent plants is for a period of between 2-6 or maybe 8 weeks, with the exception of summer bedding or tropical/sub tropical ...


3

Looks like blue spruce, Picea pungens 'Koster', also known as Colorado spruce. These are fairly tolerant of various conditions, including some drought, once they are mature, but yours may have suffered some drought when they were smaller, which would explain the loss of some of the lower branches/foliage. The growth higher up looks healthy, although ...


3

You have basically answered your question: I haven't watered [...] them yet. They aren’t dead, they are thirsty! The soil is a bit out of focus in your photos, but it seems very dry. Not all plant sellers will take good care of their stock, especially if you bought them in a grocery store instead of at a florists’. So I recommend you give the pots a ...


3

It is Dracunculus vulgaris, commonly known as Voodoo lily, snake lily, stink lily and other names. It's a deciduous, tuberous plant, which, despite its exotic appearance, grows well in temperate climes. Further information here https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/dragon-arum-lily/growing-dragon-arums.htm


3

Is the soil really wet? Sometimes they will rot in wet soil. Did they get planted in the same soil you used last year? Pull out a few of the dead/dying plants and look at the stems at soil level. I've found that the plants will have rotted at the soil line and no roots will come up with the plant.


3

It appears to be a Lace Lavender (Lavandula pinnata - see a photo here) from the Canary Islands. Seems like a mature plant for the size of pot it is in and has probably exhausted resources. Looks like there are some prime shoots at the top available for cuttings to make new plants and give it a reboot.


3

You seem to have an Azalea, it is related to Rhododendron. Azalea can be kept indoors, but only under proper conditions. It likes a lot of indirect sun light, so try not to keep it in full sun light. Also put the plant in a pot with proper drainage, too wet or too dry soil can kill the plant. Be careful with fertilizer, too much can also be harmful. Here is ...


3

As Kid mentioned plants grow towards the light. For this reason, make sure you turn your pot weekly a 1/4 or 1/2 turn. This will provide you plant equal light on all sides. I would suggest starting with a taller stake, rather than putting more soil in the pot. More soil means more moisture. Longer it takes for your plant to dry out. But, yes you ...


2

It's a Rhododendron - this particular kind was previously classified as Azalea. As for precisely which, I can't be sure - the leaves are wet, so I can't tell whether they're naturally glossy or leathery, and the flowers are not yet open, so I can't tell from the size of those either. There are two types of this plant which look quite similar, and sold at ...


2

Well it can and does flower under certain conditions; first, some varieties are more prone to bolting or flowering, but otherwise, the factors are usually maturity, or conditions such as a very warm spring might trigger flowering, or stress such as suffering drought. Rhubarb crowns which are lifted and split when they get large enough are less likely to ...


2

I think this is Neomarica gracilis, see here for example on wikipedia.


2

Number 1 is Impatiens, most likely Impatiens walleriana, common name Busy LIzzie; No.2 is a Begonia, but I'm not sure which - the usual one for summer bedding is Begonia sempervirens, but it doesn't look exactly like that variety, though it may be. No. 3 is Solenostemon (previously called Coleus); these come in a range of variegated colours, and are grown ...


2

The leaves are also a little deformed, with puckering; I can't see any yellow mosaic, streaking or barring, so hopefully its not a virus. Otherwise, the most likely explanation is an insect infestation of some sort - I can see what looks like a whitefly on the one of the leaves, but check the underside of the leaves carefully, with a magnifying glass if ...


2

Just store them in a cool dry place until the normal planting time. You could plant them now. They won't start growing at the wrong time of year (the bulbs can be left in the ground all the year round which is how they grow in the wild of course), but you have a slightly increased risk of disease or of something eating them before next year - or simply ...


2

I'm pretty sure its a Campanula, probably Campanula Wonder White (also called White Wonder); as such, there's a paucity of information available with regard to hardiness. Usually, potted Campanulas sold in the houseplant section are not hardy outdoors unless you live somewhere with warm winters, and are sold as temporary visitors to display indoors. If you ...


2

Your violas/pansies are nearing the end of their natural life cycle - the “balls” are the seed pods. You can harvest them as soon as they start to open or wait and see whether they seed themselves. Some seed pods have already dispersed their seeds, so don’t be surprised if little seedlings appear at some point. The plants have kept growing new stems and ...


2

The soil in the container looks quite dry, but it's not an appropriate container for a Canna, and there's not enough soil in it anyway. Canna get quite big, and need to be potted into a proper pot, preferably a minimum of around 6-7 inches deep, with drainage holes, that's a size or two bigger than the bulb (which will increase in size during the growing ...


2

I'm not sure what that plant is (though it is vaguely familiar) except to say it's not Lavender; whatever, the main problem is the too small pot it's in. Find a larger pot with drainage holes and put it in that, using new potting soil. Don't stand it inside that black outer pot you're currently using, because when you water, it likely runs straight through ...


2

Quite a few, but some may not like the damper, cooler weather during January/February and may stop flowering at that time. Look for Oleander, Pelargoniums, Bougainvillaea, Russelia equisetiformis, Hibiscus, Lonicera, and roses, though these last will do better if you can find somewhere to plant them that doesn't get full sun during high summer when it's ...


2

Horticulture is a very big subject - you'd need to refine your research to locate anything helpful, there is no 'catch all' website, all will require some degree of knowledge if you're completely new to gardening. Information on this subject for schoolchildren can be very helpful if you really know nothing much, it generally covers the basics of ...


2

The side flowers appear to be Galanthus Nivalis, but the flowers on top seem to be different. I'll see if I can find anything on them but with only the flower head it will always be a guess. The Galanthus around the cake have quite a few distinguishing features though. EDIT: The white flowers on top appear to be Hyacinth flowers. Both bloom in early spring ...


2

I can't see any reason why it would with an amaryllis or any other flower. Lilies, though, will last slightly longer if the pollen is carefully removed because the pollen falls easily and can cause damage to the flower and therefore shorten the bloom's life, but it's not necessary to remove the stamens or pistil. Lilies and Amaryllis do not belong to the ...


2

-->Usually plants propagates in the direction of sunlight. if there is no equal distribution of light on the plant this might be one of the reason. --> you might be watering plant from one side of the plant so plants leans towards wet side.


1

Those are seeds, you can harvest them if you want to sow them next year.


1

Every time I plant petunias I prepare for my battle against the budworms (they are actually caterpillars). These caterpillars are voracious and will cause extensive damage quickly. I have tried a few homemade "safer/greener" concoctions, none of which worked. Pesticide spray listed for budworms works the best for me.


1

Aloe vera is monoecious, meaning male and female parts of the flowers are present in each plant. However, there is another problem if you only have one plant; the flowers are what's known as protandrous, which means the stamen releases pollen before the stigma is ready to receive it. You might be able to do it if you have more than one flower, by attempting ...


1

In Java, Indonesia, as far as I know all four-o'clock plants all have single-colored flowers. So, here a four-o'clock plant with red flowers will always produce red colors and only red colors, same for white, yellow, and orange colors. Here, four-o'clock plants with orange flowers are very very rarely seen(!). The only multi-color flowers I found here are ...


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