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Your bright flower is a variety of Sulfur Cosmos, Cosmos sulphureus! They range originally from Southern North America through Northern South America, and have spread to regions all over the world! They are known for attracting butterflies, and have been extensively planted in some regions. There are also different varieties, including some with orange or ...


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I thnk the basic problem is that they are much too crowded together, so they are growing to try to get more light. Even small flowering plants need to be 8 or 12 inches apart to develop normally to their full size. If you sowed the seeds straight into the container, you need to sow more seeds than that since they won't all germinate, and then thin out the ...


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Drought - 3-5dl of water with high temperatures, even twice a day, is not sufficient, especially as the plant has got bigger with a bigger root system since you first potted it up. Give it a litre or two now, then another litre in an hour or so, so it has a chance to get soaked right through all the soil. Then you'll need to cut out dead areas, but first ...


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Definitely holly hocks they look like my seed they sre the mallow family, some people like using them for a medicinal plant and for making teas


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Black beauty zucchini definitely does this, churning out all these male flowers at first (beautiful!) until it has enough big leaves (stalks seem to grow taller and wider later than their first appearance and bloom).


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That's not a marigold, its either a Sulphur Cosmos (Cosmos Sulphureus) or Tickseed (Coreopsis Grandiflora/Lanceolata)


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That's an annual sunflower known as either Mexican Sunflower or by it's botanical name, Tithonia. They're large plants and tend to have a lot of flowers over the summer. It's a good pollinator plant as well. As for caring for your plant, there's not a whole lot you have to do other than keep it watered. Wikipedia has a good article on the genus.


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Pelargoniums (which is what "annual" geraniums actually are) take more than eight weeks to flower from seed, which is why many gardeners either root cuttings from the previous year or start seeds indoors, in mid-late winter. In fact, this site and this site both give a range of 12 to 16 weeks. Your plants will eventually bloom, but maybe not until ...


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Lavender is an aromatic plant and the flowers are scented; but they do not scent the air, both the flowers and the leaves have to be bruised or rubbed to release the scent, so if you were expecting to stand nearby and smell the lavender once in flower, you won't. Lavandula augustifolia is the main variety used to produce lavender oil, when both the flowers ...


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