Hot answers tagged

37

With plants, you would be doing yourself a disservice. The average potted plant takes up moisture (water, salts and other substances from the soil) from the soil with their roots and a significant part of this water is expelled by the leaves and evaporates. In short, the plant acts like a humidifier. This is why we water our plants. How much water a plant ...


20

Those are male flowers, so what you're experiencing (no fruit) is absolutely normal. Female flowers have a mini fruit underneath, and usually appear when the plant is a little older. Look for a miniature fruit under the flower. The shape will depend on your variety. It looks like you may already have 1 or 2. It is normal for a young squash plant of any kind (...


13

Leaves are good compost if they are shredded. If left as is on garden beds or lawns they tend to clump and can smother the smaller perennials. To do my fall clean up I put a bagger on the mower and go at it. I can put up to six inches (12 cm) of fluffy shredded leaves on top of rhubarb and by next June or July the worms have eaten it up. They will do the ...


12

I think that's an osteospermum whirligig, also commonly known as African Daisy or African Cape Daisy. It's a perennial in USDA Zones 10 or 11, and sub-tropical regions, and is a long-blooming annual in cooler climates. It's shrub-like in shape, low-growing, and measures 8" to 12" high and 12" wide at maturity. Very versatile, it's a great garden bed or ...


12

Many people plant marigolds (Calendula officinalis, not the French marigold, Tagetes) as a 'trap' crop, but the 'trap' attracts aphids, particularly blackfly. The theory is, if the blackfly inhabit the marigolds, they won't inhabit your roses or whatever it is you're trying to protect. In my experience, blackfly do love marigolds - not quite as much as they ...


12

It's a Celosia plant. It's also known as a "fire" flower because of its yellow, orange, and red colors. It can come in a couple of other colors. It's a full sun flower that drops its seeds so it can overtake a garden if you don't collect the seeds (or just plant it separately) "so they say". I have planted them successfully with impatiens and they did great.....


12

That is lantana. ASPCA Website says: "Lantana Additional Common Names: Shrub Verbena, Yellow Sage, Red Sage Scientific Name: Lantana camara Family: Verbenaceae Toxicity: Toxic to Dogs, Toxic to Cats, Toxic to Horses Toxic Principles: Pentacyclic triterpenoids Clinical Signs: Vomiting, diarrhea, labored breathing, weakness. Liver failure - more common ...


11

That is Claytonia perfoliata, known as Miner's Lettuce in the US. It's often used as a salad green in winter lettuce mixes. It's extraordinarily cold hardy. Not much flavor though (at least in my opinion).


11

That is a partially opened Lantana flower. See comparison pics: I think it is Lantana camara. See picture of L camara below:


11

You may actually have purchased a "dyed" orchid. While a very few varieties of phaleonopsis in the blue/purple family exist, they are rare, and will produce the same colored flowers each blooming season. They're also a lighter, less vibrant color than the one you're describing. Most orchids in that color spectrum are actually white orchids which have gone ...


11

The black bugs are the larvae of ladybugs. They are there to eat the aphids. As larvae or adults ladybugs are efficient beneficial predators. There is no need to wash them away they are working for you! I wonder if you have other plants that have aphids. Some adults have wings and fly to new hosts. Check your other plants for aphids. As they are soft ...


11

This is Lunaria annua. Some call it the money or silver dollar plant. Lunaria annua You are looking at the seed of this plant.


10

Edited to add: Ahhh! The pictures you added tell a lot. Your plants are further along than I assumed based on your original post. When the plants are as far along as yours are, flowers not opening can be a sign of stress. Sometimes it happens when you have a squash vine borer, but in your case, I think it is because the plants are much too close together. I ...


10

Pacific Northwest, it's either Mayweed Chamomile, or Pineapple Chamomile, both members of the fennel family. As kids, we'd pull the flower heads off and chew on them for the flavor. We grew up with the Mayweed variety. OSU Identification - Mayweed & Mountain Pineapple


10

It looks like Cleome hassleriana, commonly known as spider flower. Identifying characteristics are the compound leaves with seven leaflets, the long petioles (leaf stalks), the way that the individual flowers are held tightly furled around the flower head, and the long stamens visible on the older flowers lower down on the head. It's an annual, and spreads ...


10

That's a freesia, a group of iris-relatives. Due to their interesting flower shape, strong scent and comparatively low "fussyness" they have been cultivated and hybridized a lot over time. They come in a wide range of colours and sizes. Many of us will know them as cut flower where they contribute scent and visual interest to bouquets; because the ...


10

I believe I've found it: Pycnostachys urticifolia, more commonly called Blue Witches Hat. From Annie's Annuals: Stunning, bright cobalt blue, “Witch’s Hat” blooms delight us Fall through early Spring on this easy-to-grow, evergreen perennial/shrub from South Africa. Fast growing to 4’ or 5’ tall & almost as wide, it creates a multi-branching shrub, ...


10

This is definitely (I should never say definitely) but when I first saw your pictures I thought squash. This looks like WATERMELON! How long ago did you take these pictures? Any signs of little gourds? A member of the Cucurbitaceae family. watermelon plants


9

I've used sudsy dish soap such as Dawn before to combat insects such as aphids and it is quite effective and the one I used (it wasn't Dawn specifically) was biodegradable and that's important to me. The key to using Dawn or anything (siding cleaner, bleach, etc.) around plants is that you need to lower the concentration of the chemical low enough that it ...


9

You can try rooting it if you want by snipping the stem just below a bud at the base, stripping off the thorns and leaves, leaving one leaf at the top if you like, but you can take them all off, and inserting it into a sharp sand or sand/compost mix in a deep pot. The stem should be around 9 inches long, and you need to bury it so that only a quarter of the ...


9

I haven't done specific research, but am happy to provide you with my personal experience. Every year I grow many varieties of marigolds and they're always among the least bothered in my garden. Animals who eat annuals and perennials planted alongside my marigolds almost always completely ignore them. Those include chipmunks, rabbits, squirrels, and larger ...


9

It's next to impossible to give a 100% definite ID I'm afraid - it might help if you could provide a close up of a fully open flower and a bud that's showing colour but nowhere near open to decide whether its an HT or floribunda rose, but on current showing, it would appear to be a floribunda, possibly something like 'Mardi Gras' but there are literally ...


9

Let me preface this answer with: Thank you. Now I have another plant on my garden wish list. This beauty is a comparatively new cultivar of Hydrangea macrophylla with filled blooms. It is based on Japanese breeder Irie Ryoji's H19-17 or H. macrophylla "Love". Dutch breeders Van Klaveren developed the "You & Me" series, the blue version is You & ...


8

Chicken manure has a high level of nitrogen, Which encourages stem and leaf formation. If you are more interested in the flowers, add more potassium and less nitrogen. Wait until the temperature stays mostly below 45°F (7°C) and then prune it back, and thin the bush. It will naturally grow some long canes and that is fine, as long as it is properly pruned ...


8

Asarum canadense,canada wild ginger. Positive Id can be confirmed on the flowers of which two are just visible at the base of the stem. Relatively common to most of eastern North America. In my garden not a delicate wildflower but a slowly spreading groundcover that is fairly tough in hot and dry conditions as long as the soil is fairly rich pollinated by ...


8

Composting Pros: germicide. Cons: it take times, some clover seeds can germinate after composting and it is not suitable for large gardens. Herbicides (Postemergent) Pros: As per @J. Musser 's suggestion > quick; especially on rocky and hard soil. Cons: all derivated from herbicide use and clovers may regrow. Herbicides (Preemergent ) Pros: quick method ...


8

Goji berry vines are highly susceptible to Powdery Mildew. In fact, I wouldn't recommend trying to grow them in the Pacific Northwest as it's too damp here. In 10 years of trying, they leaf out lushly, and about a month later start mildewing. Nothing you do will get rid of the mildew as it's a systemic problem with the plant. I've only ever gotten about ...


8

I have done this successfully several times, but in a warmer zone (Lancaster, PA, zone 6b). I put the bulbs in a 33 degree F. refrigerator for about 2 weeks first, reasoning that it would prepare them for the cold (~15-20 deg. F. at the time). They all survived, each time. Things to note: If you use the fridge, make sure there is no fruit in it, or the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible