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The expert answer by @benn is interesting and authoritative. When combining garden plants with ingestion and animal health clearly there is a problem for the gardener in the presence of cadmium. However not all plants in a garden are destined to be eaten; some are destined for other uses not involving deliberately putting cadmium-rich plants in contact with ...


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Please take caution, cadmium is a very toxic pollutant both for the environment and human health. I have done (PhD) research on soil toxicity, and cadmium was one of the most toxic compound I analyzed. I would suggest not to consume any of the vegetables grown in this ground. Your zinc treatment sounds like a bad plan, I would advice not to take the risk of ...


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Most of this is rubbish, you know how they grow those massive pumpkins? They.make sure it's the only one then inject glucose directly into the stem. Plants can metabolism sucrose and fro rose and glucose. Use something natural like honey which is easier for them to absorb but it's mostly done to increase microbial activity to release more nutrients in ...


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The Soil Science Society of America has a nice reference page that you might find helpful. Somewhat surprising to me was that their advice for small-scale contaminated sites was, essentially, to do nothing. Here's a quote: Many petroleum hydrocarbons are naturally-occurring compounds, as they are harvested from the earth. Of course, many are also further ...


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The AgroThrive website doesn't list a 3-3-5 product called "AgroThrive All Purpose Organic Liquid Fertilizer." They have a 3-3-2 product called "AgroThrive Organic Fertilizer - General Purpose" and a 3-3-5 product called "AgroThrive Organic Fertilizer - Fruit & Flower." Both products have the same instructions for use in ...


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