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Growmore has no odour at all and is not attractive to rodents, so fine to use in pots; it is not an 'organic' fertiliser in that it contains no animal products. It's also useful as a general fertiliser lightly turned into the soil in spring around planting in the garden; because of its granular formulation, it slowly releases nutrients over a period of six ...


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Your tomato plants may not need to have calcium applied to the soil they're growing in; an erratic or inadequate watering regime is most often the cause of blossom end rot, as well as some varieties of tomatoes being more susceptible to this problem. Without regular and sufficient supplies of water, the plant is unable to take up calcium from the soil and ...


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Assuming you are talking about seaweed, it's not exactly a fertilizer as such in that it does not feed plants directly, rather it improves the soil the plants are growing in and is a very good addition to garden soil. Mineral content does vary slightly depending on the particular variety of seaweed, but all varieties generally contain high levels of ...


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There is evidence of seaweed being used as fertilizer for at least 600 years, and probably much earlier than that. In the UK alone, you should be able to find information on the traditional methods used for in the Channel Islands, the west coast of Ireland, and the Hebrides. One issue is the salt content. This is unlikely to be high enough to cause problems ...


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