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I live in a region where Norway spruce grows wild, and in my experience, the lower shaded branches shedding their needles and dying is perfectly normal for these trees. For the tree, there's no point in keeping these branches alive when the same energy and nutrients can instead be directed towards the upper branches that receive more sunlight. Here's a nice ...


4

Once the needles turn brown or fall off a branch, regeneration will not take place, though you may find growth at the tips of those branches. Probably the best thing to do is remove the affected branches at the base leaving a clean trunk - hopefully this won't notice because of the shrubs around it. Loss of the lower branches is not that unusual - we have a ...


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Nearly all conifers except yews do not replace dead foliage or small branches from the trunk or large branches. Arbs will occasionally resprout from the trunk, but this is never particularly good looking foliage and is always extremely slow. Leaf/branchlet loss on a young and small evergreen is not nearly as serious as it is on larger plants, however. This ...


4

Your Green Giant can attain a width of at least 12 feet, so you'll never notice the crooked base after a few years - assuming that the area at the base of the plant is relatively weed free so that the branches aren't shaded by competition. Even if you limb it up at some point, the crookedness will impart some architectural interest to the trunk. I would ...


3

I have Trachelospermum Jasminoides, Fake Jasmine, for this. It copes well with clay and wind. It fares less well in the shadier parts of the garden but does survive. You wil need a trellis or similar for it to climb up and it will not be as dense a growth as cotoneaster or berberis but it breaks up the wind effectively and is covered in fragrant flowers all ...


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Probably the toughest one that will tolerate the conditions you mention is Prunus laurocerasus, commonly known as cherry laurel. There are a few varieties of this plant now,some with narrower, neater leaves. It does get quite large though at up to 25 feet with a spread of up to 10/12 feet over time. Cotoneaster cornubia is semi evergreen, has red berries in ...


3

That looks like a larch, Larix sp. (Obligatory Monty Python reference.) I'm IDing it based on the way the needles are clumped. Here's what larch needles look like up close: (image source) The larch is a deciduous conifer, so if your tree loses its needles every winter, that would support the larch hypothesis. The needles are also quite a bit softer than the ...


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They'll be fine after you plant them. I assume that you're in the north (US or Europe), so it's very important that you water the arbs very, very well this autumn - up until the ground freezes. This will help prevent them from experiencing any/much winter-kill. I would also water them well the next summer (at least one inch/2-3cm per week). After a season in ...


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Spider mites attack lower branches , starting near the trunk of spruce trees. Dormant oil should control them but it may require a few applications months apart, They are tiny and you have to look very closely and magnification helps. To get to the center of the tree I have taken the sprayer in to the trunk of the tree and sprayed rather than try to spray ...


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Yes, it shouldn't be a problem. This particular variety has a natural tendency to grow in a pyramid shape, and hollies generally exhibit strong apical domination, so the removal of the central leader just means another one or two will appear. This variety is said to get between 15 and 20 feet tall, with a spread of 8-15 feet.


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This appears to be Escallonia rubra.


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Elaeagnus x ebbingei and Elaeagnus × ebbingei 'Limelight' (a nicely variegated type) are both fast growing, tough evergreens. As ever, you'll get the best results if you plant and maintain the shrubs properly. Dig nice big planting holes. Water as necessary until they're established and keep the surrounding area (a one metre plus circle around each shrub) ...


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Another branch will become leader; For a tree that young it will look fine in a year, Bigger conifers will also develop a new leader but it will take a few years of growth to develop a regular appearance. Sometimes a mature tree will always have an oddly shaped top.


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Assuming you mean Prunus laurocerasus and not Prunus rotundifolia, height and spread will be 4-8 metres tall with a spread of 8 metres wide. That means, from the shapes you see in your diagram, it will look most like the 'spreading' one eventually. If you plant more than one, they will need to be a minimum of 8 metres apart so they look like individual large ...


1

Here are a few suggestions, all from this page. Banana Shrub, Michelia figo: fragrant, banana-scented flowers. Heaviest blooming in spring, but blooms all season. Night Blooming Jessamine, Cestrum nocturnum: small, not very showy, fragrant flowers at night during the summer Arabian Jasmine, Jasminum sambac: fragrant flowers from summer into fall, or year ...


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Looking into a zone 8 forest , I see yaupon, lots of yaupon , Ilex vomitorium. A holly but no thorns on the leaves . American holly grows well here but does not make a screen- barrier- wall like yaupon. I don't know if you can buy it in a garden shop but you can dig all you want in east TX ( with permission or no one looking). You would not need to baby any ...


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If you're in the US, you might want to consider American Holly (Ilex opaca) or some of its related cultivars. American Holly actually has its own web site, with more information and a small list of cultivars. The species itself is way too large for a screen (without pruning), but I'd bet you'll be able to find a cultivar that would fit within your space ...


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Assuming you want an evergreen screen, consider using Prunus varieties - Prunus lusitanica, the Portugal laurel, can be used for hedging or as a single shrub, needs cutting only once a year, usually in spring, to keep it in bounds or to shape, and is highly tolerant of shady conditions, see here https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/14003/Prunus-lusitanica/Details ...


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The Canadian Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) is a very shade-tolerant tree that can supposedly be pruned into a hedge. Below is info from https://chiefrivernursery.com/canadian-hemlock-tsuga-canadensis-seedlings-transplants.html Canadian Hemlocks are very versatile, long-lived conifers. They can live to be several hundred years old. The trees are fragrant and ...


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@Kevinsky provided a link in their answer to a similar question that you may find helpful - the specific link is from the Morton Arboretum and discusses seasonal needle drop. It also says that, in times of drought, evergreens will lose needles or, in the case or arbs, branchlets., which is what your arbs are doing. I think your issue may be with watering, ...


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