10

My summary of the various information sources would go something like: Light outside the range 400 to 700 nm is less useful. As all the light shown below is in the 400-700 range you are not spoilt for choice. . All light in the range is useful but that in the middle may be somewhat less so that at the right hand end may perhaps be slightly more so ...


7

There are many options for electric chainsaws. I have owned a handful over the years and all have underperformed, but that is to be expected with the exceedingly low prices on the units. Safety: Chain brake- Required in my mind. Kickback/pull-in teeth- These are the aggressive steal teeth below the bar that are more important than they seem, provide ...


5

Depending where you are, you often have a minimum burial depth, which in my area depends on how you protect the cable. Pouring concrete around/over it reduces the depth it needs to be buried to. As for the digging, it depends on the amount of trench and you. Step zero - contact the local "call before you dig", "dig-safe", "blue stake" or whatever the ...


4

You have to call the utility to get a locate on the lines. Every electrical utility can have different standards. Practically speaking, if you gently hand dig you should not have a problem. If you do so you take all the potential risk for accidents and mishaps so this is why I recommend using the free locate services that many utilities offer. Edit:...


3

I've planted right over the top of mine, and many people in my neighborhood do. For my plantings near the lovely green box, I hand dug down about a foot and never saw any sign of wires. For the foundation plantings I put in near my house, I accidentally unburied a pvc pipe with wires that was about 2 inches under the surface. Since I was digging with a hand ...


3

If you want more light from the same florescent fixture, you will need a new ballast (power supply from "wall power" to "bulb power") as well as a new bulb. At which point a whole new fixture might make more sense. Not having fiddled with 18" bulbs any time recently I'll leave the question of exactly what you might replace it with to others. These days ...


2

I have a little bit of experience with this now. So, I thought I'd post my results, so far. I haven't had much to work with besides Hulda Clark zappers, though (and they're not what other people have used; Hulda Clark zappers use specific frequencies with square waves and a positive offset; they usually are powered by 9v batteries; they're what I have; so, ...


2

Electroculture is the keyword you want. It was big in the 70's. As you already know, there were positive and negative results. Relevant searches: plant growth electroculture Google Scholar plant growth electroculture I've never tried it, so can't address the question of 'what really works, and for what plants?', but this should let you find the ...


1

You'd basically have to rebuild the tool from the ground up. It would be easier to stick a drill/spacer system on an already powered motorized machine. What I find is that if the soil is properly worked and smoothed, these manual seeders work quite well. I use one that is almost 40 years old. And if you're working an area too large for that to be practical,...


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