6

It looks a lot like an aphid cast/skin.


5

It is difficult to say. Humans feel temperatures differently than a thermometer, but also the plants do not feel temperatures like thermometers. If it is just a very short period, and then suddenly normal temperatures, they survive without problem (I have sometime hail, which is ice). Soil store heat (and release heat), so after a hot period, a short period ...


5

Support is good for eggplants as the fruit may become heavy and can even break the branches. I have used tomato cages successfully, making sure the fruit are not trapped "inside" the cage, and ensuring there is good airflow through the plant. This is for pest control access, and so the plant does not rot, especially in hot, humid and/or rainy weather. ...


5

It certainly does look like a springtail. Those are great pictures, not easy to get due to their size! The springtail is very common and has been found on every continent. They live in dark, moist places, and feed on microorganisms found at the base of plants, in mulch beds, and piles of wet leaves. If the weather gets hot and dry, they frequently find ...


5

Organic mulch should not result in plant loss for any reason, unless the mulch is applied too thickly up against the crown or stem of an herbaceous plant. My experience with cocoa bean hulls is that a very young/small annual can succumb to rot if that happens; I assume that the same issue would occur with rice hulls (cocoa bean hulls go through a period of ...


4

Well it might, actually - eggplants require rich, moist soil conditions so they can take up plenty of moisture and nutrients, and that may well have been difficult in crowded circumstances, especially if you didn't add plenty of humus rich materials to the soil beforehand. When the fruits go brown, it's usually because they're well past maturity, and as your ...


4

Looks like Epilachna varivestis Mulsant (Mexican bean beetle larva) from Coccinellidae family. Cultural Control: Cultural control efforts may include destruction of overwintering locations and late planting of the soybean crop. The destruction of overwintering locations increases exposure to inclement weather conditions and can greatly reduce adult numbers ...


4

Some support won't hurt, especially if it is a large fruited variety. Consider... even if the plant can support the fruit, can it support the fruit in the wind? Eggplants get fairly woody, but keeping the fruit off of the ground keeps them from going bad.


4

I've just asked my wife (who has a lot of knowledge specific to growing eggplants commercially). When she came across this problem she pruned back the yellow leaves, and the plant was fine - indeed I've seen plants a lot worse then that come back to life just fine. I very much doubt it will thrive indoors as they require a lot of heat (24-28 degrees ...


4

There isn't anything magical about being inside or outside, the main thing is getting enough light, and that looks like it already isn't getting enough light. if you need eggplant, and you want to grow it yourself, you could invest in some grow lights and make an indoor oasis for this eggplant... your eggplants will end up costing you US$45 each, but you ...


4

Its extremely difficult to tell much from your pictures - it would be good if they showed the height - but from what little I can see, there are way too many flowers on the tree (although it looks quite healthy). Commercially we would let to stems grow, with 2 fruit per stem at a time. I believe you will get a better yield if you greatly reduce the ...


4

There are a few conditions to consider with temperature and fruiting plants. Below a certain temperature, fruit will not set on a flower. For eggplants this threshold seems to be night temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. However, the plant can still live, new flowers will form, and those new flowers can produce fruit. Below a further temperature, the ...


3

It is not the same as "Rosa Bianca". In English, it is called "Listada De Gandia". Here is University of Florida's overview of common eggplant cultivars in Florida, and one can find "Listada De Gandia" among them (and also "Rosa Bianca" for that matter). A couple of excerpts: ... Listada De Gandia: Plants grow 24–30 inches tall and 12–18 inches in ...


3

Yes, if it's anything like the varieties we grew (commercially, in a hothouse), looking at the size of the plant it should have started bearing fruit. Do you know which variety you are growing? There are a few possibilities why it might not be getting fruit, potentially including lack of a pollinator, although many varieties are, I believe, self-pollinating;...


3

I found in my gardens in the past when I had done pretty much the same thing a friend told me to use a mixture of carbon (or wood ash) with coffee grounds that it would help detoxify the soil and it worked for me I just worked in the mixture with a fork about 2 inches of the top soil and watered it as normal.


2

Eggplants can be sensitive to temperature. If it's too hot, they may not set fruit, probably because of sterile pollen (from the heat) as with tomatoes. My Diamond eggplants and another unknown variety wouldn't set in the heat (despite numerous flowers that were not in the habit of dropping particularly), but they would set fruit when it cooled down. However,...


2

Agree with BYJ's ID of the pest. Try neem oil concentrate, mixed appropriately, that should do the job - you'll probably need to spray every 14 days, otherwise, it's handpicking them all off, which whilst tedious, is certainly the most organic way to go.


2

If you can get one out of the soil and inspect it thoroughly, you should be able to decide exactly what type of grub it is. I don't know where you are in the world, so can't hazard a guess at whether its Japanese Beetle larvae or not - the link below has a picture of 3 different grubs which look remarkably similar, and also lists organic methods for ...


2

First, I just noticed that you have 7.4 pH and that is a big no no for solanaceae. Too high for MOST plants. You need to get that plant into fresh potting soil. Normally potting soil is lower in pH. Takes a bit of time and work to lower pH UNLESS you are using potting soil. When you get fresh potting soil, test the pH with whatever you use, I use 3 ...


2

Really they need a pot each - they require 12-14 inches of space or a five gallon pot each, so you'd get bigger plants and more fruits if they were in individual pots. According to this https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/eggplant/container-eggplant-plants.htm though, you can plant 2 or 3 plants in a 20 inch pot, but it doesn't make sense - 2 ...


2

Knowing when to pick them is a bit of an art - they should be harvested when the skin has turned dark purple, the fruit is glossy, but still firm. If you wait for them to soften, they may rot, which seems to be what happened to yours. More guidance on harvesting aubergine here https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/eggplant/how-to-harvest-...


2

It looks like it could be Alternaria, by the symptoms (especially the yellowing lower leaves). Alternaria is a genus of fungus that infects plants, and can even cause issues for humans. It's the closest thing in appearance I know about to what I'm seeing on your plants. Anthracnose is another possibility (it's a similar fungus). They're both common fruit rot ...


1

If you look at the underside of the leaves visible in your second picture and at the stem in the bottom right of the last picture, you have what looks to me like powdery mildew. All four of the plants you mention are susceptible to it, in my experience. Counterintuitively, hot dry conditions are perfect for it. My zucchini have it bad this year and I am ...


1

Highly unlikely the mulch caused the tomato plant to wilt. If there were toxins in the mulch it would have affected the eggplant as well. Most likely is there is a coincidental issue with the tomato plant. It's probably that you just happens to notice the wilting after the mulch was applied but it's likely just a coincident. Here are a couple of links ...


1

It looks like the neon eggplant or Solanum melongena: Description: Neon 60–65 days. Deep pink 3–4" fruits. Good flavor, and does well in cooler, short summer climates where most eggplant varieties don't grow. Meaty fruits to roast, fry, or bake in a range of cuisines.


1

This looks like a viral disease to me. The plant looks healthy in terms of color. Not a nutritional excess nor deficiency. I am almost sure this is a virus. Where did you get your soil? Do you compost? What did you use for soil? Did you use any compost? Are these really eggplants? They look like tomatoes but barely. I guess they could be eggplant ...


1

Well Yog, this should work just fine. I am worried that your plants aren't healthy-looking. What have you fertilized with? I am very glad you used potting soil! Did you put rock or gravel beneath the soil? Hope you didn't. I'd also raise the bottoms of those pots off your deck using pot feet or pieces of tile. Your tomato is greener but is also ...


1

I had the 'late blight tomato garden test strip' for Master Gardeners...a long time ago. You are correct in your thinking. I almost wish I'd tried that idea. But no matter weeds or clover, both will rob chemicals. It takes only ONE STUPID DROP WITH SOIL AND SPORE to infect and totally kill your tomato plant. I learned this the hard hard way! Couldn't ...


1

As I don't know better, and as Aphids were a common pest on my eggplants, I'd suggest this is an aphid. The picture looks quite similar to the one in Wikipedia for Aphis pomi. Speculating wildly, maybe the pyrethrum is not effective against this type of aphid, or maybe it has to do with where the pyrethrum was manufactured from. My wifes formula was ...


1

These little spots are a normal protective measure for lots of plants. It is fungus that the plant itself is getting rid of by allowing the part of the leaf that has been 'infected' by fungus spores to die and then the dead part drops out causing a black spot or hole. Very common this time of year for both your eggplant as well as tomatoes, squash......


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