13

Brew a pot (or several) of coffee (or have someone else do that if you don't drink coffee - or beg a bucket full of grounds from a diner/coffee-shop.) Take the grounds, dig a hole, insert grounds. Come back in two or three days, preferably at night, investigate coffee-grounds hole. Re-assess your need to buy worms depending on what you find. Your local ...


9

If you think you don't have any or enough earthworms in your garden, buying them in and adding them won't work. If they're not in your soil, it means the conditions are hostile, and those hostile conditions will mean any you add will disappear quite quickly. If you carry out the coffee grounds test suggested in another answer, and don't find many or any ...


6

Bait shops for fisherman or any store that stocks a complete range of "sporting supplies" should stock earthworms. I get mine from Canadian Tire where they are available on a seasonal basis.


5

Unfortunately diet isn’t a solution. Generically almost any critter can withstand a slightly more stressful environment if it is especially healthy. But good food won’t make it immune to an environment that’s a whole lot more stressful. Hot and dry, if sufficiently extreme, are so much stress that generic good health won’t help. Just the same, keep the ...


4

A few years ago I tried vermicomposting. It was a very interesting learning experience. I found that the worms can move about in the medium with great rapidity in response to changing conditions. I think a couple of rules of their behaviour are: to flee extremes of heat, cold, wet and dry, and they are very sensitive to the location of highly desirable ...


4

Worms will eat a LOT of stuff. They can eat any of your food scraps, cardboard, sawdust, leaves (any), fruit rinds, and almost anything else they will have access to in the wild. As long as the worms pretty much have these three ingredients they will eat it. The ingredients being bacteria, fungi, and algae. They will more then likely take a bite out of ...


4

It might be more to do with the fact you're not getting as much rain as usual - earthworms surface during wet weather, and many reasons for this have been proposed, but no one really knows why they do it. There are theories about oxygen shortage in waterlogged soil, or needing to come to the surface for breeding purposes, and these are all possibilities, but ...


3

Pity you didn't ask before all this work. To remove the top layer of soil beneath that concrete is just sad. But people commonly do this anyway. Purchasing topsoil the composition is never an exact product nor do they come with ingredient lists. I am curious as to what you are talking about with 'soil movement'...erosion? What kind of drainage, what % ...


3

I recall your question a few weeks back about changing levels in your garden - seems like you've gone ahead and had most of the work done professionally, as suggested. With regard to replacement soil, good, loamy topsoil in the UK should be fertile when its delivered, but it does depend to an extent which grade of topsoil you buy, and the supplier you ...


3

I would start off with the older leaves and either bag the newer leaves (shredded if you can) with a little bit of water and small bit of dirt or put them in a round wire cage as you accumulate. The wire cage method will over a longer term (1 year) provide leaf mold which the worms will eat and will of course attract worms. The bag method will break down ...


3

Both slugs and worms like well rotted composts, particularly if its damp - the only thing you can do is to reduce their activity so they can't so easily get inside your cabbages. You can try covering the compost with boards or even anchored down weed control fabric to keep the worms in the soil and off the cabbage. There are other methods described in the ...


2

Earthworms are sensitive to temperature and will flee soil that is up around 100 deg F. If you were to build up your compost into a loose pile, moistened to ensure free mobility of worms in the pile, make a flat top on the pile and cover it with black plastic on a sunny day this should encourage worms in the top layer to go deeper into the cooler soil. ...


2

In short, no. If there are no earthworms present, it's because the area is inhospitable to them, so any you try to add will just disappear. Usually, people don't want too much earthworm activity in a lawn because of the little piles they leave on the top of the lawn during damp periods in spring and autumn, but if you live somewhere hot and dry, you may ...


2

No, it's not worth buying worms in. If there's a problem with the soil that means they are not there, any you buy in will just disappear anyway. There probably are worms in your garden, but you just haven't seen them; you're in the UK, as am I, and here (in the south east) its been very dry for quite a long while until the last couple of days, on top of a ...


1

Your compost bin isnt breathing enough. Dirt will tend to pack more densely in the centre. Worms are avoiding that due to lack of air. Change your container to something with holes in the sides. In response to comment: Looking at the picture again, your material seems too wet. I made a worm system with holes in the very bottom too, using rubber made tubs. ...


1

Worms don't stay close to the well-lit surface. You could remove the thin surface (worm-free) layer of compost every five minutes until you end up with a pile of worms.


1

Earthworms are beneficial to soil . I have never deliberately added them to a pot , but I know some soil I have used contain them . If you know a gardener , they would likely love to have your "bad" soil.


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