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11

Cut off all dead wood at the base, leaving just the live stems - you don't need to do anything to the roots. You might, though, want to consider replacing the plant - it'll look pretty ugly once the dead stuff has been removed. This plant doesn't regenerate from old wood, so you won't get any new growth other than on the two existing live stems.


10

All of the currant family (red, black, gooseberry, lingonberry...) do reasonably well in shade. High and low bush cranberry do well in shade. If you have light shade, look at nut trees. It will be a good while before they produce, but it's worth a look. Hickory, hazelnut, walnut, beechnut are possibilities. I recall that one of persimmon and pawpaw do ...


9

You are going to have a very difficult time growing much in the forest portion of your land. Yes, currants and gooseberries, black raspberries, and possibly sour cherries will tolerate the shade and fruit, but most things will not. As far as vegetables go, you should be able to grow leafy greens - especially in the spring before the trees have leafed out, ...


6

Bananas like to grow in temperatures between 26-30 deg C, in high humidity, which means your 45 degrees is a bit much for it, particularly if it's in an unshaded position. They grow best in 'jungle' conditions, meaning with other plants giving some relief and shade from hot midday and afternoon sun. They also don't like being exposed to a lot of wind, so in ...


6

Definitely an Impatiens variety (busy lizzie) - can't tell how tall it is, but it looks remarkably like I. walleriana - if its taller than it seems, it'll be one of the New Guinea hybrids. I note the black specks on the plate its standing on - I'm assuming that's soil from the top of the pot from when you water. That indicates the soil is too high in the pot,...


5

Not only is it as good as an actual lawn aerating machine, its better - but it's time consuming and there's a knack to it. You need to insert the fork vertically and remove it in the same direction without tipping it either back or forward. Once you've inserted it, stand on it to make sure the tines go down to a good four inches, then pull it out. A little ...


5

You can: cut off the live branches and root them (put the base in water until roots come out) remove the rest of the plant plant the newly rooted branches where the old plant was.


5

My guess is something related to your soil. I'd get the soil tested and see what the results are. It's very possible that it is just over watering but that looks like a decent investment and a soil test is relatively cheap. If you have a university near by that does horticulture type work they probably provide cheap soil tests and advice.


5

It's a bit of a tall order, wanting plants that perform best in spring, summer and winter and not autumn, but I've had a go! Check out Ruscus aculeatus, the variety 'Sparkler' if you can get it, because that one's hermaphrodite and will produce red berries which last well into Winter. Otherwise, you'd need a mix of male and female to get berries. It's ...


5

No undergrowth forest plus creek makes me immediately think of allium ursinum (European variety) or allium tricoccum (US native). Both are happy to cover the forest floor in spring and disappear later in the year. If you are lucky, they take hold and propagate themselves. Not exactly a mass food source, but a spring kitchen staple for me. Used fresh in ...


5

It is likely that the roots of your plant have grown to occupy the entire volume of soil in the pot. There is no soil left to retain moisture. You can check this by popping the plant out of its pot. If all you see is root then it is time for a larger pot. Purchase a pot one size larger than the existing add fresh soil to the bottom of the new pot. ...


5

As I said in the comment, suggest you dig it into your allotment - the reason people are taking it is because they know it's valuable either as an addition to making potting compost, or simply using it to add to their own plots. Paradoxically, it wouldn't be great for growing lavender or rosemary - most herb type plants prefer poorer, less nutrient rich soil ...


5

From what I see here, your Aloe gets too much water for the sun it get. Aloe Vera leaves in very hot, sunny places (often sandy). e.g. already discussed here. It goes for the sun (phototropism) because it doesn't have enough. That explains the long thing leaves we see on your plant. Result of frequent watering, lots of water is pumped into the leaves, ...


4

Nuts of course, and some floor plants, will be naturals, but so as not to repeat others' answers, I thought I'd point out the issues/other things I noticed about your idea, rather than listing plants. No undergrowth means there isn't enough sun for the undergrowth. The lower tiers, and the floor, all depend on the amount of light let through the top canopy. ...


4

For once I have to disagree with Bamboo! Poking tines in the ground actually compresses soil further. Proper aeration is only done by REMOVING cores of soil and allowing these cores to disintegrate on top of the lawn. Very inexpensive to go rent one of these machines and usually works out well if you talk to your neighbors and share the machine. All ...


4

There are several possibilities. This might be cultural, that is, when you trimmed it, you cut that browned area too far back, into old wood, and these trees don't regenerate from old wood. If the weather was hot and dry for a couple of weeks after you trimmed it, then some patches may have had trouble regenerating, even if you didn't cut too far back. ...


4

It's odd that the fronds are all dying back at once in mature tree ferns, so unless you've had extremely windy conditions that are unusual, or something drastic has changed in the environment, I suspect there's a wider problem. Knowing where you are in the world would have been useful, but two things spring to mind. The first is root rot - tree ferns do ...


4

This is something I looked into a while ago and wrote about it on my site discussing if liquid aeration works. Based on my own use of surfactants and the research I came across I haven't found them to be effective for lawns contrary to what some people on forums indicate. They soil would have to be very dry and hydrophobic where it can't absorb any water ...


4

Your plant may have spider mites. Check on the underside of the leaves for what looks like small grains of salt. If you see them then apply soap and water at a ratio of 5ml to one litre three times at five to seven day intervals. The light and dark parts on the leaves indicate that this plant has a nutrient deficiency. As this site indicates: Guava ...


4

Why not do what people in similar climates used to do for centuries? Use large flat rocks to conserve soil moisture. You can amend their methods to work with drip irrigation too if you wish. Use of natural materials, especially stone, is a feature of permaculture in dry environs. This method is still practiced today. It's just not that common since most ...


3

Misting is not an effective way to raise the humidity around a plant unless you are in a greenhouse. The amount of time the humidity is raised is very small. Try checking the soil and watering when the top inch is dried out. Capillary matting or a wicking system is a great way to see that the plant gets the water it needs, but not too much. Palms are ...


3

Looks like an Impatiens, have the leaves been oiled? They are so shiny, that may not be the best thing for them if they have been oiled. I agree with getting the foil off and having a look at the roots, re-pot in fresh dirt.


3

I've had great luck in dry shade with a ground cover of Sweet Woodruff. It is attractive even when not in bloom, smells good, and in the spring and early summer is covered with tiny white flowers. It spreads quickly, likes shade and can tolerate drier conditions once you get it going.


3

This is the Brisbane Box (Lophostemon confertus). The flowers threw me off for a bit. The flowers on yours are about done blooming. It's native to Australia, but is cultivated elsewhere. I'm not sure if it's a bronze bug host.


3

I grew up in one of the hottest driest places in Australia. My mother still lives in this place... Adelaide, South Australia and she lives in a house on a quarter acre, surrounded by a large garden with no lawn. Most of her garden is watered by drip irrigation. Two elements are essential for success. Adequate water to sustain plants during periods of dry ...


3

This happens with many species when water is left 'standing' on the leaves, so "water the soil and not the leaves". If the brown bothers you, you can cut it off the leaves or entirely remove the affected ones. I am uncertain, but this may be associated with a fungus. If you want, you can spray with a peroxide solution, which is made by putting 2 tablespoons ...


3

Yeah, hate to give you bad news but this guy is toast. Why Bonsai does not come with instructions is irresponsible. Bonsai are just like a new pet. Constant attention. Because of the limited root mass Bonsai need watering pretty much every single day. Usually the entire pot gets immersed in water. When the roots are healthy they suck up all the water so ...


3

Your jade plant is dying because of lack of sunlight and too much watering. Jade plant in my area can survive hot summer days with minimum watering, its leaves will turn a slight red to indicate it is getting a lot of sun and will look wrinkly when needs water. So indoor jade plant will start shed leaves and yellowing if gets too much water and not enough ...


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