9

If you want to write software probably you are looking for customized solutions, you have imagination and you don't mind to do it yourself. I suggest you try search with google: Arduino + Watering ( for example look at this document: THE GARDUINO GARDEN CONTROLLER It is a simple open-source platform with which many hobbyists have already ventured and you ...


9

The rule of thumb I've often heard is 1" per week, but I know that some vegetables like more water (e.g. celery) than others. (And yields decline in tomatoes with less water, but the flavor is supposed to be incredible in "dry farmed" tomatoes. YMMV.) Figure out how long it takes to deliver 1" of water (do the math using your square footage and 1 gal/hour), ...


7

Generically, go with large diameter pipe. Specifically, you'd need to run calculations based on water flow rate, pipe size, and dynamic head (pressure loss due to flow rate) against the available input pressure at flow, and the acceptable minimum and maximum pressure for the drip emitters. So, you have 250 emitters - but at what flow rate per emitter? If, ...


7

This is not an uncommon problem that appears to be chalked up to a design flaw (check out the amazon reviews). Quite honestly, I can't say I'm surprised. The website says no tools are required. Few things involving residential water pressures are reliable with "hand tight" for very long, so I'm pretty skeptical. If it is leaking from somewhere other ...


6

First off, for cases where the fitting goes inside the hose, I often boil water in a kettle, and briefly dip the hose in the hot water before pushing it onto the fitting. This ensures it goes all the way. Second, when there is a chance that a fitting may pop off, for instance because the pressure might be too high or things don't fit quite right, I use ...


6

You can assemble a drip irrigation system on your own. If you’re the least bit handy, it’s not difficult at all. The system operates at low pressure, so the seals are as simple as punching a hole in a plastic tube and shoving in barbed fittings. For the larger fittings, a warm day and/or a rag with hot water to prewarm the inserted end do help. It’s ...


5

If you're techie enough to mess with code, feel free to use mine. I built an arduino-based solar powered one that cues off soil moisture levels instead of timing. https://github.com/kolosy/irrigation


5

A company called Irrigation Caddy makes a great product that runs on an internal network, and even has mods for remote offsite management depending on your router and web skills. http://www.irrigationcaddy.com/


4

Plants can be affected by so many different things from disease, over/under fertilization, weather, humidity, air flow, etc., and you haven't provided enough information for anyone to give any useful feedback. What part of the world were the tomatoes planted? Different areas have different problems. Country, region, city... What "chemicals" were used in ...


4

It is very unlikely you'll be able to adjust the faucet so that the drip system works well and doesn't over water your garden while leaving it on all the time. plants also don't want to be constantly wet. Reduces the amount of oxygen and nutrients they can take, increases chances of disease and weed seed germination. Just get the timer and remember you'll ...


4

Why not do what people in similar climates used to do for centuries? Use large flat rocks to conserve soil moisture. You can amend their methods to work with drip irrigation too if you wish. Use of natural materials, especially stone, is a feature of permaculture in dry environs. This method is still practiced today. It's just not that common since most ...


4

In general, I find ordering from Rainbird's website to be cheaper (and have more options) than ordering from Amazon for almost everything except tubing. Components (elbows, T-splits, emitters, etc...) are much cheaper. On the other hand, tubing (even Rainbird's tubing!) seems to be cheaper on Amazon. Also check Rainbird's clearance section, I found some ...


3

I have used two wi-fi controllers for our irrigation from http://www.hottimesoftware.com/wifi-time-control.htm and are happy with the results. Uses the Raspberry Pi to operate the solenoids and can be set to auto or manual functions. I can now control from anywhere in the world with my smart phone.


3

If your water is hard, you may find that calcium deposits have blocked the holes. Perhaps you can soak them into a vinegar solution of distilled/rain water over night to see if you can dissolve the concretions. Or, even try coca cola ... though I don't know what all those acids will do to your drippers. And you perhaps should put some kind of filter on ...


3

Most drip components I'm aware of, including this micro sprinkler you're using are very susceptible to clogging. It is not uncommon for there to be sediment in the water supply that will clog the filters which is why manufacturers of these systems also provide filter kits that will screen out sediment. What you have is a DIG micro sprinkler. If you want to ...


3

@SBB I'm probably too late to be helpful but thought I'd answer with some pointer. First, a small helpful hint for your drawing, which by the way is very good. Where pipe from one zone crosses pipe from another zone it's helpful to make a U on one zone, and erase the other zone's line in the center of the U. Another design hint I'd offer is that you might ...


3

I think you must have got a cheap hose. In my experience, you should be able to pull them apart without trouble. It sounds like you got a hose molded from shredded rubber or something, which explains wht they are ripping. That stuff isn't very strong. When looking for a drip hose, I tend to get the most expensive hose in the style I like. Quality does differ ...


3

Don't connect to your "hose adapter". Instead take the time to properly plumb your irrigation system into your "domestic" cold water system. My (very) limited in-ground sprinkler system knowledge is pretty much documented here on SE: How do I go about planning the layout of a sprinkler network for my lawn? No 8. Don't connect your irrigation system to ...


3

This is not a complete answer but may help with a few of your problems. Instead of replacing the whole hose, you can cut out the bad part(s), refit each end with threaded pieces, and get a small inline hose piece (of any size really) so long as the threading is the same. The drippers might have been jammed up with iron/calcium buildup.


3

I've established native grass meadows in full sun in hot dry New Mexico with drip micro sprayers. They're cheaper, easier to install, easier to maintenance and don't seem to require an astronomical flow rate. The only concern would be if you have a rogue yard maintenance man who mows over them, or kids playing soccer etc.


3

They make special sprinkler nozzles for dealing with narrow strips. They're called end strip and side strip. They have a more or less rectangular spray pattern. All major manufacturer's I've seen have them and they're designed to provide the same precipitation rate as other sprinkler nozzles in the same line so you can keep them on the same zone provided ...


3

I was concerned about the flow in this application, because for my set-up four spray heads would need at least 360 U.S. gallons per hour (1.5 gpm × 4 × 60 min, 1365 L/hr), and the 1/2" tubing allows for much lesser flow. For instance, Dig Corporation’s Drip Irrigation Installation Guide specifies that the maximum flow rate in their 1/2" (0.600" to be exact, ...


3

It looks like a head used to convert from irrigation spray nozzles or bubblers to drip irrigation so you waste less water. They come in several styles: You replace the spray or bubbler head on the 1/2 plastic stand pipe with it and push the drip tubing onto the connectors. The drip tubing terminates with drip emitters or bubblers tailored to the planting. ...


3

Without a photo, I'm only taking a stab at describing what I think you saw. There are many different names for this product, and it's made by at least Rainbird, Toro, and Netafim (probably others), but the larger tubing is probably call drip line (url was chosen for the photo rather than a recommendation of a specific product). It usually comes a bunch of ...


3

I grew up in one of the hottest driest places in Australia. My mother still lives in this place... Adelaide, South Australia and she lives in a house on a quarter acre, surrounded by a large garden with no lawn. Most of her garden is watered by drip irrigation. Two elements are essential for success. Adequate water to sustain plants during periods of dry ...


3

If I'm understanding what you're saying correctly, it sounds like you need to install what's called a spring check, a little device that only opens when there's a certain about of pressure applied to the upstream side. The ones I've shown can be adjusted. I would install it at one of two locations (the decision is up to you): after the top of the tank, ...


3

A typical solution is to put a "vacuum breaker" in line (say as the pipe goes out the top of the tank) - this permits flow under pressure, but when suction comes into to play it vents the pipe to air, breaking the siphon. It does not cause any restriction in the pumped flow.


2

It looks similar to what I have on my misting system, they connect to the main trunk line and allow smaller lines to be run off of it, similar to a splitter like you would put on an outdoor water faucet to attach two hoses. The knobs allow the ports to be opened and closed individually.


2

I'd suggest doing a little digging, and/or turning on the water. Something that looks a little bit like that is just a stake that holds emitters in place - but it certainly could be a distribution point that feeds several emitter lines. If you turn on the water and water comes out, then the latter, and it's attached to a pipe.


2

Following comments above - I'd use proper leaky pipe, not a soaker hose, that is, the greyish fibrous looking pipe that's meant to be buried 3 inches below the soil level. These don't get clogged because they don't have holes which drip as such, they seep into the soil along the entire length. The drawback is if you frequently want to dig the area or plant ...


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