3

I thought you were probably in the UK... First, let's just establish that we've had a fair bit of rain in the last few days with these storm conditions, so that might account for puddles for an hour or two, but no, it's not usual for puddling to remain for any longer than that because the soil 'hasn't settled', in fact, quite the opposite. You say the ...


2

There might be two or perhaps three different principles at work here. First and most important is that surface water needs a clear escape path away from the house otherwise it ends up in the basement. So principle one is to slope the land away from the foundation. Second principle is to have the soil at the correct level with respect to the foundation ...


2

It sounds like an earth dam. The most important part is the size and construction of the spillway ; where water runs out during wet weather. If water over-tops an earth dam .it is finished. Aside from that , we have 3 earth dams in the community : 2 have a body of water at the bottom of the dam so one can not see any seepage. The third ( about 500 ft long) ...


2

Might want to check with a friendly health inspection department. They have techniques for handling complaints about water possibly discharged from septic beds into neighbouring lands. Frequently this involves addition of a dye to water flushed through a toilet bowl and then watching to see if the dye appears at the discharge in question. One case I was ...


2

Just a small thought to add, most sands on tropical atolls are derived from coral, as such the last thing the sand needs for plant to grow in it is more alkaline material. I find a mix of sand with compost 50x50 and used in containers will grow tomatoes,eggplant, and peppers with the help of some magnesium sulphate and seaweed tea. .


1

Just add 1 part of Peat Moss or coco coir or compost , it will stop soil compaction , dont use perlite with regular soil it will simply crush the perlite


1

There are tons of things that can be added to potting mix to add drainage. Pumice, Granite, Gravel, Scoria, Caclined Clay, Calcined Diatomaceous Earth, Perlite, Bark, best to avoid Sedimentary rocks, but some types will work just fine. Anything that is slow to break down will work, even Styrofoam, not that I recommend using, especially not with food crops,...


1

You don't mention where you are, but peat and vermiculite are two of the least desirable water retention materials to use, in my opinion. Calcined clay, or oil absorbent, pumice, etc are much preferred. The oil absorbent is found in autoparts stores. Coconut coir is superior to peat in that it is much easier to rewet once it dries and it doesn't break down ...


1

You have clay soil thats also filled with rocks which sort of leaves you with 2 options. 1) dig down untill you find no more rocks/stones and then backfill with the same soil by first sifting it using a soil screen or replace it all together with new soil and then amend the soil using compost. I had worked on a similar project and the dept i had to go down ...


1

It would be good to know how long its been in that pot; hopefully not too long because the pot you've used is way too big for the plant, which is never a good idea. The pot should only be large enough to leave an inch (at most) of clear soil around and below the rootball. The reason for this is because, with a lot of empty soil around a rootball, over or ...


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