15

If it was me, I would most definitely drill some drainage holes in the bottom of that pot. Standing water will greatly increase the chance of disease developing within the soil... Standing water also greatly increases the possibility of plant root rot. I'm sure there is the odd occasion where one might not need drainage holes in a pot, but I have ...


12

You could try seaweed which has been used as a soil additive. Just chop it up and wash it with freshwater or compost it before using. Depending on where you are you should find varieties of palm trees. The fibre found between the hard outer shell and the inner nut is also used as a soil additive. Animal manure from goats, pigs, sheep or chickens is also ...


12

This sounds like a lot of work. The picture you show of the backyard looks nicer than some other lawns I have seen where people have a maintenance firm do the fertilizing and cutting. Just some points to note: if you raise the grade anything more than an inch or two this will kill any trees inside the raised area. Trees don't take grade changes well. to ...


10

All you need is a spade and a large plastic bucket like you buy drywall or paint in. This is a variation on a french drain and will not provide relief against the "one in a hundred year storm" but should work for most normal rainfalls. get a clean bucket of about twelve inch (thirty centimeter) diameter remove the bottom mark and remove the top six inches ...


9

Below is what I would consider a "Rolls-Royce" job, all of it might not need to be done if water doesn't puddle on the surface of the lawn... French drains on the back face/side of the upper and lower retaining walls: Dig 300 to 450mm (12 to 18inches) wide trenches. The trenches should run the length of the retaining walls. The trenches should bottom out ...


9

It appears your beds are pretty deep. At least a foot deep by my estimation. Most edibles you'll plant won't need to be that deep. 4-6" is enough for a lot of plants except for root vegetables but you can always add an extension in those areas. You don't have to make the whole bed deep just for a few potatoes or carrots. Since you have that much depth what ...


9

It depends on whether you want to keep the sod or no and if the ground is already pretty flat. I haven't used a sod cutter, but I think the ground has to be fairly level. I don't think it works well if there are dips in the ground. I think for 250sq/ft, which is around 16'x16', you can man up with a shovel and a pickmatic. Figure out where you want to have ...


8

What you need is a fast growing, fast spreading ground cover which is suitable to your environment. A suitable ground cover has the following benefits: Lock in moisture and nutrients at ground level Provide habitat for beneficial insects (think moist and decomposing versus hot dry and sandy, bugs are going to prefer to stay underground if there is little ...


8

One other option would be to work with what you have, rather than trying to drain the water away. You could put in a tree or a bed of plants that can tolerate having wet feet after a rain. They will absorb the water faster than your turf could. I don't know where you live and what plants would be appropriate for your location, but birch, dogwood and iris ...


8

First a question. What is going to be underneath your raised beds? Garden soil, lawn, patio, other? If you're going to get into raised bed vegetable gardening I strongly suggest you look into Square Foot Gardening. It makes a lot of things easier when it comes to raised bed gardening and can also save you a considerable amount of money. For one thing, you ...


8

You will want 3-4" diameter perforated pipes in the stone layer (also sloped 1"/10ft), and you will probably also want filter fabric on both sides of the stone layer, or it will become a layer of clay with rocks embedded in it soon enough. You might also want some much deeper "french drains" to deal with the water, rather than only having drainage 1-1.5 ...


7

Two things - I'm wondering whether you're going to use these trays just for starting seeds, and will be transplanting into other containers or the ground later, or whether you're intending to try to get something to grow permanently in them. If the latter, it won't work, they're not deep enough I'm afraid. The other thing that sprang to mind was the ...


7

This is only an idea. Most landscapers can help you with this issue and could provide better advice as they can be on site to check grading. The solution you need should have these characteristics: keeps water away from the house should keep sprinkler water on the property should allow high volumes of water to leave the property Your friend is four inch ...


7

Crushed gravel is the media of choice for providing drainage. What you want is to have the maximum amount of airspace in the drainage layer so water has somewhere to go. Normally you would use 5/8" or even 7/8" crushed gravel but 3/8" will do. Pea stone gravel would not be my first choice as it will pack down over time and provide less airspace than the ...


7

This is essentially a pot without drainage. Most herbs do not like to sit in wet soil so you need to have a drainage layer and a soil separator topped with a soil or soil less mix. Here are the things I have used for a drainage layer: peastone gravel - attractive but heavy styrofoam peanuts - light, colorful but maybe not what you want near something you ...


7

If you're living in desert country, you should be aiming to capture as much rainwater as possible, and prevent it from leaving your property if you can. If the property is sloping, you need to build swales on contour with the dirt excavated from the swale used to build berms on the downhill side of the swale where you then plant deep rooting plants to hold ...


7

Well, the correct way to conserve water is to watch your water, and make sure you don't have excess drainage. This of course takes time and experience. Till then, use measuring cups, or watering jugs that have measurements on them. Or, if watering with a hose, time yourself. A kitchen timer for example, can come in handy. Unless you have different soils ...


7

I haven't found any good reference sources, so this is just my personal experience. It ended up being too long for a comment, so I hope it's appropriate as an answer. I do this frequently, with both my indoor and outdoor potted plants. Especially outdoors, I tend to be lazy, so if I've already put away the hose or watering can, and notice something ...


7

There are different reasons why your ground could be so wet, I don't know the situation in Ireland, but here in the Netherlands we can have boggy ground as well. Different reasons are: High percentage of clay, or fine sand Hard layer because of not maintaining the soil properly Natural hard layer to prevent drainage of water Ground water level It depends ...


6

You can probably best meet your needs with a gravel driveway over a sand base. That will absorb the rain instead of dumping it off. It's the default driveway in places without storm drains (we have ditches) and works well. We have one about 200 feet long, which is short for our neighbourhood, and: snow blowing is no problem though you will want to set the ...


6

To be honest, I think this is impossible. You want something that is frost resistant - really that means a native or similar from other high latitude areas. That limits you to very slow growing plants or moss. The first will not last long - drive over once and it will kill years of growth. Moss will not keep warm. In fact all plants are going to go dormant ...


6

I'm a master gardener, so let me just say for the future (or if you're comfortable transplanting your Lilac) always, always use a clay pot with drainage. If you aren't comfortable trying to transplant your Lilac you need to put in some drainage holes. The plant will not survive without them. Good luck, happy gardening:)


6

First option: Treat the wood to stop it from rotting and just proceed as you intend to. The downside to this is soil contamination if you intend to grow edible plants. Second option: The cheaters way; buy a secondary inner container and just keep the box as decorative. You could even go for cheap plastic pots on the inside. Add some rocks / pebbles if you ...


6

Its pretty well known how plowpan reduces crop yields and is why many farmers subsoil their fields. Plowpan is the hard layer of soil 6-7 inches down caused by the repeated plowing at the same depth. Subsoiling breaks up that layer http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VKsK3u_JWE Image taken from: http://www.soilandhealth.org/03sov/0302hsted/030201/...


6

The minimum slope that I recommend is two percent, or 1/4 inch per foot. As an example, the grade at a spot four feet away from your house should be one inch lower than the grade next to your house. This will do for most houses with soil that will absorb water readily. For your 7 metre garden (~ 22.9 feet) this would be no more than a 6" drop. Keep in mind ...


6

Yes, there is a reason, and its a pretty obvious one. Holes in the bottom of the pot ensure that no water is left sitting at the bottom - holes in the side, even if you get really close to the base, will inevitably leave a millimetre or so undrained. You could probably get round that by using horticultural grit or gravel at the bottom of the pot though, it ...


6

I would also suggest that you only water the plants in the morning when the excess water will evaporate in the sunlight. I made this mistake several times with midnight watering which caused my salvia, Rosemary and lemon verbena to drown first then get fungal disease.


6

Dig some trenches at about one foot (~30 CM spacing) parallel to each other from the higher point to a lower point. The trenches should be about six inches (~15 CM wide) line the trenches with landscape fabric or geotextile add four inch drain pipe, perforated with a sleeve fill with crushed gravel, 5/8 inch or 7/8 inch diameter, without any fine crushed ...


6

I'm not sure about the specific species, but they appear to be worms from the family Enchytraeidae (commonly known as potworms). They are not earthworms, but similar. They feed on/live in decayed organic matter, and do not harm plants. They need moisture to thrive, and prefer a low pH. When the conditions are right, they tend to multiply rapidly. They are ...


6

Not remotely related. The level of the water table has nothing to do with how well the soil drains. High water table can be in clay that doesn't drain very well at all, or in a gravel pit that drains exceedingly well. If you filled a bathtub with each soil and set the water level to 4 inches from the top, it would be the same place for ether type. If you ...


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