13

This may seem odd, but it has worked for me. Place the dog's feces in the hole they dug, then cover it back up. You may have to do this many times if they continually dig there holes in different places. At some point your dog will dig in a hole that you have covered up once before. At this point they will be disgusted by what they find and will learn to ...


11

The problem is the mulch - cats like anything that's loose and which they can scratch and move around easily, so freshly dug soil, mulch, pea shingle, anything like that is the equivalent of cat litter so far as they're concerned. The best mulch to use to discourage cats is probably coca shell, if that's available - that has a habit of 'bonding' together to ...


11

This year I have had such a problem. I am having partial success with "Ultrasonic Motion-Activated" system as proposed by Mike Perry. By partial I mean that the cats seem to stop pooping in the places where the system is installed, but move to other "corners" of the garden. I have moved the machine 3 times for now, the cats haven't yet returned to the ...


4

Bitter apple has been recommended to me but has never worked in deterring my dog from accidents, digging or nosing around where he doesn't belong. A dog is a dog - they are going to dig. If you want to train him/her not to on your sod, carry a water spray bottle wherever you go, be with the dog when you let him out and spray him well the minute he begins ...


4

The most effective method is a sprinkler linked to a movement detector which turns on when it detects movement in the area, and stops when movement ceases. There are several available at various prices (Amazon has a range) and they're sold as motion detector sprinklers. Link below is to Amazon in the UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=...


4

Go talk to your neighbor. Tell them you've got plants that are poisonous to cats (Do you have daylillies, canna, iris, calla lilly...I just learned these are very toxic to cats) and ask that they keep their cat indoors. Outdoor cats have very short lives. Otherwise get a covered cat box, fill it with cat litter and put it close to your property line. ...


4

I have a similar problem with cats in my yard. I've read a number of things that can help, but first I'll explain what does help for me (I'm not sure about for raccoons, though): Grow thick plants that are at least a couple feet tall, wherein the cats cannot step anywhere without stepping on 2'+ tall plants. I'm not sure exactly why this deters cats, since ...


4

Well, yes, plain green can be boring, but variegated green is a bit more interesting, so a Spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum) will be fine. Better still, get one of those and a plain green plant with large leaves (Cast Iron plant maybe) and arrange them next to each other - the contrast will be interesting. Bromeliads (Guzmania lingulata for instance) are ...


4

Yes, and they look like this: It has the added benefits of retaining moisture/raising humidity and raising soil and air temps.. Remove the lid once or twice a day to get fresh air. They can be found online and in local nurseries, etc. I searched for "plant tray with cover".


3

I've had excellent luck with Rosemary. Although only green (I've never been able to get it to flower), cats hate the smell and dislike touching it. For awhile, we had two rosemaries bookending a row of other, smaller plants. But cats being cats, they realized that they only had to knock over a rosemary to get to the salad greens next to them. You could also ...


3

If you have enough light, ginger (in several varieties) has nice flowers, and when there were kittens around it was a favored kitten jungle in a 16 gallon pot. If you lack sufficient light, you won't get flowers. Three examples are: Zingiber officinale Hedychium coronarium Hedychium gardnerianum I can also second Bamboo's mention of Saintpaulias, which do ...


3

Dogs dig for a number of reasons. Sometimes it is because of a scent, but more often they are just bored. Digging is also a natural activity for dogs, so you are working against nature by trying to stop it. The other answers have some good ideas for deterring the dog - I've also heard of people pouring cayenne pepper around the areas they dig. An E-...


3

Tdc, at 6 years old, your cat should still be running about like a 2 year old. Cats are middle aged to old when they get to 9 years and onwards, so if your cat is having difficulty moving about, I suggest a trip to the vets or the local RSPCA/PDSA clinic. It's also very odd for any cat to scratch in grass - they always prefer loose material to do their ...


3

FYI: The comfrey I'm talking about is the kind that doesn't reseed. I'm not familiar with other kinds. I'm pretty sure a very strong and well-established comfrey plant could indeed live through a stampede (or several; daily or a regular basis might be pushing it), since it's the roots that keep them alive. However, in my experience, you can't count on every ...


3

Goats are incredible. Depends on what kind of shrubs and trees you have. If goats are fed regularly they won't necessarily destroy, just prune. Rabbits are great at pruning the underside of shrubs. Again, trouble is augmented by feeding them...although I don't necessarily recommend feeding bunnies... The underside of shrubs usually produces little food ...


3

Side-oats Grama and Blue Grama are both native to Texas and known to occur in Travis County. They tolerate full sun and dry soil, should grow readily from seed when sown on warm soil in the spring, and reach 1-2 feet in height. I had good experience with side-oats last year even after sowing in late June (!) at the beginning of a blazing-hot Kansas summer. ...


3

I buy cheap cinnamon from the dollar store and sprinkle it around. I have to redo it after every rain. It really does work.


2

Its the behavior of the cats you want to change. Its pretty hard to stop them pooping everywhere without trying to stop them coming in. So if you like have cats in your garden you'll have to put up with it. When we moved house we got loads of cat poo, in a largeish city garden. Using scent markers - tiger urine etc - requires to much and has to be reapplied....


2

What about dog rocks? They sell these at the vets in the UK, and provided your dog doesn't refuse to drink the water to which they've been added, they do a good job of neutralising dog urine before it exits the body.


2

I'm thinking that maybe adding a natural, humane irritant to the earth. Cayenne pepper spray even keeps cats away from unwanted areas. I'm sure a lot of things would deter them as well.


2

There are many reasons why this may be happening. Rabbits, squirrels, mice/voles, cut worms, snails/slugs, etc. You will have to observe to see if there are foot marks in the soil or by going out at night with a flash light and looking under the leaves. As suggested by stormy, if you can cover these with a row cloth, the likelihood of damage from rabbits, ...


2

Look, I was raised on a wilderness ranch with cattle, horses, sandhill cranes...heaven. No electricity!! 6000 acres a pristine pond/spring where 'Mares Eggs' grew...rare. No ATV'S. We did have a funky Willy jeep to play with otherwise it was all done via horse back. All my life I've raised plants, taken care of other people's landscapes, trained others ...


2

Without a picture I will hazard a guess that that plant will be fine. the chewing would have to have been the entire circumference to kill the plant...we need to know what plant this is, its environment, definitely a picture. Is the stem herbaceous or is it woody? Please send a picture and tell us every detail you could imagine about your situation and ...


1

There are training aids that deter animals, by scent, that may further protect the seedlings. Bonide's Go Away is the one I see most often and you could sprinkle it in a small perimeter around your plant tray. It smells strongly of cinnamon and may make you sneeze/cough if you inhale any of the dust while sprinkling the product indoors, however.


1

You could always winter sow, if they're indoor cats. Or, you could use a small greenhouse. I use a Strong Camel greenhouse (unheated) in southwestern Idaho for seed-starting in containers to be transplanted into the garden in May or so (yes, you can use them when it's still freezing, but you'll probably not want it to get colder than 27° F. unless you're ...


1

As mentioned above I've also read that cayenne pepper spray will deter raccoons. In addition, perhaps you can determine the reason for the visit in the first place. Make sure trash cans have secure lids, rinse out the trash can if it gets dirty to remove any food odors, don't put trash out at night, clean up food debris from yard like fallen berries and ...


1

I have daffodils in my garden. They do not repel chipmunks or squirrels. They are not eaten by rabbits or deer in most circumstances due to the alkaloids in them. Chipmunks will spend time in your garden if you are providing any combination of food/shelter/water. If you remove or restrict access to the things they eat which include: seed and nuts, bird ...


1

Te best and most effective would be to kill them, but not everybody likes to do that and there is some other option. You can plant some plants that chipmunks hate. The 2 best are narcissus flowers or daffodils. Narcissus is the best because the are toxic alkaloids and calcium-oxalate crystals in them (do not think it kills them). There is something called U ...


1

This works for me. You can put little plastic containers of cinnamon where the cats go. They don't like the smell. Make sure the containers are small and have tiny holes so the odor escapes. Change the cinnamon after 2-3 rains. Containers should minimize spillage. You can also take potted plants, sprinkle the dirt in them with cinnamon, and place those ...


1

I'm from Australia, I've got 5 Catahoulas and I tried so many different ways to stop my dogs from digging. In the end I gave them a 3m × 3m patch of dirt in the back corner of my yard and buried some new toys and a few bones. I think the best way is keeping them busy and well exercised but sometimes it's not that easy.


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