9

Lot's of issues Don't use it for anything, it's an environmental hazard. Just get rid of it in the least impactful way. Used motor oil has a plethora of bad chemicals and compounds in it that eliminate for another use once it has been inside your engine for an extended period of time. Aside from the hydrocarbons lead phosphorous berium zinc bromine ...


5

A lot of commercial hothouses burn used motor oil - which is worse than new stuff. If done correctly its quite safe to eat the fruits produced, but its not great for the environment. There are quite a few bad things in it - in a commercial greenhouse heater these are ducted out the hothouse. That said if the units are not looked after properly, they can ...


5

Composting is a pretty healthy alternative. Here in the UK you can buy electric garden shredders for under £100, allowing you to compost almost anything. In the long run you'll save on buying motor oil. I've also seen people woodburning stoves by dousing in cooking oil, if it's edible then the residues left should be safe enough.


4

Cut some slices from the trunk, polish them up, carve or don't or hire that out, hang on wires, give your wife earrings for the next anniversary. Or beads, or (if there's enough wood) make pocketknife handle slabs, cufflinks etc... much nicer than a dead stick collecting dust in a vase, IMHO. I don't know how much wood you have, but "jewelry items" don't ...


4

I know someone who used regular firewood to get the kind of fire needed to burn a bunch of fresh tree branches. It seems to work. While maybe not the most efficient method in some regards, you should save a lot of time over most methods. I understand there's not always room to compost, and you may not have a truck to haul the branches away. And, you may not ...


3

Looks very professional, especially since you say you are a first-time gardener. If you don't expect anymore harvest (no flowers, no fruits anymore), you can get rid of the plants. They are indeed suitable for composting, if you know anyone that wants it for their compost, it will be a good source of 'greens'. You can also let the plants die, after the ...


3

Good to ask this question...please do not think about throwing the chips into the creek. Not only would this disturb the ecology but this is usually against the 'law'...do you have neighbors also on this creek? Where are you living, David? I wouldn't BUY a chipper, I would go rent one for a day. Unless you plan on getting into the chipping business? ...


3

Stick it on the compost heap - it hasn't fruited, so there's no question of seeds, they're inside the fruits. I'm a bit curious as to why you kept in the house and didn't put it outside during the summer months, where it would have been much more likely to fruit though - they're not meant to be houseplants, though they can be grown in greenhouses. They are ...


3

The most efficient way for disposing cuttings and avoid to disturb neighbors with the smoke is to use a shredder for the smaller branches. You can then use it mixed with mulch to fertilize you trees or garden. Then you can keep the big ones to dry and burn in your BBQ or for the bonfire. I also read that you could bury the branches and plant directly on ...


3

I own property with a lot of poison ivy, I first discovered it by triming brush and found myself standing in a field of it. I have been using tecnu for many years and have not gotten the poison ivy rash. I take a bath with it. The hard part is washing it off with cool water. Tecnu is also good for fire ant bites. I buy my tecnu from Gemplers in the 32 oz ...


2

Trim your bougainvillea Take an ample amount of cuttings and put them in a very large plastic garbage pail. Then, take your electric trimmer and move it around the interior of the garbage pail cutting the large branches into small pieces. When the pieces are small enough, empty the garbage pail into a large plastic bag. Repeat with another ample amount of ...


1

You are asking for a recommendation so I will answer this with what I would do. First thing to try, calling your local trash hauler or your county or whoever regulates trash hauling services and asking them what materials they would take in your regular trash and what is recyclable. Then I would dig a hole deep enough to bury the material deeply enough ...


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