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2

Leaf miners for sure, 100%. If you feed your beets well with good quality fertilizer they can outgrow miners and have an awesome crop still, of both leaves and roots. Liquid seaweed, compost tea, a good all purpose fertilizer, ect or any combo of the above can work.


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Looks like too much water, or a deficiency..try some chelated iron and/or some epsom salt magnesium sulfate even a "miracle grow type" fertilizer can help the issue some, but will take more applications to get the results you want but i wouldn't do so until next water cycle, or in the heat of the day..a good indicator of when to water tomatoes is ...


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I think your cactus has rot, and it will spread to the unaffected ones if you don't take action. I would separate the affected one from the two healthy ones, to prevent spreading. The one that is affected can be saved by cutting off the upper part (which is still healthy green), and try to let it grow roots (propagation by cuttings). While you are cutting, ...


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Fungus usually comes from too much humidity, make sure not to spray your corn with water, especially when its been rainy or very humid.. consan or a copper fungicide may help you, but more so in the future..i wouldn't want to eat corn with high copper or fungicide levels but preventative treatment may help in future seasons


28

That's corn smut, a fungus. It's edible and a part of Mexican cuisine. I doubt that you need to notify the authorities, but given that USDA has been trying for decades to eradicate it in the US, it's not a bad idea to visit your state's Dept of Agriculture website just to make sure. Wikipedia has an entry on it, although it does not discuss how to prevent it ...


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I'm going to say your soil is too rich. If you have actually potted it in straight compost it is far too rich and probably doesn't drain adequately. I recommend getting some cactus/succulent soil and starting over.


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The problem here is overwatering. Aloe is a succulent plant, which means it can cope very well with drought. By keeping the soil wet for too long the roots will rot and you'll get red leaves and brown tips. The best advice is to have a pot and soil with good drainage. Try to let the soil dry out between watering, if not sure feel finger deep. By doubt don't ...


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You may be correct regarding the additional moisture. And, it could be from more than one thing: Sometimes very slight pressure on on a tip can affect the tissue. Your Aloe could also be withdrawing energy to use for growth stimulated and required by the resetting. Possibly the container could have something in it or on it; also, if the original container ...


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This could be verticillium wilt, which causes sudden death of individual branches. Here's some info. It's important that you read the link, because it contains a diagnostic test that you can use to determine whether your lilac does indeed suffer from a verticillium infection. If your lilac fails the test (no streaking on the twigs), then your plant may ...


1

Good question and illustration, and the excellent closer view illustrations are very helpful! An older illustration could be helpful for comparison to see how the features are changing as they form. The condition appears to be from rootlet arrays forming. Apple Gall can sometimes outwardly appear similar at a certain stage. Based on the additional ...


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Your Japanese Lilac may be suffering from Bacterial Lilac Blight, based on the clear illustration & additional description, and may be saveable! Blight can get into a Lilac through open abrasions or insects etc, and moves through the tissues in the plant. The progess of Blight can be very rapid; Sometimes it will take an entire Lilac, other times several ...


1

It looks like it could be Alternaria, by the symptoms (especially the yellowing lower leaves). Alternaria is a genus of fungus that infects plants, and can even cause issues for humans. It's the closest thing in appearance I know about to what I'm seeing on your plants. Anthracnose is another possibility (it's a similar fungus). They're both common fruit rot ...


1

If you look at the underside of the leaves visible in your second picture and at the stem in the bottom right of the last picture, you have what looks to me like powdery mildew. All four of the plants you mention are susceptible to it, in my experience. Counterintuitively, hot dry conditions are perfect for it. My zucchini have it bad this year and I am ...


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Squash borers, they are inside the stems/vines. The only way to see them is split the vine longitudinally, which actually is a good way to get the large ones. The vines will continue growing after being split. Probing in the center of the vines with a wire ,like a coat hanger is a good way to kill big ones. Dust the vines ( not flowers) with Sevin dust to ...


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To me, this looks like normal growth, these trees will go through the natural "shedding" process as they grow. Those trees do not appear to be even close to full-grown yet and if there are not small brown fungal spores that turn grey or black then that's good if you notice that they do contract the disease, unfortunately, the best thing to do is ...


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The photo looks normal; the fronds that lay against the surface turn brown . They do not stay green like the regular fronds. I have a very large one, the only problem it ever had is scale insects .About the only way I know to kill them is scrape them off with a finger nail . So ,check for scale occasionally .


2

There seems to be new bark growing where the old has come off. If the bald area extends right round the tree and there is no new bark growing underneath, the tree will not live long, but you don't mention any other visible problems with your trees so that seems unlikely. Your picture only shows half the circumference of the tree trunk, of course. If there is ...


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