29

That's corn smut, a fungus. It's edible and a part of Mexican cuisine. I doubt that you need to notify the authorities, but given that USDA has been trying for decades to eradicate it in the US, it's not a bad idea to visit your state's Dept of Agriculture website just to make sure. Wikipedia has an entry on it, although it does not discuss how to prevent it ...


5

The bark looks like its on an ash tree, not an elm tree. Could this be correct? If it's an ash, then I suggest a bad (and fatal) infestation of emerald ash borer. I've seen this kind of bark loss all over the city in which I live - including on four of my own mature ash trees. It does look like you have borer exit holes in the last photo, particularly the ...


5

Organic mulch should not result in plant loss for any reason, unless the mulch is applied too thickly up against the crown or stem of an herbaceous plant. My experience with cocoa bean hulls is that a very young/small annual can succumb to rot if that happens; I assume that the same issue would occur with rice hulls (cocoa bean hulls go through a period of ...


4

Sclerotinia sclerotinorum, White Mold Without being able to see much detail, this particular fungus, White Mold may be what you have. It is rare for this fungus to bother mature trees but since your tree is still immature, this is another fungus to consider. Not at all a cool fungus. If this is a correct ID you have to be incredibly careful about ...


4

It's called spindle galls, it is caused by mites. Tiny mites live in these galls, and lay eggs there. It is usually not something to worry about, although the sight of it might not be very nice. Here you can find some more information.


3

The cotyledon (the first leaf like green) will wilt and fade with time. That should be expected. That being said the other leaves are showing stress. There may more than one factor that is stressing it. One it's the wrong time of the year. If you are in the Northern Hemisphere it is early for sunflowers to start to grow. It may be the temperatures ...


3

It is a fungus, but it's not harmless - unfortunately, this will have been at work inside your tree for quite a while, digesting the wood. What you see on the outside as these white deposits are the fruiting bodies because the fungus is mature enough now to produce them, and it is a signal that your tree is dying. If it is somewhere it can fall onto someone ...


3

Those tiny grasshopper-looking jerks are thrips. The spots are from thrips piercing the leaf with their mouths and sucking out the contents. As far as I know, the leaves are safe to eat. I would just wash them to remove the buggers and their frass. It’s probably an annual problem because thrips can overwinter under plant debris or mulch. Come spring, ...


3

I would remark that what you call the 3 cut method is not a magic way to prune a tree. A wound is a wound, pruning is a way human beeing manage a tree, and pruning always causes a wound. There is a good way of doing it and a really bad way of doing it. Modern Arboriculture by Shigo (what I think you mean by 3 steps cut) describes a model, based on ...


3

Those brown bumps are scale insects, and yes they can spread to other plants as well. You can try to wipe 'em off with a wet cloth, or you can use poison from the store. It is hard to get rid of them completely, but keeping it under control by wiping them off should give your plant a bit of time to recover. You might want to learn more about scale ...


3

It looks like they may have gotten sprayed with something toxic to them, like a cleaner or disinfectant....it looks like it killed part of the stem. That's a possible cause, the effect is some die-off of stem tissues, regardless of how. Tomatoes will root all along the stems where they are in contact with soil. I've even rooted cuttings as an experiment....


3

I would hazard an educated guess that you are over fertilizing the plant. Vitax Clematis feed is a slow release formulation, and lasts for 3 months. Feeding with Tomorite monthly as well is somewhat of an overkill, so I suggest you stop using the Tomorite and don't feed at all again this year, not even with the Vitax. Keep the plant well watered to try to ...


2

If there was amber coloured fluid seeping out from somewhere,that's gummosis, and it's common on stone fruit trees. Gummosis can be non specific, but the usual causes are cracks in the bark (maybe from a hard winter), and poor pruning cuts allowing bacteria to enter the sap stream. I would suggest poor pruning cuts are the likely cause in this case. A tree ...


2

The stippling appears to be spider mite. Look for small webbing under the leaves. I really can't tell from your pictures if this is definitely the problem, but it is my best educated guess. IF you do find spider mite webbing, move it away from the rest of your plants. Give it a a really good washing, spraying off the bottom and top of each leave with ...


2

Sometimes it is quite difficult to move plants without causing some distress to the balance of the plant by damaging the roots. Ideally the pot will be full of roots so that when the plant is turned out the root ball stays intact and goes right into the perfect hole in the ground and the shock is minimal. More frequently the root ball is loose and it comes ...


2

Leaf miners for sure, 100%. If you feed your beets well with good quality fertilizer they can outgrow miners and have an awesome crop still, of both leaves and roots. Liquid seaweed, compost tea, a good all purpose fertilizer, ect or any combo of the above can work.


2

It is probably Pink Wax Scale insect, they're the right shape, though the colour varies from greyish pink to pink; this infestation is not uncommon on Lilly Pilly. I've never seen them quite such a glorious shade of lilac pink before though,they look quite pretty; you may see lots of ants crawling on the tree, which would confirm it is scale -they like the ...


2

Well I would say neither bacterial nor fungal. Reason being that the leaf of Pachypodium is typically tropical in that it is thick with a waxy/shiny/hard coat surface. It's really quite difficult for an infection to get from the outside in. Much more likely for problems to arise on the inside and display signs through the most visible parts later. Recall ...


2

I think it looks like damage from too much direct sunlight. Orchids love lots of bright, but indirect sunlight. Tropical Orchid's natural habitat is the jungle floor, where they get lots of dappled, but little direct sunlight through the tree canopy. The best way to add shade for orchids getting light from a south or west facing window is is to hang a sheer ...


2

In the UK, the recommended time for pruning plum trees is April or July, but definitely not at other times because of the risk of silverleaf disease. I'm not sure that is canker, and its definitely not bacterial canker at the moment because there's no sign of dampness or oozing from the area. However, the bark has gone for a reason and that area will be ...


2

Avocados are soft-leaved tropicals so they are very sensitive to water reserves. Any even brief interruption of sap to the leaves can result in some yellowing and browning and drying of leaves. Root interference as a result of repotting can be detrimental. Your plants look tall, and the one visible pot looks relatively small compared to the tree it is ...


2

This will be a good news contribution. As far as we know, fireblight is not present in Australia. Fireblight would usually present itself as completely dried out twigs in spring during blossom time and in spots in the tree where it entered, not over the whole tree at the same time unless you missed it a few months ago. Watch carefully as the leaves fall; if ...


2

Tomatoes are hyper sensitive to herbicides , it can drift hundreds of feet from an application area and affect tomatoes. And, yes, herbicide in a compost can affect them. My son got some free rich garden compost from a retirement home that was closing down a garden area ; filled his pickup truck. He used it as addition to a few raised vegetable beds. Almost ...


2

No, this is not blight. Caused by normal everyday fungus and it is called Shot hole as well as other names. A drop of liquid that happens to have the fungal spores in it splashes upon the leaves. The plant itself manages this fungus by causing the spot to die and fall out leaving a blank hole. Pretty cool. Definitely no big deal. What I am seeing, ...


2

It sounds/looks like your plant has a fungal leaf spot problem. The little black spots are called fruiting centers. That is where the fungus creates and sends out new fungal spores to infect other parts of the leaf and spread to new leaves. Stop scraping off the black spots! You are only helping new fungal spores to get airborne. Fungus problems can often ...


2

Don't know for sure, but you might want to do a search for clematis leaf miner.


2

There seems to be new bark growing where the old has come off. If the bald area extends right round the tree and there is no new bark growing underneath, the tree will not live long, but you don't mention any other visible problems with your trees so that seems unlikely. Your picture only shows half the circumference of the tree trunk, of course. If there is ...


2

Fungus usually comes from too much humidity, make sure not to spray your corn with water, especially when its been rainy or very humid.. consan or a copper fungicide may help you, but more so in the future..i wouldn't want to eat corn with high copper or fungicide levels but preventative treatment may help in future seasons


2

I think your cactus has rot, and it will spread to the unaffected ones if you don't take action. I would separate the affected one from the two healthy ones, to prevent spreading. The one that is affected can be saved by cutting off the upper part (which is still healthy green), and try to let it grow roots (propagation by cuttings). While you are cutting, ...


1

It looks like early blight, which is a fungus. I usually control by being careful not to wet the plants when watering (only water the mulch around them), and growing them in a polytunnel which keeps them dry and relatively free of spores. Infected plants can sometimes be saved by removing the affected parts, being careful not to spread spores to unaffected ...


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