29

That's corn smut, a fungus. It's edible and a part of Mexican cuisine. I doubt that you need to notify the authorities, but given that USDA has been trying for decades to eradicate it in the US, it's not a bad idea to visit your state's Dept of Agriculture website just to make sure. Wikipedia has an entry on it, although it does not discuss how to prevent it ...


5

Organic mulch should not result in plant loss for any reason, unless the mulch is applied too thickly up against the crown or stem of an herbaceous plant. My experience with cocoa bean hulls is that a very young/small annual can succumb to rot if that happens; I assume that the same issue would occur with rice hulls (cocoa bean hulls go through a period of ...


4

Ticks are a concern for gardeners since the act of gardening might encourage ticks where they might not otherwise be. One thing you might do is follow the sampling techniques used by local natural resource authorities - they may drag a cloth across the area, and this motion causes ticks to land on the cloth where they can be counted. Likely in a closely ...


3

I would hazard an educated guess that you are over fertilizing the plant. Vitax Clematis feed is a slow release formulation, and lasts for 3 months. Feeding with Tomorite monthly as well is somewhat of an overkill, so I suggest you stop using the Tomorite and don't feed at all again this year, not even with the Vitax. Keep the plant well watered to try to ...


3

It looks like they may have gotten sprayed with something toxic to them, like a cleaner or disinfectant....it looks like it killed part of the stem. That's a possible cause, the effect is some die-off of stem tissues, regardless of how. Tomatoes will root all along the stems where they are in contact with soil. I've even rooted cuttings as an experiment....


3

150 gallons at 4 litres per gallon makes over 500 litres or 8 domestic garbage bins of soil; this puts the project on the border between home gardening and small commercial, so you might get some help from the local agriculture extension office. Even a suggestion for concrete identification of the pathogen would help since then you have a clearly defined ...


2

I think it looks like damage from too much direct sunlight. Orchids love lots of bright, but indirect sunlight. Tropical Orchid's natural habitat is the jungle floor, where they get lots of dappled, but little direct sunlight through the tree canopy. The best way to add shade for orchids getting light from a south or west facing window is is to hang a sheer ...


2

Leaf miners for sure, 100%. If you feed your beets well with good quality fertilizer they can outgrow miners and have an awesome crop still, of both leaves and roots. Liquid seaweed, compost tea, a good all purpose fertilizer, ect or any combo of the above can work.


2

There seems to be new bark growing where the old has come off. If the bald area extends right round the tree and there is no new bark growing underneath, the tree will not live long, but you don't mention any other visible problems with your trees so that seems unlikely. Your picture only shows half the circumference of the tree trunk, of course. If there is ...


2

I think your cactus has rot, and it will spread to the unaffected ones if you don't take action. I would separate the affected one from the two healthy ones, to prevent spreading. The one that is affected can be saved by cutting off the upper part (which is still healthy green), and try to let it grow roots (propagation by cuttings). While you are cutting, ...


2

Fungus usually comes from too much humidity, make sure not to spray your corn with water, especially when its been rainy or very humid.. consan or a copper fungicide may help you, but more so in the future..i wouldn't want to eat corn with high copper or fungicide levels but preventative treatment may help in future seasons


2

Don't know for sure, but you might want to do a search for clematis leaf miner.


2

Does it rain often where you're from? Or is that water from you? Does the spotted one receive more sunlight than the other orchid in the back? The roots look healthy. If it rains frequently where you are, I would suggest dialing back your own watering. If that's already happening, I would suggest moving it to another tree -- they tend to love bright ...


2

They're galls and are probably caused by insects or mites. Unfortunately you can't do anything about it I'm afraid (the leaf damage is permanent and irreversible and by the time you notice it chances are that the bug that has triggered the change has already left). The only possible "treatment" for the leaves is to remove them and a possible ...


2

My parsley goes like this after it has had an attack of greenfly, probably because they suck the sap out of the plant. I usually treat it with a biological spray, cut off the affected leaves and stems and discard them, and the plant recovers with rest. (Don’t use it for eating during this period). Sometimes the greenfly are so small they don’t notice until ...


2

Plants have evolved on earth to grow in two stages during a 24 hour period: first photosynthesis in light and then respiration in darkness. Exposed to continuous light the photosynthesis continues; the respiration being equally important to release gases and continue the second part of the internal chemistry cannot proceed normally in some cases. The result ...


2

It looks like classic tip burn from too much light and heat. Combine with the overall small leaves and this points to either lights too close to the plants, the wrong type of light generating large amounts of heat, or having the lights on for too long. If the plants are exposed to 24 hours of light and heat they have no chance to respire properly; they have ...


2

Its just lichen, not a problem. Search this site for previous answers on this.


1

@Kevinsky provided a link in their answer to a similar question that you may find helpful - the specific link is from the Morton Arboretum and discusses seasonal needle drop. It also says that, in times of drought, evergreens will lose needles or, in the case or arbs, branchlets., which is what your arbs are doing. I think your issue may be with watering, ...


1

It looks like fungus . Any wood it is on was likely dead before the fungus started growing. Scale are discrete insects , those I have seen on branches are 3 to 4 mm long and many more scales were on nearby leaves. There may be some lichen with the pictured fungus. Once fungus is in a tree I don't know of any fix. I did have an oak about the size of your tree ...


1

What have you used for fertilizer? What formulation? This plant is suffering from lack of Phosphorus and Nitrogen, possible Potassium. What is the pH of your soil? One has to apply BALANCED fertilizer for all plants in the right amount and the right percentages. It is clear, your plant is lacking nitrogen and phosphorous. Where fertilizer is concerned ...


1

You may be correct regarding the rainy conditions, and additional moisture. And the condition could be being caused by more than one factor; eg, sometimes very slight pressure on a tip can affect the tissue, and your Aloe could also be withdrawing energy to use for new growth stimulated by and required by the replanting. Possibly the container could have ...


1

Good question and illustration, and the excellent closer view illustrations are very helpful! An older illustration could be helpful for comparison to see how the features are changing as they form. The condition appears to be from rootlet arrays forming. Apple Gall can sometimes outwardly appear similar at a certain stage. Based on the additional ...


1

Your Japanese Lilac may be suffering from Bacterial Lilac Blight, based on the clear illustration & additional description, and your Lilac may be saveable! Some Lilacs survive Lilac Blight, especially with care. Blight can get into a Lilac through open abrasions or from insects etc, & moves through the tissues in the plant, and progess can be very ...


1

It looks like it could be Alternaria, by the symptoms (especially the yellowing lower leaves). Alternaria is a genus of fungus that infects plants, and can even cause issues for humans. It's the closest thing in appearance I know about to what I'm seeing on your plants. Anthracnose is another possibility (it's a similar fungus). They're both common fruit rot ...


1

If you look at the underside of the leaves visible in your second picture and at the stem in the bottom right of the last picture, you have what looks to me like powdery mildew. All four of the plants you mention are susceptible to it, in my experience. Counterintuitively, hot dry conditions are perfect for it. My zucchini have it bad this year and I am ...


1

The ample fruit is a good sign. It may be in need of a bit more water or a bit more nutrient to support the fruit growth. It may be drawing from the foliage to support the fruit. And check around the base & remove any old leaves etc to help air flow. Would avoid pruning until its dormant, and then only a mild prune. If the fruit size has changed just ...


1

The two lichens I'm spotting here are Xanthoria Parietina and Foliose lichen. They are harmless and very common to find on tree branches.


1

Looks like two sorts of lichens; generally regarded as harmless to the tree. I have not yet found any reports showing them to be bad for trees.


1

Your tomato plants may not need to have calcium applied to the soil they're growing in; an erratic or inadequate watering regime is most often the cause of blossom end rot, as well as some varieties of tomatoes being more susceptible to this problem. Without regular and sufficient supplies of water, the plant is unable to take up calcium from the soil and ...


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