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5

Stormy must be asleep. The first thing (too late for you now): see if a landscaper would have come and removed the uncut, unpoisoned bush for the sake of getting the bush and selling it to another customer. A Stormy stock theme. They might even have filled the hole. You get worn out - well, keep at it and you'll get into better shape. Give up and you won't. ...


5

You never cut a tree that you are trying to remove down to the base. Remember that part for the future. Tools I use (and all of them in the process) •Spade/square mouth sharp flat head short shaft 'D' •Lopper/ •Axe/ •Hand held pruning saw 9"blade •Secateurs •Pry bar •Grub hoe/with pick end •-round mouth shovel/ pointed head end/ long straight handle •Rake •...


5

You either need to reapply a stump killer, or have the stumps ground out; another factor to consider when using stump killers is the variety of shrub you want to remove, because some have suckering roots (Lilac for instance) so sometimes, suckers continue to grow a distance away off major roots beneath the soil. You should be able to find someone to come ...


5

I've never found anything better than a digging bar for stony soil. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digging_bar If you need to hack through big roots you may want something sharper or loppers, but it can pulverize roots that are less than 2 inches pretty well. I have a tough pair of ratcheting loppers that I use for big underground roots.


4

I second all the other ideas too. My go to tool for medium sized shrubs is a cutting mattock, which is essentially an axe on one side and a mattock on the other. That's great for roots on the surface. When you get through some of the top roots I look for my digging bar. Also called a rock bar, tamping bar etc. It's a long steel rod that has a blade on ...


4

I would add as much as possible, however much that happens to be, as once the roses are established, they won't appreciate more being dug in around their roots, and using compost as mulch, while it works over time, is a slower way of incorporating it into the soil.


4

Mulching with largish rocks (3-4 inches in diameter or better) can help keep them out of your potted plants. If you pick rounded river rocks or other interesting stones, it can also create an attractive accent for your containers.


3

You can use a hot pepper repellent spray, which uses the active ingredient, capsaicin (the compound extracted from hot peppers). There are commercial pepper sprays available, or you can mix up your own. There are a number of recipes available online, which use capsaicin, in some form (eg. cayenne, hot sauce, crushed red pepper flakes, etc.). Wear gloves ...


3

Please don't repeat the dripline myth - as a landscape architect I'm continually trying to to protect (and repair damage to) trees where the roots have been cut back to the dripline. The system I use is called the Critical Root Zone system (a utility standard in the UK) and is quite simple to work out: Measure tree trunk diameter at 1.3metres (52 inches) ...


3

First: have you tried using a post driver like this one? I've got really rocky ground too, and I know what you mean about getting a hammer on it. The post driver may help you get your force directed into the stake properly. If you want less manual labor, you could see if you can rent a powered post driver like this. I've never used one, but I'd guess you'll ...


3

I have sandy soil in a rainforest ( East TX ), so digging a hole is always a challenge. I always take a shears and often a "loper" ( 2 ft handles , lever action) with the spade. When encountering 2 in. + roots I have cut them with a saw but that is work so I try to shift the hole. You also want a fiberglass handle on your spade. I have also ground an edge ...


2

There are also manual and powered drills used for digging holes. Manual drills are suitable for digging few holes in soft dirt without obstacles. Petrol drills has the advantage of drilling holes much faster compared to manual drills. I'd suggest you find someone to help you because it is quite heavy to lift it from ground together with drilled dirt. ...


2

I'm pretty sure that I clearly understand what you want, but I find your disbelief at the fact that nobody makes it baffling. What you seem to think you want is predicated on dead level ground to run on - which is incredibly uncommon in actual practice. Odds are excellent that the ground you think is flat is not, unless you have measured it with a precise ...


2

Get 3/4 rebar in the length you want, us a hammerdrill n drive the rebar in, secure ur fence to that. It will splut rocks as it drives down


2

Metal Fence post supports as seen here were helpful for me. I had to put a post for a railing into ground where a patio had been with a 5/8" gravel bed. The square head lets you put a four by four cut off in and get a really good whack at it with a sledge hammer. The only difficulty I found was that the post can twist as you are hammering it in. This ...


2

Have you considered using steel star posts instead? These are going to handle more of a whacking than a wooden stake so you should be able to drive it into the ground with more force.


2

Basic tools can be used at the cost of a lot of sweat. First tip is to water the area to be planted thoroughly the day before or even for a day or two. Wet soil is heavier but breaks up easier. Use a pick axe to dig a hole. You might be able to switch to a post hole digger once you have penetrated the crust If you have access to power tools that you can ...


2

You need the right tool for the job - unsurprisingly, called a "potato fork". One version is a fairly "general purpose" fork, but with wide flat tines so (large) potatoes can't slip between them. Alternatively, especially on light soils, you can use a wide fork with 9 or 10 tines - but on clay soils using one of those is hard work. If the potatoes have ...


1

I would consider this a "general" landscaping question. If your stream has water in it year round, then you will encounter water below. With a stream, you should be aware that you may also have flooding at certain times of the year. Of course I have no idea about the possible situation (bedrock, roots, or rocks etc.) that may be below where you plan to dig....


1

Your best friend is a 'post hole digger'...easy peasy, definitely will get you huffing and puffing a bit. It will be 8" wide and as deep as you are able. Should do fine working around stones as big as one's fist, if not, then a shovel is necessary. If you run into a tough horizon in the soil you should have at hand, nearby, an iron pry bar (5' by 1 1/4" ...


1

yes, changing the grade on an established tree is risky. If you do as you indicated you were thinking about and remove soil then let the roots sit on top of the soil this will stop them from absorbing water and exchanging nutrients with the mycorrhizal fungi in the soil. The roots will effectively stop working. I often find people writing that they ...


1

In short, no, a rotovator is not going to get rid of the ivy. If the ivy has been there some years and has thick stems above ground, it will have an extensive, fairly woody root system, and given that ivy will regrow from a single, thin stem and root left in the ground, clearing it altogether is a time consuming job. Tripclopyr is not available for amateur ...


1

I am all in favor of removing misplaced prickly pears. I'm in the middle of removing a huge one from my front yard. If you really want a prickly pear, save a few of the newest pads and plant those. After you chop it down let dry out some before putting it in the trash, it will weigh less.


1

OK I think I have an answer and a reason to pass on. Recall that the issue is that some spuds are so dirty they look like clumps of dirt and pass unseen under regular digging. Some time ago I picked up a curious tool that the French call a "griffe". The one in this image is a beauty with long tines. Mine has shorter tines, but helps. I don't see this tool ...


1

Since potatoes are formed from stolons which are stem adaptations, then if you don't want to miss any, plant your seed potatoes at ground level, and then cover with soil or whatever. Then you only need to get back to the ground level to make sure that you've got all your spuds since none will be below ground.


1

Colin I am glad to hear you are considering rotation problems. After this year, I have to plant potatoes in pots with potting soil. I do this with tomatoes, all the solanaceae just to preserve garden bed real estate. It gets tough! Brassicas as well. I use a pitch fork at the end of the season because it is huge in between tines, less likely to stab ...


1

For a well established tree you can use the distance from the drip line. This is the point at which the tree's branches and leaves extend to. However this area is likely to only include half the tree's roots. As this publication advises: Roots normally grow outward to about three times the branch spread. Only 50 percent of the trees root system occurs ...


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