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I think it's mildew! My citronella gets the same, especially when I stopped pruning it for a bit.


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As you suspected,the black parts on the fruits are blossom end rot - this is usually a result of erratic watering rather than simple underwatering. Once the fruits are forming, they need calcium - this is transported from the soil through the plant's vascular system and into the fruits. It is quite rare for the soil to be deficient in calcium, but if the ...


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Your rubber tree has signs of root rot. The soil is too damp for too long, which is either caused by too frequent watering (overwatering) or poor drainage in the soil (or the combination of both). To get back to a healthy situation I suggest you stop watering for a while, until you are sure the soil is completely dry. If you say you water it every 2 weeks, ...


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When moving it to another place with lower light intensity, it will probably need less water. So try to reduce watering accordingly. Try to feel the upper part of the soil with your finger before watering, it should feel dry. The plant overall looks healthy in my opinion, the yellowing and browning of the leaves are a first sign of slightly overwatering.


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Brown tips could be either over or under watering. Pines tend to have sprawling root systems. To keep it happy in a pot you need to keep it moist, but not wet. If wet, roots drown. With fewer roots, the top doesn't get enough water. So the signs of too much vs not enough water can be similar. The pine should be in a potting mix that is well drained. Do ...


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I think what you're looking for is a parthenocarpic variety. A parthenocarpic plant is one that does not need any pollination to set fruit and is perfect for greenhouse cultivation. I'm guessing that you've been planting either gynoecious (has only female flowers but requires a variety with male flowers for pollination) or standard varieties. There is a nice ...


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It's best to get a bag of topsoil and fill in the area with that, tamp it down and level off, ensuring it is flush everywhere it abuts the existing turf, and sow seed. The drawback is you can't walk on that area other than very lightly occasionally for 6 weeks; it's three months for normal use (frequently walking on it or running around on or laying on it) ...


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