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I have had a similar experience with okra and my issue was that the plants were to close together. After thinning them out leaving about a 10 inch spacing between plants, they started producing.


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You might want to examine it closely with a magnifying glass to check for any infestation of insects or mites, but otherwise, the problems it has are probably cultural/environmental, partially from being mistreated in the ways you describe. It's possible the brown edges are due to sitting behind a window with that many hours of sunlight - through glass, that ...


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This is a fungus/virus/bacteria that has taken advantage of wet conditions in the root ball to move upstairs, so to speak. Typical signs are starts with old growth typical end state is a circle of dead tissue surrounded by an area of dying yellow tissue sometimes you will see growth "rings" as the fungus/virus/bacteria grows out from the initial ...


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The issues with your tomatoes look like a fungus. In our area (I'm in very south-central Wisconsin), septoria is the most common fungal disease of tomato (we're actually lucky, as early and late blights are far worse diseases). I've had this issue for many years and only just last year figured out another possible vector for spread of the disease from year ...


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Any spots like that and I assume it is a fungal infection. Tomatoes are such fickle plants. I had issues with Septoria Leaf Spot for years in a raised bed. The spores over winter in the soil and get splashed up onto the lower leaves when it rains. The jump up from lower leaves to higher leaves every rain. I have also never seen it jump to my pepper plants ...


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This is scale. I looked up a great reference here on scale only to find that there are more types, colours and shapes than I could possibly imagine. I think your plant has soft brown scale. Scale on citrus is one of the most likely pests. This is an advanced infestation but you can verify my diagnosis by confirming that the rim of the pot and around it is ...


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It's hard to see for sure (more light on the peppers, and pictures of more fruits, may help), but I'm thinking it's just some pigment like anthocyanins developing on the skin in response to the UV, plant stress or something. They should be harmless. This is common on Jalapenos and Banana peppers, but it happens on at least some other kinds, once in a while. ...


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After some effort to bait and/or trap any snails/slugs went without much effect (or snails/slugs in trap) and noticing a relevant post on a local gardening site that indicated a cutter bee population in the area, I am generally convinced this is the issue I am having: https://neilsperry.com/2021/07/question-of-the-week-number-1-july-8-2021/ I will have to ...


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I’m a bit late to the game, but I found your post when researching the same issue with my avocado tree. I spoke to an arborist and he said these are not mites but rather leaf burn - your tree is not getting enough water and as a result the light is able to burn the leaves. Deep water once a week and it should prevent future burn - cut off the burnt leaves to ...


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