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1

It just looks like a little corking, where the plant hardens part of the stem for a variety of reasons. I think yours is due to the soil being too moist/rich. It's holding moisture next to the stem for too long. I recommend repotting it in cactus/succulent soil. And dont let it sit with wet feet in that outer pot.


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Shortly after I asked the question, the state of the plant quickly deteriorated. I cut a couple of the obviously dead leaves and then tried to keep the plant moist and somewhat in light. I did notice that the soil started to smell moldy so did some inspection of the roots - well the patient is dead. So from what I learned in the meantime: Freezing a plant ...


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I think it is armored scale with gall (the white stuff). The bugs are so small and flat that you don't recognize any insect parts, the white stuff is gall resulting from the infestation. You can use a magnifying glass to see if you can recognize bugs. Simple method to get rid of it is to brush them off with a toothbrush, like described here, the second ...


1

There is a natural flow of nutrients in solution from the root hairs up to the top of all plants where growth is happening. One result of this process is that as the sap reaches the top and the nutrients are used up what ends up on the leaf surface evaporates. Only the water can leave, so this process can leave behind salts and other minerals on the surface ...


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Do you still have this plant?? I have a Ctenanthe and it had similar symptoms to yours. The soil got pretty dry a couple weeks ago, I noticed the leaves start curling. At that point I watered it and the leaves uncurled however a few leaves were turning yellow at the bottom. So I watered it again about 5 days later and after that I noticed EVEN MORE leaves ...


1

I would not worry about the drooping. I have a few avocados from pits and one of them is constantly quite droopy like yours even after watering but otherwise quite happy. It's not because the leaves are heavy or the leaf petioles weak, it just evidently likes being like that. It could be related to the humidity in the house which is quite low right now since ...


2

Oaks begin as acorns which are a large store of nutrient to get the seedling going. At the end of the first year the chemistry needs to transfer from nutrition from the acorn which rapidly depletes to feeding from roots. In the transfer it can happen that the seedling will steal nutrients from older parts of the plant to send out the new leaves. The leaf ...


1

Your succulent looks quite normal for a mature plant. The leaves are plump, fat and healthy, showing some of the dusty bloom that they use to protect themselves from intense sunlight. The reddish tips are also normal for a high light plant, and the fact that a pup has appeared and some outside leaves are dying off indicates that its interior chemistry is ...


1

There is evidence of white fungal growth on one or two leaves, possibly mildew; you can spray with a fungicide or try baking soda mixed with horticultural oil, see this link White Mold in Succulents. In the meantime, try to improve air flow round the plant - check any other succulent plants you have indoors and separate it away from those if they are not ...


1

I would not put it in water; I suggest you get some new potting soil asap, a pot with drainage holes that is big enough to house what roots there are on the bottom of the one stem that appears to still have life in it without cramping or bending the roots, and pot it up properly, making sure the roots are all buried properly, and planting it no deeper than ...


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The stem on the left seems beyond saving. It has already withered away. The other stems still has a little bit of green, I think your best chance with that would be to put it into water. So wash of the roots, remove any dead part, put it into water and place it to a bright, warm spot. Make sure to change the water biweekly.


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Do you have a cat? It is curious that the marks on the dumb cane start out with small nicks at the top which become progressively larger as they go down; I mention a cat because cats think about gaining height and may be testing to see if they can climb on the plant or not. Note too that the stake has vertical slits - this might be just that the stake was ...


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We might try to think about these patches from the cell level. The leaf consists of an outer top layer of hard cells and a lower underside layer of equally hard cells and sandwiched between is a layer of much softer cells which do a lot of the chemistry processes, air exchange, purging of excess water and so on. When cells are damaged by high heat or other ...


1

One reason for this is a fungus infection called "damping off". This happens when the soil surface is too cool for rapid germination and also harbours a lot of fungal spores. The slow growth of the seedlings allows the fungal spores to penetrate the stem tissues and cut them off at soil level. To eliminate this possibility ensure that you do not ...


0

Plant need light to make energy, If it doesnt have energy it will not be able to support all this growth and will start shedding the leaves.


1

This plant has presumably been "forced" probably with the intention of making it flower for Christmas or Valentine's Day, though apparently that didn't quite work out as planned! In fact miniature roses are generally tougher plants than the larger varieties. The are quite happy with outdoor winter temperatures down to -20F (-30C). They prefer ...


1

Your olive tree looks very vigorous and healthy so it is in a good location. However the robust health might be one reason why it is not producing fruit. Trees are more useful when they are a bit stressed due to lack of water or nutrient since they are then more apt to produce flowers which then go on to produce fruit. The growth has apparently produced a ...


2

This appears to be Thrip damage. Thrips are very active fliers and can travel long distances on the wind, do their damage and move on. They make puncture marks on leaves which immediately are not very visible but later when the marks are numerous and result in dead discoloured cells the damage is suddenly apparent. Thrips are known to be a pest on Iochroma. ...


1

Is there any draining system in the pot? If not, then over watering might have done the harm. Whatever it is we will never know. Also I would like to ask the age of your plant. Tulsi can die anytime between 1.5 years to 3 years. At least in my place I have seen so, but obviously after flowering and producing seeds. Now, coming back to your question, are the ...


1

They seems quite healthy to me. Newly grown young leaves of mango trees are purple or brown. The petiole of the young leaves are not strong enough to bear the weight of the leaves hence they are drooped down. When they mature, they will become strong, deep green and they will become like other leaves beneath them. No need to worry about it. You will get ...


1

Moringa is a fairly plain tree with uncomplicated pinnate leaves so this is unlikely to be a reversion to type of complex leaves to simple leaves. More likely in a warm humid environment such as the tropics this could be an orchid which has become naturally implanted on the tree. See this youtube video for an example of how a Dendrobium orchid can be ...


1

When I was dealing with these plants on a regular basis they were called Dracaena demerensis cultivar Janet Craig. Botanists have been busy and this is now classified as Dracaena massangea. This plant is native to tropical Africa and will not stand below zero temperatures. The leaves are dead and should be removed. The stems and roots may be dead but it's ...


2

I suggest just leaving it alone. These plants bud out quite readily from old growth but usually need good light to power the new buds. If you wait till spring there will be more light. By spring you will also be able to evaluate how much of that stem has died back. When it buds out you can cut it back to just above the new buds.


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Citrus trees can drop all their leaves for various reasons, and quite often they will wait until the shock has passed and sprout new leaves. So the first thing to do is nothing - at least for a couple of weeks to see if anything happens. The wood that remains alive will resprout and this will tell you where the branches are still alive. At that time you can ...


0

In my experience avocados tend to grow in spurts; they have rest or quiet periods and then suddenly decide to make a rush for growth, sending up little new leaves at the growing point which suddenly overnight it seems expand into big leaves and then just sit there for a while before making a repeat performance. Avocados grow all over the Caribbean in full ...


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For what it is worth I too have avocados in Canada, with no supplemental lighting in a south facing window, use regular garden soil with a good proportion of sand mixed in and water by dunking the entire pot into several inches of plain water without waiting for the soil ball to dry out. I never fertilize but regularly move to a slightly larger pot with ...


8

Camelia Japonica, very happy in zone 8, there are hundreds of varieties ,colors white to pink to red, some with spotted coloring. The flowers look small, but correct color multiple petals for "Debutante". There is a very small chance it is a Camelia susanqua with very large flowers. Japonicas will bloom from the first of December until March in ...


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