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1

It may well have a problem with mildew and/or rust - on honeysuckle, it doesn't always show up as obvious powdery deposits. However, there are some environmental/cultural issues that will likely be affecting it. First, honeysuckles like partial shade; they don't like being very close to a fence and should be planted at least a foot away to improve air flow; ...


2

I think you should repot it into a larger pot with drainage holes (1, at most 2 sizes up) removing the mossy stuff at the top as you do it by pulling it all off, including some of the soil attached to it, without damaging the roots of the Jade plant. Use fresh potting soil to pack round the rootball and keep the soil level the same as it is now up the stems....


2

Mine was turning yellow until I stopped with tap water and started only giving it filtered or distilled water.


1

They will fruit around 2-5 yrs from seed if you are starting them from cuttings you more than likely will get fruit the first season as most horticulturists prune back/ top any branches that are over 3yrs old to promote fruiting and those are more than likely the cuttings you purchased.


0

Oh and as a after thought these plants are not really self fertile, you may just need another plant otherwise you will be stuck with a few chance berries. To get a bigger yield, I would recommend planting them 3 to 5 feat apart and as far as genetic diversity 5 to 8 plants, they should flower 5 to 7 times a year up to the first frost.


0

Use Neem tree oil, what i use is organic made by Garden safe its an anti fungal ,mite / bug replant. I use to have issues with mildew and aphids but not since using it on a regular basis, I would cease use a week or two before harvest as it can affect the berries taste.


3

They're suffering from drought; if you dug one up you'll likely find the rootball is dry. When you first plant a shrub (or any woody based plant) if it's not cool and damp ongoing, they need watering deeply once a week, more often if it's hot and dry. Leave the hose trickling at the base of each plant for at least an hour, moving it slightly to cover all ...


0

The yellow balls? Those are just little sacks of fertilizer. When you water the plant, the casing should break and release the fertilizer. Dig one out and run it under some water and squeeze and it'll pop. Sounds like you might just be having problems with light for your peace lily.


0

I asked about repotting because the pot it's currently in looks rather large for the size of plant. If it had white powder over the leaves a while back, that does sound like powdery mildew, but that can be caused by dryness at the root. It's hard to tell what's going on, between the white deposits and general sickly appearance, but inspect the stems ...


0

Dracenea massangeana, generally very tolerant , I have one descended from an original plant from over 50 years ago. I can only guess yours has too much or too little water. When too dry for a long period , the tips of the leaves will turn brown , so more likely too wet. Sometimes called "corn plant". Addition: Mine is outside for the summer months and we ...


0

It's possible that you have a female dioescious tree instead of a monoecious tree, and that a nearby pollinator died or was removed. Not all mulberries are monoecious.


1

There's nothing you can do apart from giving it some tlc; you can cut off dead leaves, otherwise, water only when it needs it, as you usually would. A small amount of houseplant fertiliser might help to encourage it, but otherwise, just wait and see if it starts putting out new growth when it's had time to recover. It certainly isn't completely dead yet.


-1

Did things go well with your Peace Lilly? I had a Peace Lilly that I was struggling to save for months after she flowered the first time ever. I regarded my work as intensive care unit at that time as leaf after leaf died. Some went brown at the ends, some went black, whilst others seem to continue on for some time. After the flowing I kept some seeds, but ...


1

These are probably mealybugs. Mealybugs don't move about much, just suck the sap, weaken the plant, and leave a sticky mess. Your population looks quite high so time to treat is very soon. Alcohol will get them. I think I would start with a small piece of cloth dipped in isopropyl alcohol wrapped around the leaf, start at the base of the leaf and pull ...


0

I use bleach every year ,diluted 1:3 water, I avoid spraying plants but some over-spray must hit them and I have never seen plant damage. Although none of my hollies are near the house.


2

Well I would say neither bacterial nor fungal. Reason being that the leaf of Pachypodium is typically tropical in that it is thick with a waxy/shiny/hard coat surface. It's really quite difficult for an infection to get from the outside in. Much more likely for problems to arise on the inside and display signs through the most visible parts later. Recall ...


0

This is not so much an answer as a bit of guidance to start with and some things for you to think about/answer. The first thing to do is cut down all the overgrown grass and weeds, then you can see what you're dealing with, and it would be useful to see more pictures once you've done that. It does look as though any grass has a high percentage of weed; if ...


1

You are right; generally the root can change colour to brown on many plants grown from pits, but the tip of the root is most often white. As to why this may happen, perhaps the paper towel contains or was prepared using some chemical process that left a residual chemical that the root is sensitive to. An immediate action might be to move the seed to a pot ...


0

Okay, so you repotted into proper potting soil but added compost to it? If the compost was not produced using a hot aerobic system, it may have introduced pathogens into the soil mix - potting soil is sterilised to prevent this possibility. If you're unsure as to the production method of the compost, it might be best to decant the plant, remove as much soil ...


0

I see two issues. A. a northern facing window is not going to provide sufficient light for healthy growth. B. your plant is very dehydrated. It's not in active growth and should be at this time of year (assuming northern hemisphere). When the top inch of soil is dry water until the water runs out the drains in the pot. As far as what caused the pad to turn ...


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