20

Those are male flowers, so what you're experiencing (no fruit) is absolutely normal. Female flowers have a mini fruit underneath, and usually appear when the plant is a little older. Look for a miniature fruit under the flower. The shape will depend on your variety. It looks like you may already have 1 or 2. It is normal for a young squash plant of any kind (...


19

Preface: This answer is based solely on the search result. I'm not a gardener and I don't have any gardening knowledge to sufficiently answer this with full certainty. Looking at the picture, it seems the most prevalent thing is the blackening of the core. Researching that gave results to a similar symptom from Alternaria/Black rot. This is caused by ...


13

You've got a bad infestation of fig wax scale. The ants are there for the honeydew, and are ant-farming. You want to get rid of the scale, they're basically living off of your plant, using up resources. If it's a small plant, you can use a pen or other pointy thing and pop as many off as you can, onto a small drop-cloth, to be destroyed. The rest can be ...


13

Looks pretty healthy to me. A lot of plants in the mint family get purple stems as they mature. It's not unusual to have a mix of dying, seeding, and new growth intermingled in common mint. Even when the whole of the plant seems to have died back, you can still have new runners appear from underground later. Common mint thrives along riverbanks or under ...


12

It looks in your photos as if you have it in a small cup with no drainage. I would surmise from that & the condition of the leaves that it is over-watered and probably suffering from root rot. Replant it into a container with drainage holes with a rich, well draining potting soil. Keep the soil damp but not soggy and give it some time.


12

Definitely looks like something from a sci fi/horror movie! Black areas within oranges are usually caused by a fungal pathogen - it enters most often at the 'navel' end of the orange and then spreads inside the fruit in varying degrees. It most often spreads up the central area, but can appear as small black areas in some of the cells of the orange. However,...


11

First, your Acer is not dying, it's just very unhappy. This is a common problem on Acer palmatum varieties here in the UK- usually, the cause is wind, that is, you've placed the plant in a spot which isn't sheltered enough. They hate windy areas, and they don't like hot midday sun in high summer either. What they do like is dappled sunlight, or morning sun, ...


11

Looks like natural variegation to me...looks like a typical golden pothos (Epipremnum aureum). It's supposed to have these marks. They show up and contrast best with good lighting. Don't worry about this - it's natural, and healthy.


11

It is probably suffering in part from transplant shock. Give it some time to adjust. Also, make sure you are not over-watering. If you stick your finger an inch or so into the soil, it should feel cool & damp, but not soggy. Let the soil dry to this point, but not completely dry & then saturate when watering. Wait until the soil has dried to the ...


11

This is a gymnosporangium infection - its a form of rust that needs two separate plants in order to complete its life cycle, one of which is Eastern Red Cedar. The other plant life form it needs is a member of the Rosaceae family, such as apple trees, crabapples, hawthorns and quince. It often doesn't cause particular damage to the Cedar - but when it ...


10

Edited to add: Ahhh! The pictures you added tell a lot. Your plants are further along than I assumed based on your original post. When the plants are as far along as yours are, flowers not opening can be a sign of stress. Sometimes it happens when you have a squash vine borer, but in your case, I think it is because the plants are much too close together. I ...


10

Moss on an indoor pot is a sign that the mix surface is constantly damp, and that isn't good. Use a fork or toothpick or something, and stir up the top layer to get rid of it. Always allow the top 1/2" or so to dry between waterings. Competition shouldn't be a problem except for very small seedlings, and the flavor should be fine.


10

Etiolation, or insufficient light strength, is a partial explanation - this tree is deciduous and normally would be dormant at this time of year. However, the process of thigmomorphogenesis is also missing. Thigmomorphogenesis refers to movement - when a plant is outside, particularly one with a tall, woody stem, it will be exposed to air movement. That air ...


10

Pollination is probably the issue - the cucumber is formed behind a female flower, but if the flower does not get pollinated, then it yellows, shrivels and drops off. You haven't said whether you're growing under glass (less likely to be pollinated by insects) or not, but you can hand pollinate - take a small paintbrush, grasp the male flower (the ones ...


9

From the question, it sounds like your mint plant is too dry. Mint plants in pots are very sensitive to the moisture content of the growing media. They prefer very moist, but not saturated soil while growing. Also, mint plants like lots of light. In low light conditions they will stretch and become weak, which would cause the falling over. Also, the lower ...


9

Of the eight pictures only the third picture shows a cedar that will look good. The rest are either dead or so badly damaged it would take years before they looked good. This kind of dieback is often seen when they are not adequately watered after planting or when stock is planted late in the fall and doesn't have a chance to root before winter. ...


9

Yep, that is a Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum Here's how to plant/grow a Japanese maple tree in a pot: Prep: The preparation necessary before attempting to plant. Make sure all of these steps are done/ready before you begin. Make sure you have a pot large enough to accommodate the plant for at least a year. They will need at least 6 cubic feet (38 US ...


9

That is magnesium deficiency. It can also cause yellowing between leaf veins. Treat by watering Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) at a rate of 1 cup per every two gallons, with every watering until the symptoms leave. See a comparison pic:


9

Check the stems. Are they just limp, or are they decaying at the base? And check the soil. Is it dry all the way through? What I suspect to be the case is: Cacti need water too, just not as much. If the mix is dry all the way through, that is too dry. If that's the case, give it a good watering right away. The limpness, if there are no signs of rot, is ...


9

I went to Tractor Supply, a farm store, I'm sure there are others, and bought a 50 Lb bag of oat seed (hull on) for about $14.00. Horses like it. I put a 3/4 cup of seeds in wet dirt in a 12" clay or plastic pot drip tray catcher with some holes drilled in it for drainage. Cover the holes w windowscreen to minimize dirt leakage. Dirt's about 1.5 inches deep. ...


9

Seems like your culprit is smallish. Candidates would be caterpillars Check for their droppings - greenish or blackish "pearls" - or the animals themselves hiding either under the leaves or along the stems. Simply pick them off, no chemicals needed. slugs or snails tend to leave slimy traces - search and remove like caterpillars. bugs rather unlikely, but a ...


9

Ficus maclellandii, Narrow-leaf Fig or Banana Leaf Ficus. One of the best indoor and patio Ficus for ornamental use, with several similar-looking cultivars, including 'Alii' and 'Amstel King'. In the wilds of Southeast Asia and Northern Australia, this tree can grow up to 50 feet or more. But the cultivars available in most nurseries are mere ...


9

You have this kind of wounds of your apple tree because it was not pruned correctly. It cannot heal at the tip of the cut, so you must cut close to where the other buds or living branches are. Opposite to other trees, you must cut very close to the buds. Here is how to prune: very close to the parts that will go on handling life in them. What not to do:


9

First, I missed off a bit of this particular one's proper name - it's Sansevieria trifasciata laurentii; the version without yellow stripes is just Sansevieria trifasciata. My houseplant book says to only re-pot when the pot it's in starts to bulge - then you can either pot into something larger or divide the plant in two and pot the sections separately. ...


8

Here's what we eventually did to save the plant, mostly following the answers: Removed the dead leaves and cut the dead parts off of other leaves. Pruned the roots, and cleaned the green goo. This is pretty easy by washing the roots under a faucet. Changed the pebble, because it was covered with green goo. We use potting soil instead of the pebble it came ...


8

Look on the bottom of the leaves. If you see small rows of tiny white capsules, you have leaf miners. These devastated spinach and chard for our garden. They also infest beet greens but are not a problem unless you eat the tops. Control is to remove infested plants, put screens over the plants to keep the flies from coming onto the plants, and eliminate ...


8

Goji berry vines are highly susceptible to Powdery Mildew. In fact, I wouldn't recommend trying to grow them in the Pacific Northwest as it's too damp here. In 10 years of trying, they leaf out lushly, and about a month later start mildewing. Nothing you do will get rid of the mildew as it's a systemic problem with the plant. I've only ever gotten about ...


8

I think you have Cucumber mosaic virus, because of the mosaicing, curling, and drying of the leaves, and the stop in production, plus the time frame of infection matches perfectly. There is no cure. What you can do is try to keep it from spreading, which is done by removing affected plants from the environment. Burn or seal them in bags to prevent the virus ...


8

You are overwatering. I can see a line on the pot, in the saucer, where the water level usually is. The soil also looks very wet. That is far too much water for a strawberry plant. The leaves are also showing signs of nitrogen burn. It may be too late, but you can give it another shot. You should immediately dump out that saucer, and repot the plant as ...


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