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7

As far as I can see, the benefit is the two trees pollinate each other. I think after they get to a certain size though the stems will become too woody/stiff to continue twisting them together so I am not sure of the long term benefit.


6

These 'twisted apple trees' are a fairly new concept, so how they perform over a decade or more will be interesting to see. Viv is right in that the benefit is you only need one twisted apple, because the varieties are selected so they pollinate one another, and that's an advantage where growing space is at a premium. Over time, they'll either fuse together ...


5

Is there a picture we can see? There is no conclusive way to answer this question without looking at them. If they are twisted quite well and on purpose, then that seems a bit odd. If they are twisted just slightly on purpose, that makes sense in a way. If they are just incidentally twisted, it probably will work out fine, given enough room for both trees ...


4

A friend implemented an excel spreadsheet grid map, where each cell would represent a geographical point of his allotment (easy for square plots), this enabled him to do some things via comparing cells and tables over years to measure his 'area' of plants and to cross compare different versions which represented different times. I would implement things ...


4

I have used Vegetable Garden Planner (http://gardenplanner.almanac.com/). It is a good tool that help not just keep track of what you planted each year but also with recommendations with respect to plant spacing, rotation, etc. and best of all it is not very expensive at all.


4

If you are looking for optimum results I recommend starting the plant indoors in seed starter mix or just regular potting soil. By doing this you ensure a better chance of success. Also, try to identify the flower after it blooms so that you can take better care of it in the future. These are all great beginner flowers so feel free to experiment as well with ...


3

Fantastic question. You need something with coarse texture, huge texture. Have you ever seen Gunnera? Dinosaur Food? I've never seen it this large, but close. Your flowers would be very happy with this guy as a 'body guard'? Lots of other ideas but this is the one that came to mind and would definitely slow people down at the corner!


3

Launching any artistic venture is a highly risky strategy if you are seeking income rather than internal reward. There are many people in the industry and the distribution follows the power law - a very tiny fraction will be very good and earn significant income, and a large segment will get little business and earn little to no income. Discouragement is ...


3

Do you have a relatively local college or university with a horticulture program? If yes, then you could contact the head of the program, explain what you'd like done, and most likely be able to get an advanced student to review your plan as a real-world experience (the student would probably do a pros/cons analysis for their instructor after you left). ...


3

So I did some research and I am finding some good information, but it sounds like it depends on what your growing. I found, for example tomatoes, it is best to trench plant them. Source Here. According to the page the advantage is the tomato will for more roots, allowing the plant to take more nutrients and water, so bigger plant. Another thing I found ...


3

I am sending pictures of screens that would be great for an espalier as well as break up your wall of fence. Also firepit pictures...also lawn edge curves, plant beds mounded...


3

Some additional considerations for you as you go through the exciting process of designing your garden. In winter, the sun's arc is lower in the sky and in summer the sun's arc is higher in the sky. Why is this important? I've attempted to illustrate with a diagram of your back garden... The types of trees and plants you select will have a significant ...


3

Your garden is West/south-west facing, if the sun disappears to the top right of your image. West facing gardens get no sun at all before lunchtime. I'm afraid I'm going to give you some planting and design advice that you may not welcome. Because I'm old and can only visualize plants in feet, I've converted the size of your garden to feet, and its roughly ...


3

I suspect that even with complete knowledge they'd still sell them. It would take years, maybe even decades for the trunks to do a lot of harm to each other, by which time the sellers reckon you'll have moved/got bored of the trees/pruned them sporadically enough that you blame yourself... They appear to be a subset of the "family"apple tree; according to ...


2

The 'problem' with this 'braiding' or intertwining of trunks is that it could cause problems with the vascular system but I've never seen that happen. They 'grow together' and share vascular systems. Outside or where there is a lot of wind and when branches rub they aren't able to 'grow together' and the rubbing leaves room for disease to easily infect the ...


2

Your photos show a good example of what's known as cordon training - this is a method used mostly for fruiting trees, and it looks as if the trees in the photo may actually be apple, but its hard to be sure. Cordon training requires a basic framework to be in place, and the trees you choose will need regular pruning and tying in, so they must be able to ...


2

A 'grove' is composed of understory trees, most coveted are multistemmed species. Your are considering dense shrubs? Would love to help with this as 'groves of trees' are one of my 'things'...a grove of trees makes a space; that space will have a roof and walls and a floor. My favorite 'grove' tree is Amelanchier alnifolia multi trunked. One needs a ...


2

Well black thumb...now I get it. I did this in a development and had a forest, seriously, that gave fruit, shade, interest and privacy. We had to leave and they ripped ALL OF MY PLANTS and hard scape OUT. Put back in lawn. I am still grieving big time. There are things you need to consider. For example; the cactus in this guy's yard along with deciduous ...


2

You are saying you like the first picture and the second is the actual picture at your home? Minime You are feeling and seeing the problem. The need to unify. We were taught that humans are only comfortable seeing 3 things. That is how composition is taught with any art, paintings or landscape the principles are the same. There are a number of ...


2

I am the creator of Raddish (https://raddish.app/), which is a free tool to plan your garden and track plantings. I'm currently working on building a robust layout designer, but the current website should give you a sense of what's in the ground throughout the season! Many users also use the "notes" feature to describe where each planting is ...


2

The two common mushrooms that can grown outside, or in greenhouses, are Pleurotus ostreatus and Agaricus bisporus. The former is a primary decomposer that would be grown on straw, and the latter is a secondary decomposer that traditionally is grown in composted horse manure. When grown in greenhouses, Agaricus bisporus is often grown in winter and the heat ...


2

It sounds like you want a professional to have a look at your plan and just correct/critique it, rather than asking the professional to come up with a design they think will suit you. Whilst it should be possible to get someone to simply critique what you've done already, were it me, I'd need to visit, inspect the area, and measure up accurately, then look ...


2

A friend of mine was moderately successful at it. She was in a symbiotic situation with a very large garden shop. She was independent but the shop provided her office space. I think she had a degree in botany. When shoppers had questions about plant uses and landscaping they were were referred to her ; Most of the shop people were basically clerks . She ...


2

I am not completely sure what you mean by using three racks, but I'm picturing something like your innovative door-turned shelf at your three specified heights all on your deck. If my mind's picture is what you are suggesting, I do not think there is much danger in setting up a vertical garden in this way, but I think you will be constrained by space and ...


1

This link for miniature agaves (really intended to be grown in pots) might be helpful - you'll need to decide which will grow where you are, depending on your local climate and average winter temperatures, since you've not given that information https://www.houzz.com/magazine/10-small-scale-agaves-just-right-for-containers-stsetivw-vs~69485767


1

I've trained a vine (cultivar - Phoenix) up a pergola in my garden, so I can tell you what works for me. There's a permanent "T" shaped framework consisting of a single main stem going up one vertical face of the pergola, which divides into two horizontal arms perpendicular to the roof batons and tied in at the top. The roof batons are 450mm apart. Each year ...


1

For the last question: the usual method is one year parallel, and one year perpendicular (because it is the direction it will take naturally: new branches perpendicular to previous branches). About the distances: they are vines, they can reach few meters distance without problem (but with risk some go down, and so you need to move them up). For real ...


1

The King Strophoria (Stropharia rugosa-annulata) (aka Wine Cap) is ideally suited for this. I'm not exactly sure why you would want manure under chips for the path - it seems like this would dramatically speed up the decomposition of the chips and increase the need to replenish. That said, you could easily intercrop with Wine Caps in the wood chip paths ...


1

Since mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of hidden mycelial networks then they don't suit the square foot gardening paradigm which allocates a square foot for different plants as mushrooms need to be grown as a monoculture if you want a decent crop. The larger the network the more resilient the mushrooms are as they act as a single organism. So you don't want ...


1

Approximate guesses: Thuja occidentalis 'Umbraculifera' Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Filifera Aurea' or Juniperus horizontalis 'Lime Glow' Thuja occidentalis 'Globosa' Picea pungens 'Fat Albert' Anyway, you don't need the exact species like in the photo, but similar. Keep in mind that yellow and blueish conifers may significantly change its color in winter. ...


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