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8

If you are going for a low-maintenance garden that will not require humans to be there to care for them, I think your best bet is to go with a native plant garden. It will need care while you are establishing it, but once the plants have developed a strong root system, they will require almost no care. Have you seen the Project Noah? There is a page on ...


8

First off, if its grown from seed you may want to consider grafting while its still a manageable size. If it frosts in your area this may be a consideration in getting a suitable graft, in the comments it mentions some mexican varieties that may be more frost resistant. You can always graft individual branches later. Fruit from ungrafted plants (from seed)...


7

As long as you are willing to water there are many options. Fruit trees that will work: low chill, early ripening apples, peaches, plums, figs, pomegranates, nectarines and apricots and virtually all varieties of citrus trees. Grapes can also be grown, as well as melons and strawberries. I have seen various bare root berries available (my two attempts at ...


7

Based on a Google image search it seems to be glossonema edule, and is found in and around Qatar.


6

We may have a similar climate at least in summer, I am in a mediterranean climate. Heat started early with two weeks of 40+C (104F) followed by high 30s. No rain until autumn if we are luckly. I restrict the vegi patch to a very small area in summer which I can water. A few tomatoe plants which are started early so they are large and fruiting before the ...


6

You need to dig it into the soil, by rototilling if that's your choice. If you don't, you'll have a nutrient, humus rich layer on top of solid clay, which will act as a pan and create a drainage problem. If you weren't planting in spring, or were able to add the compost to the soil surface last autumn, you could have left it spread out and it would have been ...


6

I would recommend embracing the clay, especially if it gets super hot and arid there. I would be more concerned about the pH. Nevertheless, organic matter is important, but changing your clay into something else is a lot of work and expense (and can take years, which you might not have if you're moving). Here's what I recommend: Mix peat moss into your ...


5

For perennials, dates and figs might work, as well as all sorts of cacti (you could do a whole garden with them, since there are loads of kinds). Both the pads and the fruit are edible of most Prickly Pear cactus varieties. Also, Rosborough and Womack Blackberries. Similar to Debbie M.'s answer, most things in the Prunus genus may work well: almonds, ...


5

It is a succulent and won't take much foot traffic at all, compared with grass. If you plan to walk through your yard often, I wouldn't recommend you do this. Also, it will shade and cool the soil, and so will encourage the germination and establishment of weeds where they otherwise would be getting baked. Other than that, it could look good while green. I'...


5

In the Riverland of South Australia we experience 40°C through the summer down to -5°C in winter. My experience is that many common edibles can be grown given the right position within the available environment. I extend my Brassica season by erecting temporary shade structures towards summer, using existing shaded areas for cooler-climate varieties, ...


5

My suggestion would be to examine the efforts of a similarly hot country such as Israel. There have been some efforts to grow strawberries in the hot season there. The Israelis have a long tradition in horticulture and may have a lot of research available to you which would give you a good idea whether your project is feasible. Here in Canada where ...


4

There are many sources of desert-adapted heirloom seeds. Native Seeds/SEARCH just happens to be the one I'm familiar with in southern Arizona. My goal is for everything in my dirt patch in Tucson to be edible! You can grow peppers, of course. Tomato varieties with small leaves. Squash, beans, and corn. The Tohono O'odham have a bean called the tepary ...


4

Well, I'd still highly recommend composting. You don't have to improve the soil all at once, but most common edibles just have not evolved to grow in poor soil - they've been bred over generations and generations to be pampered a bit. I'm not sure what your motivation is for choosing fertilizer over compost, but you'll actually be kinder on your native soil ...


4

Dragonfruit (pitya) is a cactus that bears large edible fruit. Other things to consider would be Pomegranates, pistachios, maybe even date palms... Probably lots of normal stuff "can" survive there with a little help, I would talk to someone at a nursery in or near you area (maybe Phoenix or Scottsdale)


4

Why not do what people in similar climates used to do for centuries? Use large flat rocks to conserve soil moisture. You can amend their methods to work with drip irrigation too if you wish. Use of natural materials, especially stone, is a feature of permaculture in dry environs. This method is still practiced today. It's just not that common since most ...


3

Sounds as if you've the making of a true gardener! Please check out your city's water treatment, sewer treatment facilities. Ask if they decompose human shit with added sawdust via federal guidelines. THIS IS THE BEST BEST BEST mulch to use on your very sandy yet clayey soils! Don't have to manually mix DECOMPOSED ORGANIC MATTER into your soil just put ...


3

Do you live in Australia? Without seeing the leaves (small), the flowers, there are some pods in the picture when we enlarge my guess is Acacia kempeana...Wanderrie Wattle.


3

Maybe a wild guess: To me it looks like a Tumbleweed of the Salsola spcies. It was my first impression considerinfy you mentioned Arizona desert. Googeling it shows a couple of pictures.


3

You mentioned that one of the attractions of Purslane is that it's a weed. I've been experimenting with Kikuyu grass in Phoenix AZ with moderate success so far. I'm hopeful that it will take over my Bermuda Grass lawn which it is competing with and so far it's showing signs that it will. It is classified as a noxious weed in all parts of the US except ...


3

I managed to grow cherry tomatoes here in CA. I don't know how I did it but I just dug a foot down and then I used top soil and watered it every day and they came out fine. I did not use any pesticides either.


3

These pictures are all oleander. I hear it is quite poisonous (to eat). Don't know where it is native to, but it is super-hardy, and Calif. dept. of transportation loves to plant it along the freeways. I'm sure its drought tolerance is part of the reason.


3

This is distinctive enough for me to offer: American Red Bush Lantana. (Image courtesy Monrovia) Lantana come in many colours and it is quite normal to have two or more on the same flower head.


3

I grew up in one of the hottest driest places in Australia. My mother still lives in this place... Adelaide, South Australia and she lives in a house on a quarter acre, surrounded by a large garden with no lawn. Most of her garden is watered by drip irrigation. Two elements are essential for success. Adequate water to sustain plants during periods of dry ...


3

Watering plants everyday is not good ONLY when the plant does not need the water. My tomatoes are always in pots in our climate so that I can move them in and out when the weather changes, mostly every dang night. Being in pots in potting soil always, they dry out quicker but I still never water every day. When they are starts in small pots, yes they are ...


2

Sweet potatoes are easy and love the July heat. Both the potatoes and the leaf is edible. Chard is good early, as well as beets and potatoes from my experience. I try many vegetables; some work out better than others. Experiment!


2

If scarcity of water is an issue then maybe look into something like hugelkultur: the ultimate raised garden beds. I usually dig a pit and fill with logs then backfill to make my raised beds. The wood helps retain water and over the years, as it rots down it provides nutrients to your veggies. I water maybe 2 or 3 times over the period of a growing season ...


2

The problem with purslane where I live is that it doesn't germinate until June or July... So it isn't dominant enough to out compete other weeds.


2

First, I'll mention that if there was a tree there before, it was taken down for a reason. If the reason was disease, you'll want to know the species, so that you don't accidentally replant the same thing. Of course, id-ing stumps is hard, especially once the bark is off. You may have to ask around, or just chance it. Now, here are some trees you may find ...


2

It grew up to be a kind of Foxtail. This stuff grows really well and produces a nice green grass--but eventually becomes an annoying Foxtail, spreads its seeds, and then immediately dies.


2

I grew the Gray oak in question from seed at my production nursery in Los Lunas and I've grown over 100,000 native oak trees of the Southwest over the years. I also have Gray Oak - Quercus grisea in my private arboretum in Los Lunas called the Arboretum Tome. The soils of the arboretum were originally a Saline, Sodic Alkaline Clay with a pH as high as 9.2. ...


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