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9

Of the eight pictures only the third picture shows a cedar that will look good. The rest are either dead or so badly damaged it would take years before they looked good. This kind of dieback is often seen when they are not adequately watered after planting or when stock is planted late in the fall and doesn't have a chance to root before winter. ...


7

Your trees are in very bad shape. Most of them will take quite a while to recover, if they do. At this point it would be suggested that you replace them. It's always best to plant these in the spring, before new growth begins, and the sun is less intense. The cooler temperatures and shorter days will relieve some of the stress. Make sure the plants stay well ...


7

The yew bushes in front of the building I work at are flattened by snow and ice every winter, (nobody cleans it off, and if the roof gets cleared, they get extra helpings on top.) They are poorly shaped for snow (trimmed dead flat on top). When the snow melts they are fine (and have been for 20+ years of this.) Therefore, my suggestion is: do nothing, ...


7

It's certainly possible to spread some fungal infections on gardening gloves and tools you may have used. Given you're wearing rubber gloves, after handling diseased plant material, its sensible to go indoors and wash your gloved hands, in a similar manner to that you would use if you weren't wearing gloves, in between healthy and non healthy plants; the ...


6

I'm sorry I don't know the cause of your damage, but I have a lot of experience with sedums, and can reassure you that a healthy plant can grow even if the top is damaged, dead, or broken off; and even if the roots have come out of the soil and completely dried up. I live in Massachusetts, growing zone 6, (-10°F, -23°C) and have a number of varieties of ...


6

Not to worry. The tree has or soon will compartmentalize the damage (CODIT). Over time new wood and bark will grow in from the sides and it may eventually close completely. Of course, the more foliage there is above the wound, the faster this process will proceed. When bark is damaged exposing the xylem (wood) there are some cambium cells or xylem initials ...


6

By the time a tree is 40 years old they have adjusted to the neighborhood and do not like changes in the level of the soil or amount of roots. These suggestions work for most trees: do not raise the level of the soil more than a half an inch (1 cm) per application. Do top dress up to twice a year with compost or other organic matter. after the damage to ...


6

If this plant still has a good root system and is not dying due to being water logged or root rot then the tough love approach works: cut everything back to the ground when new growth starts fertilize lightly once this year in the spring there are numerous choices for fertilizer: compost tea for those who prefer the organic do it yourself approach seaweed ...


6

Ah, so that's what you mean by Money Plant - this one's more commonly known as Devils Ivy or Pothos, but is, as you now say, Epipremnum aureum. It is on the list of plants toxic to rats, so again, I'd be very surprised if the damage has actually been caused by rats. That said, cut back the plant to remove badly damaged or unattractive areas - the odd hole in ...


5

Although it won't hurt the yew for the branches to lay down thusly, indeed this is how many confers grow naturally anyway is to spread out after grow up first. They may not lift back up. The hole will fill after a few years but you may not want to wait. After the thaw, wrap the yews with twine and lift the branches back to where you want them and let the ...


5

Diagnosis from a picture is hard but I can make these observations: tree looks healthy with a reasonable branch structure no signs of previous trunk damage good practices have been followed by not letting grass grow up to the trunk it is mulched with a thin layer of pine needles, another good practice it is not staked which is another good practice and ...


5

Cold is a possibility, but I don't think that's what's caused this damage; given where you are, unless you've had freak weather conditions in your particular location, it seems the temperatures recently have not fallen below 20 deg C during the day. What has caused it is direct sunlight. These plants do not like direct sunlight even indoors - outside it ...


5

You need to investigate a little more as some important information is missing: what kind of soil is underneath? Was fresh topsoil added and raked out before the sod was added? was the sod rolled over to promote greater contact with the ground? turn up some dead areas and dig down a bit. Do you see white grubs? Does the grass have any roots into the soil?...


5

The leaf with the line of holes in it shows signs of mechanical damage as Escoce suggests. The other damage is strongly suggestive of fungus/virus/bacteria brought on by over watering. Identification is suggested by: sunken lesions irregular areas of dead tissue surrounded by dying tissue surrounded by a thin line no signs of insect eggs/frass/adults ...


5

Succulents do not 'heal' in the traditional sense from cracks or tears. Leave it be, unless it is starting to rot, and hopefully the plant will continue to grow and a new leaf will come up. You could trim the damaged leaf at the stem, but this is not necessary and will just turn brown.


5

I would just leave it. This happens in the wild and plants are fine. It looks like a fairly new/small plant so pruning that much leaf structure might do more harm than good. If it's lacking support or if the leaf is pulling apart because of it's own weight then you could prop it up or tie a string around the plant to keep the leaves from falling.


5

The symptoms shown in your photograph indicate bleeding canker - what I'm not sure of is whether Sudden Oak Death is an issue in your area, so far as I can tell, its a major problem in California but not where you are (yet). Sudden Oak Death is caused by infection with Phytophthera ramorum, but I'd expect some symptoms on the foliage too with that particular ...


5

These things happen (in my case, my cats get excited and "boticidal"). They just might survive. I would leave any leaves that are still on the plants there, protect them from any further damage, water them just to give them one less thing to worry about, and wait. If they already are in partial shade, that is great. If possible, you could give them some ...


5

Good news! Totally normal and healthy! No worries!!


5

As time goes by, the web is turning out to be as big a source of misinformation as actual word of mouth - no, its not true as far as I'm aware. In fact, I have, in the past, clipped off the tips on mine if they've developed what looks like a spike on the tip of the leaves. Although the 'spike' or point looks like a thorn, it isn't, its quite soft, but might ...


4

From the image, I can tell you, it is still doing okay. Secondly, I think you are doing everything you are supposed to, for now. Just like us, plants also need time to heal. I'd recommend some compost or moss on the top to let more of the stem not be showing it is the way now. This is just something I do, and has worked to keep plants warm, retain ...


4

I am going to take a stab at this one. I don't think this is pest induced, but rather the longer term effects of mechanical damage. A leaf getting folded, brushed up against too many times, or the slightest of breezes making the leave rub against something else. Being the end of winter, there hasn't been much new growth and this tropical plant has just been ...


4

That is cold damage. It was too cold outside for your plant, and the cold damaged the cells (by expansion > rupture). That looks like a peace lily. Here's a good article on cold damage in peace lilies. From that article: a study by members of the University of Florida's Environmental Horticulture department showed that peace lily can be damaged by ...


4

Ouch! What an investment you've made. I am sorry. All but the totally green ones will not make it. What kind of soil is in your terraced beds? What is your irrigation schedule? What did you use for fertilizer, soil ammendments? What is the orientation of these beds. Did you buy these in pots or b&b? Let us help you to not make this mistake again. ...


4

These yews are going to be fine. Cut any broken branches back to a healthy main stem. Lop off ends to relieve weight. Not a great idea to use twine at this stage as that would act like a cast on one's arm, atrophying and weakening the branch. When pruning for a hedge, I am assuming this is what you are trying to accomplish, keep the top narrower than the ...


4

No, those leaves will all drop off. That is the beauty of being a deciduous tree! Leaves are the most vulnerable, roots a step up but buried in the ground (not a pot) protects them and then the stem/branches that have a thick epidermis and dormancy that slows the vascular system down to a crawl. Dormancy means the plant is done making its own food for the ...


4

Do you have a photo? It always helps us to look at photos. I will answer generically for now. Aloes are sturdy, hardy plants. You have it in water, but don't leave it there for too long. Get good draining soil and plant it, mulch, and set the plant against bright, indirect light till the plant heals. Do not feed the plant. Let it get roots and start ...


3

Snip the unrecovered, bent stems out as close to the base of the plant, just above the soil level, as you can get without damaging any of the other stems. Keep it fed and watered and it should produce new growth without any problem. And maybe get someone else to look after your plant when you're next away from home!


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