8

You must not use Scotts Weed and Feed formulation now for two reasons - one, you've already applied a weedkiller to the entire lawn, and one of the active ingredients, 2,4D, is present in both formulations, which means you'll be overdosing on the weedkiller front. Second, where you live, your first frost date is early October, so feed should not be applied ...


8

Vines are not a special group of plants, but - like trees and shrubs - defined by appearances. Vines have long stalks/shots/branches that are too weak to support themselves. Usually vines are divided in two subgroups, creepers and climbers: Creepers are vines that - if left alone - trail over the ground or hang down. If gardeners want them to grow upwards, ...


7

Lamium varieties would probably fit the bill - they come in various leaf colours, some striped, some spotted, some yellow or variegated, some almost white, and all flower, mostly lilac flowers but also yellow or white. The following are ones worth investigating: Lamium maculatum 'Anne Greenaway', L. 'White Nancy', L. Beacon Silver, L. maculatum 'Brocade', ...


6

Don't kill it, just learn to live with it and look how beautiful it is. If ever it takes too much space, reduce it mechanically by hand. Remember that plants are very strong and that products which are able to kill them hurt you also... You will save money, and learn more interesting things by tolerating wild flora in your garden! In fact you are lucky that ...


6

Vinca is a great ground cover vine that flowers, and creeps. Makes for a nice "ivy" type of look... Ground cover images More info on the plant here.


6

Here is another option: Chrysogonum virginianum from an earlier post titled What is this native North American ground cover?


5

With the caveat that you need to check how much weight that structure will bear, Trachelospermum jasminoides (confederate jasmine) should cover the area very well. It's an evergreen vine with fragrant white flowers during summer; but, it is a twining climber, and it will need something to twine around to get up to the roof, such as trellis or wires. Once ...


5

That is Vinca major 'Variegata', or variegated greater periwinkle. And it is an invasive. Here's a picture to compare leaves.:


4

This is a great ground cover. It is hardy to seasonal drought, has beautiful leaves, pretty flowers in spring, is evergreen, and controlled very easily with pulling or cutting, spring or fall. I used it in a 5 x 5 space under a bamboo clump in an Atlanta side flower garden with low-growing flowers with no problem in three years. "Invasive" is a term used ...


4

Another possibility is Cymbalaria muralis, aka Ivy-Leaved Toadflax, Kenilworth Ivy, Climbing Sailor, Colisseum Ivy or Devil's Ribbon. Note that this plant can be considered invasive in some areas of the US. Dave's Garden has some good information, including assesments, positive, negative and neutral, from people who have experience with this plant. I've ...


4

This is Campsis radicans or Trumpet creeper. Most definitely your problem. Causes lots of rashes and itching! Very very aggressive plant, great if need to cover fences, wonderful flowers but you have to be aggressive back to restrain this plant.


3

The technique you need is layering. It is frequently used with field pumpkin and squash vines which root easily into mounds of soil over the nodes. The natural habit of squash is horizontal, but Viriginia Creeper and other vines like Clematis have a vertical habit and may need pegging. If the creeper is at all woody you might need to injure the tissues at ...


3

some shade suggestions: Vinca minor, Hostas, Coral Bells, Hardy Aroids ( eg. Arum italicum), Fuchsia... some that might cascade a little more: Virginia creeper, boston ivy, english ivy, vinca ...


3

The answer might be that the sunlight is weaker, as you put it. Although Passiflora likes sun, even in the UK the advice is to protect or shade from very hot sun from late spring to early summer, which implies this plant grows better when the sun is less strong. Certainly, sunlight in the UK during April, May and early June is stronger in terms of UV than ...


2

They look to me like a member of the Cissus Genus, Vitacea (Grape) Family, probably something along the lines of Cissus trifoliata. This and this flickr images look very similar to me. The Dave's Garden page here also has more info and pictures that look about right. FWIW, ivies have more of a point on the tip of their foils but yours look to almost be ...


2

A nearby car dealership has this as a ground cover in several areas. The lawn maintenance tech says it is jasmine. Lucky me! Maybe it will flower if we stop mowing it. Or, as my research shows, it could be a non-flowering faux jasmine, which still makes an awesome ground cover.


2

maintenance of Virginia Creeper You most certainly can use this as ground cover but you need to know this plant is orientated to grow vertically, not horizontally. You will have to always be pruning and confining its growth to direct it to stay where you want it to go. Otherwise, this plant will find the first vertical prop; a tree, building, fence and ...


1

Well, you could consider using some form of bindweed. It is a common hardy "weed" that usually grows white or blue flowers. It can be a great ground cover and requires very minimal maintenance. It's roots usually grow about 2-3 inches below the surface and are incredibly easy to remove, they usually grow straight down as well. Another option would be a ...


1

There are a few problems with that idea: Don't tread on any insects (e.g. ants) that will bite your feet. Likewise, don't tread on any bird droppings etc! The creeping plants won't stop at suppressing the weeds, they will also suppress your other plants when they are still small. If the creeping plants aren't strong growing enough to behave like "weeds" ...


1

I'm guessing it's one of the speedwells, or Veronicas - it would be very helpful to see a close up shot of an open flower to assist with ID, but it could be Veronica agrestis (field speedwell) Veronica persica or Veronica filiformis (creeping speedwell). Some of these are common turf weeds in other parts of the world, but they grow quite happily in borders ...


1

Bamboo's answer is great...just wanted to add a few things. Fall is a great time to grow grasses for lawns. They'll be able to root and become established during the winter season out-competing weeds. Rake those bare spots, use a spreader to apply seed, rake very lightly again and TAMP the seed and soil. This is a good time to aerate your lawn FIRST by ...


1

Some care needs to be taken with what you plant - you say the slope is four feet, and the wood dividers appear to be about a foot apart each. If you choose the wrong plant for the top, you could end up with it cascading right down to the bottom, over anything else you've planted in the lower parts. Heucheras come in a variety of leaf colours and do well in ...


1

Difficult for me to say as I'm in France, but it sounds to be a Chenopodiaceae (family)... You may look on the side of Polygonum, chenopodium... It is maybe Chenopodium pumilio Hope it leads you on a good "path" ;)


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