10

This site from Washington State University offers a wealth of information about apples and their uses. You'll find a long list of apple varieties, including type descriptions and whether they're best used for long storage; eating; cooking, as in pies and applesauce; and cider. I don't know where you live, and some of these are regionalized to western United ...


8

There seems to be a bit of confusion going on here. As you've discovered, Malus varieties, of which your crabapple is one, vary as to whether they're self pollinating or require another pollinator nearby, but the purpose of pollination is for fertilization of the flowers if you want fruit. Without fertilization, the flowers fade, as they usually do, but ...


7

Here are three apple books I would recommend for detailed info about different varieties: The New Book of Apples by Joan Morgan - It's expensive but well worth the investment. Apples of Uncommon Character by Rowan Jacobson Apples of North America by Tom Burford You can find these and other fantastic books here. You can also see if your public library ...


5

If you leave them be the roots from the plants will become thoroughly enmeshed to make one solid root pad. This is how forest/group plantings are made. As they thicken over the years, the trunks will begin to fuse. How long this takes, of course will depend upon how far apart they are and how fast these particular trees' trunks thicken. In a bonsai pot or ...


4

Cedar-Apple Rust This National Gardening Association report has good information about the problem. This is from part of that report. The first symptoms on apples are pale yellow spots on the upper surfaces of the leaves and on developing fruits in mid to late spring. The spots gradually get bigger and turn orange or red, and you may see black dots in the ...


3

It doesn't look too good - I note the bark lower down on the main trunk appears to have a longitudinal crack and parts of the bark are lifting off. Try scraping back the surface on some of the smaller branches with a fingernail if possible - if it's dry and brownish inside those branches are dead, which likely means the tree has died. The deposits are ...


3

There is no obvious reason why it wouldn't work. Many UK nurseries sell crab apples grafted onto apple rootstocks One possible issue with M26 is that it doesn't produce a very strong root system, and therefore it may need a permanent stake for wind protection, depending on how vigorously the crab apple wants to grow. If you want to try it, now is the right ...


3

The picture shows a shelf fungus, which indicates that the mycelium of the fungus has spread throughout the trunk. I'm very sorry, but this tree is terminally ill. My opinion is that you should cut it down before it breaks in a storm.


3

It can happen that you'll get no flowers due to missing the "chilling" requirement (the tree's calibration for "winter happened, OK to flower now.") That is commonly described as days below 45F, so freezing is not absolutely required for it, and it varies with different varieties. In my area we seem to have lost the flowers (and thus fruit) due to some wild ...


3

Penn State University has a nice overall discussion of pruning principles. One of those principles is the ability of old wood to produce or not produce new shoots. Generally the younger the wood, the more likely that a nice selection of new shoots will be produced. So you really don't want to let wood get older before pruning, otherwise you end up with a ...


3

In addition to the information here Found on a Red Cedar. What is it?, if you have any Red Cedar (Juniper) trees on your property, check them over - if you see evidence of this infection on them (and you will) clip out the affected parts now, as it says in the answer. There is no other treatment available. Unfortunately, if there are other Red Cedars in the ...


3

Sources of variatal information for apples. Agricultural Research Services Germplasm Resources Information Network. This is the most comprehensive list I found -- and it still misses 50% of the varieties I was seeking information on. http://www.ars-grin.gov/ Big Horse Creek Farm Descriptions of about 300 varieties. http://bighorsecreekfarm.com/apple-...


2

Dolgo is considered a semi-dwarfing stock. I believe grafting a crabapple tree onto a standard apple rootstock will produce a larger, but not full-sized tree. I haven't found any sources from people who have done it, but logically, evening out the characteristics (the smaller growth habit of the crab, and the bigger supply from the standard apple, which has ...


2

Yes its rust, best thing to do is remove the tree entirely including the stump as it will reshoot from the base and those bits will be infected too- the fungus is systemic and has infected every part of the tree, burn all affected parts, don't compost or bury any bit too, plus its often another plant is also infected too, so do a hunt around your garden and ...


1

@Bamboo 's answer is nicely non-invasive. But let me share my thoughts (which might have better been a comment). When you decide to kill it. Take a knife and slice several cm of the base trunk(vertically!) - about 3 times as deep as the bark is thick (so bark + twice more). Any moisture? No? Kill it then.


1

Unfortunately, if you wanted to grow a crabapple specifically to pick its fruits rather than simply as an ornamental tree, it would have been better to buy one or two cordon trained varieties on a semi dwarfing rootstock such as M26, such as those listed here https://www.pomonafruits.co.uk/fruit-nut-trees/cordon-columnar-fruit-trees/cordon-crab-apple-trees-...


1

A photograph or two of the affected tree might be useful, though if you can't see anything obvious, maybe not. Crabapples are best pruned in late winter or early spring, before the leaves and flowers arrive. Pruning later than that increases the risk of pathogenic infection (usually fungal) getting in to the sap stream of the tree, and it may be this is what'...


1

Prairie Magic: Was removed from my orchard due to vulnerability to fire blight. September Ruby keeps for 8-10 weeks. Can be over productive, must be thinned to obtain size 6.5 cm average. FB rating of F5 but has recovered from an infection. annually productive if thinned. Very hardy. Flavour is moderately acid and good for dessert.


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