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I have used EPDM pool liner with some success. It can be bought in whatever quantity off the roll at pond supply stores. It is UV stable, flexible and tough. Used in the ground it stopped creeping bellflower that has shallow roots but did not stop horsetails (equisetum) that seem to send roots out a deeper level.


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It's not terrible advice, but also maybe a bit of over-engineering something that's more of a social problem. You are unlikely to have significantly different soil needs since the plants will all have similar temperature, humidity, light, etc. (One side may get more light than the other, but still.) Also, the types of low-maintenance plants that people tend ...


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I think this is good advice, and your friend has given you good reasons as to why sharing the soil without some sort of barrier could be a problem. One thing to consider, though is drainage: would a barrier restrict any drainage holes in the bottom of the planter? I use aluminum flashing (used to prevent water from infiltrating around chimneys and ...


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If you made it out of copper, it would work even better, but that will be more expensive. Snails do not like to touch copper. A chemical reaction happens when they crawl over the metal, which causes unpleasant feelings on their skin. Al-tough not everyone will agree with me about this and I have seen snails just crawling over the copper, but most of them ...


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your plant is wilting and should probably be watered. This being said extreme wilting causing leaf dryness can increase chances of plant disease. It is hard to tell with just these pictures, but to the untrained eye it might be a disease or a potassium deficiency. To better assess the situation can you give me background info on your irrigation? Did you drop ...


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Like mentioned in the comments already, this is an outer pot where the inner pot goes in. So the inner pot is usually a plastic container with holes. When watering your plants, water drains through the holes and such an outer pot captures this water (just like a saucer would do as well). These outer pots are usually used indoor, so you can keep your ...


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Drill hole(s) in it. Masonry bits ( carbide tip) , do not turn fast and use water. I get neater holes using a smaller bit like 1/4 " to make the initial hole then use 1/2" bit to make a larger hole. A regular electric drill does best- you do not want impact.


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Drill holes into the bottom with a masonry bit.


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If this is plastic, try poking some holes in the bottom with a hot screwdriver.


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The larger size (200 and 1000 litre) containers are likely to be so heavy that they could be more than the load bearing capacity of the balcony. It's a difficult to be precise as there are too many variables such as the water/soil ratio and the load capacity of the balcony. Water weighs one kilogram per litre and soil might range from .2 to .4 kilogram per ...


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It might work, probably not. Precautions: Be prepared to lose the first harvest and some of the later ones to root rot. Lay a layer of stones at the bottom to give water a place to accumulate. Dig a vertical tunnel to those stones and observe for stale water accumulation.


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Has anyone tried using palm husk? It's light weight, can shed water, can retain water. Very high availability. Easy to grow. The boots could be incorporated along with the trunk. I have been told by a few palms intake sand as they grow and a reason for dulled chainsaws when pruning and felling. Walnut husk, peacan husks, sweet gums, egg corns. ...


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