5

I am on Long Island, in New York, zones 6 - 7. When we moved in to our current home, we inherited a sweet autumn clematis growing on the north wall of the house. It gets very little sun (if any) and it grows/climbs quickly, starting in early spring. Small white flowers bloom in the early fall. The plant is thick and green all summer. We also have a fair ...


5

Plumbago capensis, very nice, covered with flowers all the summer, no sun, no scent. Suffers a lot from ice. Lonicera caprifolium, forest plant, white flowers yellow or pink all the summer, delicious perfume, very tolerant to frost Hydrangea petiolaris, very nice, stand the cold to the foot. Appropriate mulch with dry leaves or straw. Thunbergia (...


4

I suspect a language problem: Blackberries (Rubus) are “mûre” in French, “mora” in Spanish and “amora” in Portuguese. -> which may easily be confused with Morus, the Genus of mulberries. But of course some prankster may have switched the labels, who knows? In any case, your plant looks indeed like a blackberry.


4

Yeah smells great that flower! I never propagated this plant, but according to 'the web' cuttings will root easily, and putting them in just water seems successful. Good luck.


2

When questions and gardeners come from all around the world it is often very difficult to provide answers that are good for where you live. I live in USDA zone 4 and have had the following experiences with these plants: plumbago capensis or leadwort has now been renamed Plumbago auriculata. It is hardy in Florida and parts of California and is a wonderful ...


2

Note that black walnut (Juglans nigra) has the highest level of juglone in all its parts, so that is a significant difference between it and Juglans regia, the common walnut. This link https://extension.psu.edu/landscaping-and-gardening-around-walnuts-and-other-juglone-producing-plants has plenty of suggestions for trees and shrubs growing around Walnut, ...


2

There is only one self clinging climbing plant which is evergreen in the UK, and that is Hedera and its varieties. If you choose one, you will need to block off the gaps in the fence to prevent any shoots forcing their way through. It is also likely that Hedera will 'root' into the fence. There are two other climbing plants which self cling - Hydrangea ...


2

The standard advice when potting plants into larger containers is almost always to move up by one pot size. There are, though, exceptions, and Campsis is one of them, primarily because, planted in spring, they grow rapidly and once it clings to a support, its then impossible to provide a larger pot later on. This plant should really be planted into at least ...


2

The biggest problem is being able to plant it close enough to your trees so that it can climb up them. Where you are this plant is only an annual, as it is in the UK, and reaches about 2.5 metres in a good year, but you can't plant too close to the roots of the trees because it will likely be deprived of both water and nutrients, you'd need to plant at ...


2

I wouldn't describe an open wall like that as "shady" whichever way it faces. You profile says Seattle so if it is facing directly east it will get 7 hours of direct sun per day in summer which is more than enough for any rose. The frame in your picture won't support any climbing plants on its own. Maybe there were some vertical posts into the ground below ...


2

Don't follow the advice to "cut it down in the spring" if you want flowers! There are three different groups of clematis, which flower at different times of the year and need pruning in different ways. That pruning method is WRONG for the one that you have. All clematis will grow and flower happily with no pruning at all, but that will result in a "top ...


2

Choosing a rose is somewhat more complicated than simply choosing it for the flower colour. Roses are also not particularly easy care plants - they require deadheading, spraying against pests and diseases, and pruning properly once a year. Most roses prefer as much sun as possible, but there are varieties which do quite well with much less sun on north or ...


2

Water shortage, I'd say; I, too, live in London, and only last Friday I had to run the sprinkler on the garden for an hour for some new planting because it was pretty dry. New plants need frequent and sufficient water, enough water to penetrate a rootball that goes down a good six inches below the soil - it will be some weeks before the plant puts out roots ...


1

I'm not entirely sure what the problem is, but would offer the same solution - stop feeding and increase watering. The symptoms on the leaves don't fit any of the usual problems a clematis might suffer, so it's probaby environmental, i.e, the growing conditions. If it gets a lot worse or other symptoms appear, please post again.


1

Depends on which clematis variety. On the assumption the Clematis is a smaller cultivar, or one that needs pruning back to 9 inches in winter, and you want it to climb up the rose, plant as close as 6-9 inches away from the rose roots - easier to plant both at the same time, putting the rose in first, then the clematis, so you don't accidentally damage the ...


1

I needed some siding done on the house and cut my wisteria down from sixteen feet tall to a three foot stub. It regrew to twenty feet tall in a single season. If it is a healthy vine you can be pretty hard cutting it back and it will be better for it.


1

While I can't offer any other suggestions for alternatives - from my experience with Clematis I would caution against it in this situation. Clematis enjoys a warmer position, not suited to full or part shade. It requires protection from frost. In relation to your other questions with climbers: No you usually will not have to overly train a climber, it ...


1

There are 3 I'd recommend; an evergreen would be Clematis armandii, white flowers, tough tough plant and fragrant, wow fragrant. Another would be Akebia quinata; mine in zone 5 was evergreen. Akebia quinata Yummy to walk beneath if that is possible, such as a gate. Profuse yet dainty purple flowers. The third is a perennial that will grow 25 to 35 feet ...


1

Nice suggestions from Violaprile, but I tend to agree with Kevinsky's comments. Hydrangea anomala (syn petiolaris) will be just fine in your zone, but is not evergreen, though it does flower. Some Clematis cultivars which prefer a bit of shade, or at least do fine with it, are: C. Hagley Hybrid, Nelly Moser, General Sikorski, Henryi, John Warren, Lady ...


1

Money Plant grows very well in India (USDA Hardiness 11-13), I am not sure for your zone. However if it grows near you, it will not take much attention. It grows very fast, likes to hang.


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