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4

I have Trachelospermum Jasminoides, Fake Jasmine, for this. It copes well with clay and wind. It fares less well in the shadier parts of the garden but does survive. You wil need a trellis or similar for it to climb up and it will not be as dense a growth as cotoneaster or berberis but it breaks up the wind effectively and is covered in fragrant flowers all ...


4

Probably the toughest one that will tolerate the conditions you mention is Prunus laurocerasus, commonly known as cherry laurel. There are a few varieties of this plant now,some with narrower, neater leaves. It does get quite large though at up to 25 feet with a spread of up to 10/12 feet over time. Cotoneaster cornubia is semi evergreen, has red berries in ...


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Elaeagnus x ebbingei and Elaeagnus × ebbingei 'Limelight' (a nicely variegated type) are both fast growing, tough evergreens. As ever, you'll get the best results if you plant and maintain the shrubs properly. Dig nice big planting holes. Water as necessary until they're established and keep the surrounding area (a one metre plus circle around each shrub) ...


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I recommend that you plant at least part of the area with rain garden plants. These are plants that thrive in poorly drained areas. The Rain Garden Alliance is an excellent source to help you get started. It also contains a list of possible plants for you to use. The Alliance is US-based, I think, but many of the plants listed should be available in the UK. ...


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Although the soil seems wet now, even planting a few herbaceous plants will quickly dry out the soil. TLDR: Start with a tomatoes or grapes. Ferns are also pretty apt. Don't use a lot of mulch, half an inch at best. I wouldn't say no mulch because mulch helps with weed suppression. Soil amendments: Don't use pinebark. Gypsum can help if you have clay soil. ...


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We are told that back in ancient history when the Roman armies wished to punish a village for non-cooperation the commander would issue an order "salt their fields"; This did not work very well in some areas because the soil was reasonably light and normal rains would flush the salt down out of reach of the roots of plants so crops would grow again ...


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I did a similar thing using concrete blocks as part of a retaining wall a few years ago. It worked fine once I realized that the blocks absorbed a lot of the water I applied to the plants. Once I switched to plants that tolerated dryer conditions it was lovely and held its own well and the plants grew well. I would recommend using trailing rosemary, ...


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