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A technique called "air layering" is likely to be more successful for you compared to regular cuttings. Citrus does not root readily in water. Most propagators find that air at the cutting end and perfect control of temperature and humidity as the roots are established are critical. In addition the ease with which roots form can vary quite a lot ...


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Citrus grows best in slightly acid soil conditions, and when in a pot needs good drainage. So this means potting soil that has no alkaline components and watered with water that is not "hard", that is not containing basic/alkaline components like lots of calcium. Clean rain or melted snow has a pH of about 5.6 which is acid enough to counteract a ...


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I think this is a hot pepper plant, one of the many ornamental cultivars of Capsicum frutescens. Although often grown as annuals, most cultivars of this species are short-lived perennials that can grow into a small shrub in frost-free climates. Capsicum frutescens cultivars are commonly used as ornamental plants. They're usually called "ornamental ...


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It sounds like the cutting has come from the wrong part of the tree and may not work as a cutting to develop a new plant. When a fruit tree grows it produces two types of wood, vegetative and flower/fruit producing. Distinguishing signs vary, but for many trees the vegetative buds are long and pointy and the flowering buds are squat, fat and blunt. Once cut, ...


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This looks like tangerines. I think your lemon was grafted on a tangerine root stock. With the frost the lemon part of the tree died probably, but the root stock survived. It now produces nice tangerines, you say they are sweet and nice in tastes, so you were lucky that your lemon tree was not grafted on a sour orange root stock, but on this sweet tangerine ...


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