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4

With a sharp knife gently scrape away the bark near the base of the plant. If it shows green, it's alive. If it shows brown, it's dead.


3

Soil for citrus trees should be slightly acid, not alkaline, but above all should be well drained. They don't like to have their feet wet, so if there is a risk that when you water the tree the water will sit around and flood the roots then the tree will demonstrate its unhappiness by not growing or shedding leaves. Quite possibly when you moved the tree ...


3

Yes definitely. The heat will make the plant wilt and this means it has water loss. The plants usually dry up and turn into a crunchy brown before dying. If you provide some temporary shade this will help immensely! You can get a burlap and put it over the tree and this usually is not expensive. If you don't have a burlap you can use a bed sheet and create ...


2

Well it's not a usual way to grow a new clementine plant, they are usually grafted onto a different rootstock. Grafting of plants, apart from the need to recreate the exact same fruits, is done for other reasons too; the rootstock may supply vigour to the grafted plant, or may restrict its overall size over time, or cuttings of the plant itself may prove ...


2

Wings and spikes are pretty characteristic of vigorous growth on citrus, whether basal sprouts or upper branches. Watersprouts are an indication that something is stopping the flow of sap into the upper parts of the tree, so it is important to determine what that might be. Whether it is physical damage, insect, or disease should be fairly evident from the ...


2

I think this is a hot pepper plant, one of the many ornamental cultivars of Capsicum frutescens. Although often grown as annuals, most cultivars of this species are short-lived perennials that can grow into a small shrub in frost-free climates. Capsicum frutescens cultivars are commonly used as ornamental plants. They're usually called "ornamental ...


2

Orange peel rich in phosphorus, nitrogen, and potassium. Adding citrus peels to the compost pile definitely increases the nutrition level. Recommend to cut the peels into small pieces. It increases the decomposing time. Before peel, the citrus properly washes it. Then any chemicals or toxins will be washed away.


2

Some sources believe that citrus peels deter worms and other organisms from breaking down the compost as usual, but its more to do with their natural acidity rather than any chemicals that may have been used. You can put citrus peels in the compost, but they are better chopped up small (they take a long time to break down completely otherwise); how you add ...


2

It sounds like the cutting has come from the wrong part of the tree and may not work as a cutting to develop a new plant. When a fruit tree grows it produces two types of wood, vegetative and flower/fruit producing. Distinguishing signs vary, but for many trees the vegetative buds are long and pointy and the flowering buds are squat, fat and blunt. Once cut, ...


1

Persian Lime cannot stand more than a few degrees below freezing before it is damaged. Snow on the ground indicates that the temperature went at least to freezing and maybe below, at which point the trunk will suffer damage. Leaf fall may have been first due to low temperatures but will have been reinforced by trunk freezing and possibly root damage as well. ...


1

This looks like tangerines. I think your lemon was grafted on a tangerine root stock. With the frost the lemon part of the tree died probably, but the root stock survived. It now produces nice tangerines, you say they are sweet and nice in tastes, so you were lucky that your lemon tree was not grafted on a sour orange root stock, but on this sweet tangerine ...


1

When producing multi-variety apples, the usual practices is to do a single bud for each cultivar. By using the same style at the same level in the tree, they are getting equal resources. But easy answer: Try it. Leave enough of the tree below your graft attempt to try again next year if it doesn't take.


1

I had a Clementine seedling for years that always dropped most of its leaves every time I brought it outdoors and then again every time I brought it indoors. It was light-related: the tree didn't like going from a mostly indirect-lighted location to a mostly sunny location and vice versa. I got rid of the problem by keeping the Clementine in a mostly shaded ...


1

The yellow leaf colour, chlorosis, indicates a root issue from either nutrient deficiency or a watering problem. Citrus likes a freely draining mix on the acidic side. The nutrients are unlikely to be depleted after a year so it means it can't access the nutrients due to a pH issue, or the roots are damaged. I'd suggest repot with a citrus potting mix, ...


1

The little lemon tree will be quite alright after some water has been given. Two or three days will be enough. Important things not to do: don't overwater; do not change the position drastically, a bit of shade (umbrella) is enough; don't fertilize; most importantly: don't panic!


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