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12

It looks in your photos as if you have it in a small cup with no drainage. I would surmise from that & the condition of the leaves that it is over-watered and probably suffering from root rot. Replant it into a container with drainage holes with a rich, well draining potting soil. Keep the soil damp but not soggy and give it some time.


11

It is probably suffering in part from transplant shock. Give it some time to adjust. Also, make sure you are not over-watering. If you stick your finger an inch or so into the soil, it should feel cool & damp, but not soggy. Let the soil dry to this point, but not completely dry & then saturate when watering. Wait until the soil has dried to the ...


9

Grubs like the one you've pictured feed on plant roots. If there are a lot of them, then yes, they are doing damage. You may just not be noticing it yet. The worst part is they will eventually pupate into adult beetles, and those will work on damaging the above-ground parts of your plants. If they are Japanese Beetles (hard to say without more info but the ...


9

We get a lot of questions about member of the citrus family. Some varieties will flower and set fruit indoors. So, yes, you can grow citrus indoors but they are challenging to keep looking nice at the size of your plant without a greenhouse. is the pot the right size? This depends on whether it is pot bound or not. It sounds about right. This is part of ...


9

They are getting pollinated well enough, you can see the young fruit hips in those pictures. If there wasn't any fruit set, the ovaries would fall of the same time as the flower and you'd see no hips. Your problem is either lack of or too much nutrition and water. Wide temp swings can also cause infant fruit to fall off.


8

I believe that what you're describing is a type of citrus medica commonly known under many names such as Citron, Etrog, Esrog, Turanj, Bara Nimbu, e.t.c. and I'd guess they also come in all kinds of shapes and sizes. I've seen really odd octopus-like looking fingered etrog ones with their bottom half split into many arms or fingers, but most would look like ...


8

It would seem the scion is at the base of your plant, as shown in the second picture. Therefore, the branch you're concerned about is not a sucker because it doesn't arise from below the scion, or graft, or from below soil level. It might be a watersprout, although it doesn't look overly vigorous, and you will know whether its growing much faster than the ...


8

Looks like you have at least two problems. Let's take the last image first which appears to show Citrus Leaf Miner damage. You can see the channels that the miner has burrowed into the leaf. The other images show a plant under a lot of stress. The leaves show a lack of nutrients - the stem looks as though it was strong and healthy at one time, but then ...


7

Those look like citrus mites to me. But it also looks like your tree may have been suffering from heat and/or moisture stress. This makes it much more susceptible to infestations of this sort, so as you treat this you need to check your cultivation practices and correct anything that is amiss. There are chemical treatments for citrus mites. You can also ...


7

That picture shows what looks remarkably like a chafer grub, commonest in lawns, but also found in borders and vegetable beds, where it particularly likes root crops. Japanese beetle grubs are similar, but have, if you look closely, a sort of hairy spine - small, fine hairs that stick up, which I cannot see in the picture, so closer examination would be good ...


7

The seediness of Clementine mandarins depends upon the availability of pollen from other citrus varieties when the tree is in bloom. Clementines are typically low seeded or seedless when grown in a large block of a single variety. However, if bees show up with pollen of certain other varieties, Clementines will become seedy. Pummelos, for example, have ...


7

The dark green veins and light green leaf material also indicate an Iron/Manganese deficiency which is very common with citrus grown on alkaline soils. See here for more detail. Repotting with new soil, more light, more drainage and a touch of acid or citrus fertilizer should fix all the symptoms.


7

Usually we reserve the term "sucker" to shoots arising from below the graft, and "water shoots" for those arising above the graft. The difference is that suckers allow inferior root stock vegetation to take over, eventually overwhelming the tree. Water shoots are the proper scion material, but in terms of quality and quantity of fruit produced (which is ...


6

Grafting compatibility depends on genetic similarity. Because of this, the most successful grafts are between species, within the genera. Inter-generic grafts are usually not successful, but in some cases where the genera are genetically similar, grafting is rather reliable (like the practice of grafting pear cultivars onto the hardier and more resilient ...


6

Looks like a nitrogen deficiency as is seen here. There are no other signs of typical citrus problems such as iron manganese deficiency which gives dark veins and lighter leaf area. Some of this may be the soil mix. I see lots of shredded bark which, when combined with a moist soil, could be taking up nitrogen that the citrus roots would otherwise use. ...


6

I've seen many citrus trees in pots. In fact where I live that is all I see since they'd have to come inside during the winter. I'd think that the trees would do fine in a pot. If you get a decent size pot they will grow to fill that pot. I'm not sure what you mean by stunted by being in a pot. The tree size will be limited because of the pot, but if ...


6

I apply predatory nematodes every year for these and wireworm. Do it while the soil is still slightly damp so the nematodes can work their way down into the soil. Treat both your lawns and garden area as you don't want any sort of "reservoir" that allows them to transfer back into either area. They tend to go after carrots, I can tell how effective the ...


6

More seeds is a sign of stress. The plant produces more seeds when the chances of survival (from the tree's perspective) grow slimmer and slimmer. A well cared for, fertilized, pruned, and irrigated tree will have much better fruit with fewer seeds than a neglected tree. So yes, with the tree 'fallen to some neglect', it makes logical sense that your tree ...


6

Sfgate and the other content mills are crap. Lots of times articles are written by people with little or no experience other than the ability to paraphrase. I remember reading a lawn care article written by a hair stylist. Most of the time they just copy stuff from other sources and reword them. This page from a dwarf citrus grower indicates you don't need ...


6

Citrus typically takes a long time to ripen. Valencia oranges, for example, will still be completing the ripening process even after the tree has flowered and set fruit for the next season. You did not specify what type of limes you have. Key limes are typically shorter (three to four months in ideal conditions) but can take longer depending on lighting and ...


6

This has nothing to do with what pollinated your trees this year. But apparently some of your trees have a trace of blood oranges in their ancestral line. Oranges (Citrus x sinensis) are a hybrid between pomelo and mandarin and all citrus are rather prone to hybridization and mutations. So why do you suddenly see red streaks? I blame the weather. Did you ...


6

The smaller the tree was the more likely it is to grow back. Trees put on new growth by activating dormant buds along the length of the trunk. The smaller the branch or trunk the more dense those buds are. Be sure to keep grass and weeds growing around the stump/stub cut back and let light get to the bark. Unfortunately no one can tell you for sure if your ...


6

Looks like a scale infestation - the ants are there to collect the honeydew they produce. You will need to treat the scale, but its not that easy to get rid of them, the cottony covering they produce protects them from most insecticides, but its more effective on crawlers. Neem spray, used 4 or 5 times over a period of time should do the trick - more ...


5

In my experience, the grubs will not be a problem in the veggie garden. That said, once they go through metamorphosis, they very well may damage your plants. So, when I loosen the soil in my veggie garden in the spring, I leave the grubs on the surface for the birds to get. As for your potted orange, what do you mean when you say it is totally infested? How ...


5

If you can remove them from the leave then they are scale. Due to the dark colour I believe they are Black Scale (Saissetia oleae). They suck juices from the plant and excrete a sugary sap. Look for sticky leaves. Ants are sometimes seen in close company with these pests. For small plants some control can be done with soap and water but a complete answer ...


5

If you only have two leaves, those will be the cotyledons, and aren't true leaves. The second pair of leaves will be though, but you need to wait to pot it on until a good root system has been formed. You then move it to a pot that's a bit bigger, then later a bigger one again, till after a few years, it ends up in a 15 gallon pot. While its in the pot it's ...


5

If you are comfortable with rind grafting (pictured below), Then yes, these trees are compatible. This is best done in early spring just before bud break. Be sure you leave some original growth, to support the whole thing while the grafts take. This is the method used for changing larger trees for different fruit. The picture below is from an apple tree, ...


5

I believe that (in the first picture) is citrus whitefly (Dialeurodes citri). The small white dots are probably the eggs and larvae (the nymphs fasten to the leaf undersides like scale - see below). These insect suck plant juices, and so are considered pests. The nymph is a flat, elliptical, scale-like object, closely fastened to the underside of a leaf. ...


5

Citrus often take five years or more to flower and fruit. Some take more than others. Overferilizaion with nitrogen can cause some citrus to just be vegetative and not flower. This can result from you giving the plants too much, or them getting it from your near-by lawn care. You can avoid the lawn-care situation by not applying lawn fertilizer in the ...


5

As you may know, plants can be victim of different kinds of affections : Nutrients deficiency Parasits assaults Meteorological perturbations First of all, you should check for parasits, even if I don't think the leaf color is caused by a predator or a disease. Return a leaf, better with a magnifying glass, and try to spot living / moving creatures. For ...


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