7

You may be watering too much if your soil is wet all the time. The top inch of soil should be allowed to dry out before you water your plants again, and the pot should be allowed to drain freely in between and not sit constantly in water. Constantly wet soil for most plants means you will get rotted roots. Rotting roots below will produce brown leaves ...


6

Use a fertilizer high in nitrogen. This is true for most herbs and grassy plants like corn because Nitrogen is primarily responsible for vegetative growth. it is also responsible for increased yield and quality source Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potassium are the three major macro nutrients that plants use. Fertilizers show what percentage of each of ...


6

I am in shock over $4 bunches of cilantro. Here is is very cheap like parsely - under a $1 a bunch at my grocery - but I still like to grow it at home, because I can rarely use the whole bunch while it is fresh. The trick to growing cilantro at home is to do succession sowing and frequent cutting. As itsmatt mentioned, it bolts quickly in warm weather. I ...


5

I would suggest not thinning them yet either. As @michelle suggested, wait at least until the true leaves appear. You can thin by harvesting once a second set of true leaves develop. (In the time since you posted the question, they may have matured enough to do so). Also, while selling herbs at a market, the farmer I worked for recommended leaving a few ...


4

I think the word will be "successfully" since you've got a bit cooler climate. :) Cilantro bolts when it warms up. Definitely likes the cooler weather. I learned this the hard way two years ago. We had what seemed like two weeks of spring before it heated up and was hot all summer. The Cilantro quickly went to seed, which was discouraging. I think it ...


4

Answer to part one of your question: Use the sniff test. Cilantro and parsley each have a distinct smell. You may want to take a bit and crush it a bit to release more aroma.


4

Most plants form a pair of cotyledons or "seed leaves" upon germinating, which don't look like the other, subsequent leaves. These only serve to get growth started, and you should expect them to wither away once the plant's true leaves get established.


4

The trouble with supermarket herbs is, they're surrounded by a plastic bag which supports the foliage - when you remove that outer wrap, they often flop over completely. Usually, with basil and others, you can water and they will stand up again, but my coriander (cilantro as you call it there) looks very similar to yours, bought about 4 or 5 days ago, and ...


4

Wilting is a sign of transplant shock; a severe change in environment, or damage to the roots, may cause issues like this, too. In your case, I'm thinking it's just not hardened off to your windowsill. Whatever the cause the solution is often (not always) the same. Extra leafy plants can be especially problematic, since they require more water than plants ...


4

I seed the stuff thick, and never thin. Always seem to get a good crop. My current batch is on its fourth harvest now. I chop it to about 50mm (2") with scissors. Looks like it's getting ready to bolt/flower this time. Freeze the chopped excess spread out on a cookie tray then jar frozen chunks to preserve flavor.


3

What you bought was not “a cilantro plant” but a whole cluster of seedlings. Herbs that are sold in the produce section of stores are often not produced for long-term planting, but for a somewhat extended storage - think of them as a bunch, but with roots attached to prevent immediate wilting. For that, seeds are planted very densely, way more than you ...


3

This is a flowering stem off your cilantro - the little round things beneath the remains of the flowers are coriander seeds http://www.vegetariantimes.com/blog/edible-gardening-101-harvesting-coriander-seeds/ You probably didn't notice the flowering stem arriving, and it would have contributed to the rest of the plant withering and dying back.


3

Technically you're right - not more than two, maybe three, plants in each 15 cm pot, or they won't have room to develop properly. Oregano spreads sideways and not up - planted outdoors in a garden bed, it makes a good ground cover, spreading up to 2 feet easily in a sunny spot; it will cover the entire top of your pot over a fairly short time, so only one ...


3

It is very difficult to see, since the photo is a bit blurry, but this looks to me like parsley. If an ID is important to you at this point, you can check the seeds. Parsley seeds are small and kind of football-shaped. Cilantro seeds are a bit larger and completely round. Either way, you will definitely need to start with a new plant. Once parsley and ...


3

It looks like you may be experiencing problems from a nitrogen deficiency. I'm guessing that, because the soil isn't entirely decomposed, so the undecomposed organic matter will still be pulling nitrogen from the soil. I've noticed that soil you buy at nurseries isn't necessarily the most nutrient rich, although it is usually dark, with plenty of organic ...


3

I have never had issues growing cilantro inside. Here are a few things to check on Heat - Cilantro does not do well with heat. Put a thermometer on or near the pot. cilantro prefer early and late day sun, make sure it shaded during the heat of the day. Planting Bowl - at least 18 inches wide and 8 to 10 inches deep. Planting - Put the seeds in the soil ...


2

You can harvest the seeds just as they go pink/brown and dry them successfully for both spice and germination (about 75% success). This avoids them falling off but you do need to check them often.


2

Personally, I would leave them a little longer. Things can and do go wrong with seedlings this small. When you have several true leaves on each plant (so leaves that look like cilantro, not the cotyledons like the one you are pinching in the photo), then choose the strongest and thin the others out. I would absolutely snip them off with a scissors to thin. ...


2

Yes you should thin out 2 of the 3, by gently pulling the seedling out. (Snipping them off would not be the way to go, it may encourage bushier plant to emerge.) From WikiHow Prevent overcrowding. Stop the cilantro plants from becoming overcrowded by thinning the seedlings when the cilantro is 2 to 3 inches (5.1 to 7.6 cm) tall. Pull out the smaller ...


2

Answer to part two: Once either parsley or coriander/chilantro has gone to seed there is no real further kitchen use "in it". Unless you plan to harvest coriander seeds, of ourse, but the "green bits" are done. Cilantro is an annual, parsley a biennial plant, once they've developed seeds, the plant dies. So no matter what the sniff test says with regard to ...


2

It's a somewhat borderline case. For those plants that have just a bit of the top roots left, you probably won't be able to plant them with success. But I also see some longer roots and what looks like one plant with a slightly more complete root system. As a gardener, I would seriously be tempted to try and plant this specimen. If you do so, make sure you ...


2

Coriander is an annual. The leaves are commonly called cilantro. It belongs to the Apiaceae family of plants (once called Umbelliferae from the shape of the flowering 'umbels'). Members include a number of herbs and vegetables such as parsley, dill, caraway, carrot, parsnip and celery. Some of the members are annuals, some biennials and others perennial. ...


2

This is an excellent project for you to be doing and learning from. Can't just throw seed in the ground and expect to EAT anything anytime soon to save your life. You need to use potting soil whenever you plant anything in pots. Planting seeds you need TINY pots...inch to 2 inches in diameter and as deep...maximum. You need to keep moist, not wet. ...


2

You should use rich soil and a balanced NPK fertilizer but supplement it with additional N and add calcium. This promotes good, fast growth, but leaf size is a matter of the strain of coriander and especially the temperature. In many regions it is considered a spring and fall crop because once temperatures get above about 75F and the plant has matured a ...


1

Good that you used potting soil, and the pot has drainage holes. However, we can't see the pot, so don't know how big it is, which might be a factor. If it's too large, trying to keep the roots of your little plants supplied with water means you have to keep the soil in the pot too wet, but without seeing the pot, it's hard to say. What is a factor is ...


1

This is a typical case of over watering. Once a day is too much unless you have high temperatures. It also looks like you do not have enough drainage in your compost. This leads to poor “particle air porosity”, basically your compost is solid with no air gaps for water to drain. I also think you need more sun. Coriander or Cilantro is a Mediterranean herb ...


1

As it turns out, it seems the setup I had with the lights I'm using (2x SunBlaster T5HO) was a bit too intense for these plants. I moved the pot out to a West facing window that gets late afternoon/evening light, and within the first day I noticed improvement. The plants have straightened up considerably and are starting to get their nice green color back. ...


1

I suspect your seedlings need nutrition. Let me explain in a little more detail as to my reasons why... I’m not familiar with “Pro-Mix seed starting mix” (seems that it is a US product), so I looked up the company website for the product. It claims... Organic fertilizer that gradually feeds plants for up to 3 months Once seedlings progress beyond ...


1

Your plant looks to be perfectly healthy. However, check the soil and the drainage if the plant is getting too wet then yellowing leaves could be a sign of overwatering. On the other hand, you have soil fluctuations in soil PH and over fertilization could produce the same effects on the plant which leads to root rot. If I was in your position I would let it ...


1

It's an annual plant - however, if you let it go to seed after it flowers, it will seed itself in the surrounding area, so hopefully, you'll always have one or two (or maybe several) plants ongoing, so long as it doesn't get too cold where you are - I note that Idaho ranges from USDA zone 3 up to 7b. More information here http://homeguides.sfgate.com/...


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