Hot answers tagged

10

Pick them as soon as they are as ripe as you want them. They won't get any bigger, and too many fruit will restrict the formation of more fruit. If you live in a dry climate, then @Brian's suggestion of hanging them up is definitely the way forward, and is very traditional in places like New Mexico. @Kate's dehydrator should work in a humid climate, but ...


10

The aim of it is to mimic the action of a bird's intestines prior to pooing out the seed - many seeds which pass through a bird's digestive system germinate more readily, because the outer coating of the seed has been either thinned or softened as a result, making it easier for the seed to germinate. Chili pepper seeds (depending on variety) are known to be ...


9

I'd say the stress of replanting is causing this non-growth. Small damages to roots and new type of soil. The seedlings need to recover. I'd be patient.


8

I think you overwater the chilli plant. The leaves are not very healthy. Chilli likes also dry climate, so try to water a lot less. One or twice a week. I would also not put so much fertiliser. Once every two or three month should be enough (and possibly one every year, but possibly also changing the soil). Chilli doesn't produce a lot of green, or big ...


7

Harvest them before they freeze, or the resulting mushiness will ruin everything and they will rot. Jalapenos are picked green - if you leave them on the plant they will turn red, which isn't bad, just unexpected. I llke to pickle jalapenos. I add a little turmeric and onion flakes to hot vinegar, use a cold pack technique, and process them well. The ...


7

All peppers are perennial in their native habitat. They are grown as annuals elsewhere. You can technically overwinter peppers indoors, and given the right conditions they will survive. Peppers are like tomatoes in that they can't survive a hard freeze, so consider it gone.


7

I wouldn't use them - any plant sold as 'ornamental' may have been produced by the growers using systemic pesticide/fungicide treatments not suitable for edible foods, and traces of which will be within the tissues of the plant and the fruits - the use of the term 'ornamental' means the growers are not restricted to non systemic, intended for human ...


6

General observations They all look normal enough and if they have grown that large from starters and have fruited then they must be happy with where you have them. One thing I would suggest by looking at your pictures, the plants don't look to be supported enough. Chilli plants have lots of branches that branch out from the base and continue to branch ...


6

if you want to grow chili peppers then you want lots of light. Getting a crop to grow indoors is far different than just getting a plant to grow. Your only feasible option is high intensity discharge lights. Wikipedia describes them as HID lamps have made indoor gardening practical, particularly for plants that require high levels of direct sunlight ...


6

I live in Delaware and have already harvested my jalapeno and chili peppers. If you do nothing but leave them on the dining room table, some of the green peppers will ripen to red, some will dry out (get wrinkly, but remain edible), and many will start rotting or growing mold. You can freeze them whole or sliced, but I prefer drying. I dry the chili peppers ...


6

Curling as in cupped and deformed? Or curling as in wilting? Calcium is needed for the construction of cell walls. If calcium is missing when cell construction occurs, you get something that looks like this: That's a fairly extreme example, but illustrates the cupping and curling of the leaves. Soil is likely to be deficient in calcium in high rainfall ...


6

Those white hairs (marked in green) are trichomes, which are a perfectly normal part of the plant. The little spots (marked in red) however look like edema, which indicate too much moisture or over-watering. Try watering them less, or less often (mine do well with being watered only every other day) and since you're growing indoors, air the room regularly (...


6

Red peppers are usually considered hotter, but sweeter, than green fruits. Here is a thread where everyone agrees on that point. But the heat level often goes along with the stress level of the plant. most of the people on this thread also think red is hotter. If you water only minimally, grow the plant in scorching sun, and are skimpy on the fertilizer, you ...


6

Here's what I would do - thin that pot out a bit. Often I just snip the seedlings off with a pair of scissors rather than pulling them out. That helps to avoid disturbing the tender roots of the seedlings you wish to keep. I'd resist going down to 1 or 2 yet, instead I would thin it out a bit to perhaps the 4-6 strongest looking seedlings that aren't ...


6

The most likely explanation is too much sun too quickly - the chlorophyll content in the leaves is greatest on the upper surface, and its the chlorophyll that absorbs sunlight. Your plant, being exposed to sun suddenly, flipped its leaves to absorb less of it - this is not an unusual event on pepper plants and it shouldn't affect its fruiting. Next time you ...


6

Ornamental chile peppers are perfectly safe to eat, including Little Elf. I've only grown one kind of ornamental pepper, so far: Chinese 5 Color. I understand Chinese 5 Color is supposed to taste better than most ornamental peppers do. Usually, ornamental peppers are not said to have much taste appeal. Chinese 5 Color tastes pretty good when it's purple (...


6

Possible causes: - overwatering - drought - cold water - air humidity too high or too low, because it affects pollination and unpollinated flowers drop - insufficient calcium or magnesium - not enough light - fungal infection As you can see, there are many possible causes, that's why, in order to help, we need to see some pictures.


6

A month is not a particularly alarming amount of time for a chile pepper of any variety to stay green, especially depending on your soil and growing conditions. If the variety isn't used to the growing conditions, it's possible that this might also delay ripening. Carolina Reapers are supposed to take between 70 to 90 days after the transplant before ...


6

I'll help with a few suggestions on pruning. First however, you need to know that those leaves FEED your plant. Topping to make a plant thicker is fine but this usually works best with lots of sun. Your plant is struggling to make enough food for itself. It is long and lanky because it is not getting enough light. The leaves get thin and larger to be ...


5

I dry my peppers by stringing them up with a needle and thread and then I hang them in the opening between our kitchen and porch which has a wood burning stove in it. After a couple weeks the peppers are dry enough to store in bags or jars. I've done this with Thai Chilies and Tabasco Peppers.


5

This can happen when the stem is still quite soft, with a thin skin, and the cells are full of water. It happens more often on fruits (tomatoes, cherries, grapes, etc.) and is known as cracking. The plant will have a shorter, sturdier stem and smaller, less heavy leaves if grown under stronger light. Your plant is top-heavy and leaning, and that, combined ...


5

Excessive nitrogen, heat stress, insufficient or fluctuating water availability are the usual causes. If you know your plants haven't been subjected to fluctuation in temperatures, and you're not feeding excessively with nitrogen rich fertiliser, look at your watering regime. Water supplies should be regular and sufficient to the plant's needs when its ...


5

What are you doing for pollination? They do self pollinate, but without wind nor insects it can be hard. I only overwinter my habanero plants indoors, but the best I've got from fully indoor flowers has been 3 habaneros from two different plants. All of them had about two to three viable seeds, so I could be wrong but I'm assuming it's more a matter of ...


5

(Using Eggplants as a proxy - they are the same family - I've never grown Chilies though) - This is probably not something to worry too about - its most likely simply due to stress (ie stress of transplanting). It could also be related to extremes in temperature. You may want to ensure the plants are getting adequate water, but the leaves look healthy ...


5

Well something's been causing physical damage or nibbling on the leaves - on the twisted one, the damage would have taken place when the leaf was much smaller, causing it to grow in this distorted fashion. In the second photo, there appears to be something suggestive of black blobs (aphids?) at the base of the newest leaves, but I can't see what they are ...


5

There are some chilis that are generally harvested when green - jalapeño, rocoto sometimes - but in most cases you'll want to wait until they ripen to their final color. The heat is typically present in the unripe green fruit, but the sugars and other flavors that give each variety their specific flavor profiles will not be developed until the color changes. ...


5

Those are jalapeno chilies. They get redder and develop these white striations (stretch marks) as they age. You'll find the chili on the left to be less hot and progressively getting hotter to the hottest on the right.


5

And another bug to consider are lace wing bugs. The control for this or scale or flea beetles or aphids is simply a NEEM drench. Making a large container of NEEM solution, turning this plant upside down and gently swishing. One treatment will not eradicate your problem. Be sure to treat the top of your soil (do not soak just lightly spray). It will take ...


5

It's probably just sun damage due to the transplant shock, since those leaves are used to a different kind and amount of light. I have a pepper in that sort of situation, and I had some tomatoes in a situation like that, too (but it was more obviously a light issue with the tomatoes than with the peppers—I'm less sure it's the case with the peppers, but I'm ...


5

As is often pointed out in books on small-space gardening, spacing recommendations aren't set to maximise yield per unit area, but yield per plant. If 3 plants per pot works, carry on. You'll get more chillies this way than growing only 1/3 of the plants. You may be able to get bigger fruit by thinning them. You may need to water and fertilise more often ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible