2

I think the answer is probably yes. Your red line seems to be at the place where the graft was made. Add soil/compost up to the level of the graft. It would benefit the tree to have a mulch of 2"/3" on top of this but be sure to keep the mulch away from the bark of the tree. The mulch will help keep the roots cool in summer, suppress weeds and ...


2

An "open center" is common for bearing fruit trees; Then you don't have a tall main trunk that is inconvenient to harvest. Generally the lower the branches are, the easier to harvest. If you do not expect to pick fruit ,trim it or not , any style you want.


2

It looks like borer damage. They are difficult to control as they are in the wood. Some can be killed by pushing a wire into the holes if the holes are relatively straight.The tree does not look good.


2

Andrew, I agree with Bamboo, the problem is not that a leaf is touching soil. There are a couple of hints in your photos to suggest over-watering. Looking at the damage on the first and second photo, there seems to be some spongy cell degradation, prior to browning. This kind of leaf damage is typical of plants that have been sitting wet, with insufficient ...


2

I wouldn't worry about pruning off the leaf - the problem is likely that the plant is growing indoors - it needs to be outside. I don't know what your outdoor temperatures are like currently, but (assuming it's not bitterly cold) it's probably best to harden it off over a period of a week or so by leaving it out during the middle of the day for about 3/4 ...


1

Various species and varieties have different typical flowering durations, but there's generally a good amount of similarity. Some cherry trees, eg some mature older variety sweet dark cherries, may sometimes flower quite intensively for over a week, some branches on the same tree flowering predominantly several days apart. And for the same tree, production ...


1

These are suffering from drought, same as your lilac bushes. At minimum, one inch of water per week, all at once, is what your shrubs need. You can use the trickle method or a sprinkler to deliver the water - if you use a sprinkler, then that's typically one-half to one hour of water once per week (depends on sprinkler type), but this is also dependent on ...


1

No it's not normal at all. There are various causes for cherry leaves curling - the two most common are cherry aphid infestation, and cherry leaf curl fungal disease. It may be that your tree had an infestation of cherry aphid before it was supplied to you, but I'm not seeing aphids at the moment. I particularly don't like the crinkled effect on the leaves, ...


1

First, don't worry about the red bumps on the leaf stems; these are nectaries and they are meant to be there. You may notice ants visiting them because the nectar they produce is meant to attract some beneficial insects as part of the tree's defence against other insect invaders. They are not what is causing the problem with the leaves.Second, your tree is ...


1

I cannot give you much information. But one thing I could say is with what the leaf's look like. Its some kind of spore disease of some sort. they spread very easily. Droplets of rain can spread it easily. I recommend Cutting off infected branches in a couple year process to not exceed 25% of canopy in one year. Disinfect your cutting shears after ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible