11

Depending on where you live there could be a compatible cherry near enough that you will get fruit. Fortunately there are good resources out there to find good pollinators for stone fruit. Typically the male part of the flower will become active at a different part of time than the female part, to help eliminate self pollination, so variety X may be suitable ...


10

When you say 'recent', if that means within the last year, the only thing you need to do is keep it well watered during dry spells for its first 2-3 years. Hopefully you dug the soil over well and added organic composted materials prior to planting - if you didn't, you could mulch round the bottom of the tree with something like composted animal manure this ...


9

You won't find what you're looking for because that information doesn't exist. Planting of fruit trees is done according to how they're going to be trained and pruned, so, if you were growing trees cordon style, then you'd plant much closer together. If you're not intending to train or regularly prune your trees, then your guide to planting distance, one ...


8

Cherry seeds need both warm and cold stratification to overcome the seed's dormancy. But you can germinate fresh cherry seeds using the plant hormone Gibberellic acid. In March 1969, partially stratified (3 months) seed from 14 families were removed from cold storage, endocarps were removed by cracking, and 10 to 20 seeds from each family were ...


6

Yes, they do tend to point downwards, although if your weather is very warm and dry, it may need a couple of gallons twice a week for the first year. Looks pretty healthy to me, but keep up the watering - if it flowers this year, then remember to increase watering when/if fruit starts to form, particularly during dry spells. UPDATE: If it flowered, its ...


6

No can do, sorry. The trunk is called 'root stock' and it isn't the same as the grafted canopy. The canopy is actually a prostrate form of the cherry tree. It would grow flat on the ground if it had been left alone at the nursery. They select for the prostrate form to create lots of different kinds of 'weeping' trees. When young the prostrate form is ...


6

When you say its going to freeze, do you mean you're going to have a frost? I don't know what Zone you're in, but it seems unlikely you'll be going straight from cool to the ground freezing solid in a day. Physalis pruinosa is a frost sensitive plant, obviously, but if there's going to be frost tonight,do not pick your ground cherries - cover them with a ...


5

IIRC, anything from the "Prunus" family, which includes plums, apricots, peaches, nectarines, and almonds as well as cherries. My personal rootstock preference is for "Mazzard" but that may depend on your soil type. The link I revised the Mazzard mention to point to does note some specific cultivars having issues with specific rootstocks other than Mazzard,...


5

You really have 3 options: plant a second sweet cherry tree, graft a limb on your current cherry tree, or take your chances and hope one of your neighbors somewhere near by has a sweet cherry tree in their garden that will pollinate yours. Not knowing where you live, I have no idea how likely this third option is, but if many of your neighbors have fruit ...


5

Quick summary Improving growing conditions only contributes minimally to your cherry tree's fruit size Your neighbour's tree has a genetic advantage over your tree in terms of fruit size You can bud graft a branch from your neighbour's tree onto yours The best time to do this is from July 15 to August 15 Your own tree should have bark that slips easily The ...


5

My advice is to remove the tree, unless it were a small or dwarf form, which, if yours is already 30 feet, doesn't seem to be the case. Cherries, ornamental or otherwise, send out extensive surface roots which get pretty large, as well as having one or two major roots which go down a long way to keep the tree stable. Without knowing the variety of Prunus you ...


5

You should be able to save both the tree and the house foundation. Although 5 meters is a bit closer than desirable, the root hazard at least can be dealt with. The method below is high labor and can be expensive, but depending on the value of the tree to you, it's a possible solution. You will need to dig a trench between the house and the tree, close to ...


5

Fruits with pulp are made to be eaten: it is the purpose of such fruits: they help the plants to propagate. Cherries are made to be eaten by birds. So I think birds find a lot more cherries and other nice fruits around you. Or cats around you make them not to fly on your garden. Just wait, and when some bird will find your cherries mature, it will start ...


5

Looks like chocolate slime mold... Seriously... Also known as Stemonitopsis. It is normally feeding on dead trees, so I don't think it is causing your tree problems. If parts of your trees are dead (which they feed on) it has probably another cause.


4

Wait until they fall from the plant. You'll want to avoid eating them if they are unripe, because I have read on several forums now that they are toxic until they ripen,and contain solanine, the chemical that makes green potatoes poisonous. My husbands grandpa told him that, too.


4

General pruning rule is to not cut more than 1/3 of healthy foliage bearing wood on an established tree or shrub. That crotch is too close to the ground, two feet? So one of your competing leaders has got to go. That'll take you up to about a third, so leave the rest of the low level mess (2 etc) for next year.


4

Did you buy mini patio cherry trees? These are sold with a single stem, and often retain the single stem growth habit for the first 3 or 4 years, longer in pots. They will eventually branch a bit, but they do tend to remain fairly vertical in appearance - some care information here http://www.vanmeuwen.com/fruit-and-vegetables/fruit-trees/stone-fruit-trees/...


4

It seems a wild Prunus domestica (plum). "Wild" this time means probably grown by core of cultivated plums (or just few generation from such cultivated plum). I have several of this "wild" varieties, and one is very dark and branches and leaves redish. Unfortunately I never get ripe fruits. But to be sure, did you remember the flowers? I would expect ...


4

Yes, you can throw away the peach pits because they have mold. If the cherry pits are the same, throw them also. As for recommendations on how to optimize the process next time: PEACH The first thing to keep in mind is that early fruiting peach trees have immature embrios that will die before germinating. This is why you have to make sure you got the pit ...


4

Since you're concerned about the potential toxicity of the prunus padus to birds, I'll address that. The fruit from the tree is not only safe for birds, but is actually a healthy part of their diet. It supplies them with needed vitamins and nutrients. Sources generally agree that, even though they're edible, the seeds are undigestible for birds. Therefore, ...


4

I like Ecnerwal's suggestion to leave the cherry in place. A gift to the soil and the new tenant. If it must be moved, follow standard nursery practice and "ball it up" while still dormant. During the late winter months but before the buds swell, trim the top tips 1/3 of their length. Trench down along the former dripline about the radius of that circular ...


3

Because paint has the possible effect of interfering with gas exchanges through the bark, I wouldn't recommend doing it until the bark breaks, and roughens with age. I wouldn't expect much trouble though. You could also use trunk wraps. I would spray the oil on first, so that it will affect the fungus that will otherwise be covered by paint. If you wait ...


3

Ah good, reliably low winter temperatures. There's another way to do it - find a container you can punch holes in the top of and fill it with sand and peat, or just sand if that's all you've got (silver or horticultural sand, preferably), moisten if it needs it,you want it nice and damp but not sodden, mix in the cherry stones. You could use a plastic bag, ...


3

These are a natural part of many cherries and are called glands. There is a good picture here. No action is necessary on your part. See here for the same question.


3

You've had a LOT of rain in TN this year and cherries do not like wet feet. They also don't care much for the acid soil you also have, which the rain made much worse. If you want this tree to live, you have to get it out of that acid TN dirt and into some decent soil that isn't as acid and drains much better than TN clay. Start by purchasing some dirt. ...


3

It's cherry blackfly infestation - needs spraying before the leaf curl gets any worse. Westland Plant Rescue Fruit and Veg bugkiller should do it - you should also use Vitax Winter Tree wash during winter - this pest overwinters on the plant. As the leaves have started curling, its a little late for the Westland spray to be truly effective, but I'd use it ...


3

I planted a new cherry tree and it has these small red bumps either side of the stem joint. I have a myriad of insects feeding on them including native bees, flies, ants and ladybirds. At first I thought they were some kind of sap-sucking pest, but research says it's an amazing action by the tree itself to attract beneficial insects.


3

I thought you might be in the UK...first thing to say is your tree is planted much too close to the fence behind it, unless, that is, it's Prunus amanogowa, the flagpole cherry. Second, I suspect it has Cherry Leaf Spot (see here https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=567) especially if its shedding leaves early. Third, it appears to have been attacked or ...


3

Okay, I answered thinking you were talking about cherries from a tree, did not think right this morning. So I am completely redoing my answer. So... We grow our own ground cherries and I can say they WILL ripen if picked green. There will be some that fall on the ground and still be pretty green, with slight yellow. Just put them in a box and within 2 weeks ...


3

An interesting question which is perhaps better on biology.se than here. But here's my guess. Prunus padus has actually been used in herbal medicine for centuries, and although it does contain cyanide, it is in quite small amounts. The more cyanide it contains the fruit becomes more bitter making it unpalatable. The seed and leaves contain hydrogen ...


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