8

To answer your first question, I'm not sure what kind of chemicals store bought roses are usually treated with. Short answer: a lot. These flowers (especially when they're roses) don't really have much room for defects, so pesticides are applied heavily as a preventative, even when there are no symptoms of disease or pests on the plants. Most of these ...


8

Glyphosate is a blanket herbicide. It's not used in gardens. Weeds are controlled in gardens by proper tilling (very little), mulching (carbon for walkways, compost near plants), and pulling. No one with a lick of sense uses glyphosate anywhere near their roses. http://www.denverrosesociety.org/education/murder_by_roundup.pdf And the preparation for ...


6

No, not really. Fruit trees will drop fruit and if you don't want the fruit on the ground, you'll need to pick them up if you don't have animals that will eat them. Here on my farm the chickens would eat those up, assuming the deer didn't get to them first. Personally, I'd collect them and compost them - [crab]apples break down pretty well in the pile. ...


5

I'm gonna chance a sort of answer/query - I'm not certain it's viral because there is absolutely no evidence of mosaicing or yellow patching, even in the extra photos with higher resolution. What it smacks of to me is weedkiller damage, or at least chemical damage of some sort, but you say not all your plants are affected, so the big question is, were the ...


5

If you have sand for soil, unless you live in a desert, it's very possibly (but not definitely) acidic and poor in nutrients. Desert soils are often sandy and alkaline, with caliche underneath. Although Miracle Gro can add needed fertilizer and minerals, it should be noted that some nitrogen fertilizers may contribute to soil acidification (acidification can ...


4

I'll chip in my contribution here anyway, despite an answer being accepted, J. Chomel. Roundup is a big issue - I haven't used it for 8 years once I found out its worse than glyphosate on its own, because of the other additives contained within it making it, in theory, 'more effective' but also far more toxic. In the early days, Roundup was marketed as 'bio ...


4

Any good maintenance company either leaves a 'report' explaining any chemical treatments (organic or synthetic) for the homeowner or places flags with explanations as to treatment. If your company is not doing this it is entirely proper to ask them to do so, and retroactive as well! If you are using 'Organic' you should never see FAST changes. There are ...


4

No, I'm afraid not. Because plants vary in their requirements in terms of fertilising, it's more usual to start with the plant you want to feed and check what it requires in case it's anything particular (orchids, for instance, have specialist feeds available). At a very simplistic level, feeding also differs depending on the results you want - for instance, ...


4

I think I have it. That looks a lot like tomato yellow leaf curl virus. This can cause curling without yellowing (see matching pics). It is spread by adult silverleaf whiteflies, which makes sense in your case (enclosed). It also explains why only the tomatoes have been affected. Unfortunately there is no cure, so if the plants don't recover on their own (...


4

Yes bleach will harm or kill some plants - most plants it is just the leaves. I use a bleach/weed killer combo on poison ivy and it basically clears out everything in its path. If your plants get bleach on them the very best case scenario is you will notice spotting. Soap is perfectly fine around plants. Maybe there are some very sensitive plants that ...


4

Captan isn't going to hang around anyway, rain or shine: What happens to captan outdoors? The half-life of captan in soil ranges from less than 1 to 10 days (1, 9). See Half-life box. Captan’s half-life on plants ranges from 3 to 13 days (1). The half-life of captan is less than one day in water (1). Captan is stationary to slightly ...


4

For the Imidan, I've pulled up the label. Reading carefully, there is no mention of rain for it's use on fruit trees. For deciduous trees it mentions not to spray if the leaves won't be able to dry before the rain falls. While that does not appear to be required for your fruit tree application, I'd go ahead and make sure they have enough time to dry anyways ...


4

This does look like a virus. Probably Tobacco Mosaic Virus which is the most common for tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and tobacco. Do you smoke? Have you had any friends over that do? If tobacco users come near your plants, insist they wash their hands first. If your plants are in a greenhouse never allow any smoking in your greenhouse. I wouldn't allow ...


3

I have removed quite large berberis with just a shovel. They do not have a thick tap root system like junipers. If you trench around the plant and dig down you should be able to pop it out. A pair of secateurs or bypass pruner will help you cut any thick roots from the cedar. Backfill the hole with compost or topsoil to finish the job and water the area ...


3

I haven't tried it on barberry but round-up is typically a good candidate for targeting a specific individual. Apply it to the leaves, it kills the roots but breaks down quickly in the soil. So if you keep it off of neighboring plants as you apply, it won't harm them. Depending on the size of the plant and the density of the neighbors I will either spray or ...


3

Using blanket herbicides disturbs the billions of bacteria, fungi and other organisms in the soil, and although they might kill the weed in question, they deplete the soil of the biological diversity and resilience needed to fight other pests and infections. The same is seen when the human biome is disturbed by broad spectrum antibiotics, we can get ...


3

Whilst the Iron (II,III) oxide in pigments is usually manufactured, it does occur naturally as the mineral magnetite. It will gradually be converted into other iron compounds - exactly which will depend on soil chemistry/water availability, although it will tend to hydrate to form rust in healthy soils. These compounds will not cause you or your plants any ...


3

One "organic" option to provide iron is dried blood fertilizer, also called "blood meal". "Blood, fish, and bone" meal is also available. Of course the blood came from slaughtered food animals, and there is no guarantee that they were farmed "organically" - whatever that means! These products are also nitrogen-rich, and you need to take that into account ...


2

To get the iron without the nitrogen, you can use chelated iron. It's iron converted to a water soluble form for use in agriculture. Apparently seaweed fertilizer can also be high in iron.


2

I see a few problems right away: Fertilizers are known to displace natural nutrients in the soil use a polyculture seed mix as all the plants using the same nutrients in the soil, adding clover to your lawn will naturally add extra nitrogen purchase a bag of mycelium that is known to aid plant growth (I recommend wine caps as they're easy to identify and ...


2

I reuse those plastic buckets, large and small, with no problems in the garden. I do usually let them dry well and then peel off whatever will peel so I don't have unsightly paint chips throughout. Unscientific but factual.


2

The insect popularly called "a wasp" in the UK is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polistes_dominula. This is certainly not the same as the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellowjacket, the American popular name for various species of Vespula and Dolichovespula, which are more closely related to the hornet family than UK wasps. The "conventional" way to ...


2

I know of no way to enhance or strengthen the menthol content of a growing mint plant. Certainly, there are many varieties of mint available with differences in taste, some of which may be subtle differences, and it's said the taste is stronger just before flowering, and that the newer leaves have a stronger taste. I can't say I've noticed either of those ...


2

I use bleach to kill any algae or fungi on the floor of balcony. After using bleach, it becomes perfect at least for a couple of years. So imagine how it can kill anything. You have to think that Chlorine is the primary disinfectant for the house, the pool and all kinds of disease. The unic one for fungal diseases. It kills any organic cell. "It has the ...


1

I am with J Musser, chickens are the best way. With portable fencing you could corral them all day under the tree, which they will fertilize in return. A pig would work too, but since they are such destructive root hunters, most people bring the food to them. If you are thinking of picking them up, you might place a tarp under the tree just before the ...


1

I would like to suggest two answers: I have very similar leaf symptoms. I destroy all seedlings that: curl away from light. Show any abnormal color. Grow slower than the others! Have veins that are not normal. Have new leaf shapes. This is how I've been able to continue after TMV, and Beet leaf curl virus. But it's an ...


1

This is without a doubt a herbicidal injury. I live in rice country and get FACET drift (A herbicide sprayed for weed control on rice fields) every year (along with everyone in the area) on our garden tomatoes. The first lower tomato settings will ripen while the rest of the above plant will barely thrive. The next bloom set will put on tomatoes but in very, ...


1

This is a herbicidal enjury or herbicidal toxicity on tomato plant. I have seen many tomato fields in Kanpur district in the state of Uttar Pradesh (INDIA), where 2,4-D herbicide apply in very low concentration on tomato crop for increasing fruit set. In that fields tomato crop appear same as above tomato imaze. Dr. Brajesh Patel


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