9

Maybe we should rethink the way we garden! I, too cut the main head off that was huge on my fall cauliflower. But it had been planted next to a new fruit tree and I did not want to disturb the roots so I left it there thinking that it would decompose on its own. In the spring it produced 4 side shoots - each producing a very full head. I cut those off ...


7

My dog figured out that cauliflower is delicious. Two plants survived with just a nub of the flower intact. They have regrown and I now have two more heads! They are not as tightly packed as the first ones were. I have also cut off some of the leaves and eaten them as well. I am going to cut off the majority of the head and see if it will do it again.


5

I have cut my Lime colored heads mid summer. It's now mid September and both regrew bigger than first head. No lie. Didn't pull in first place because too big, and then I just wanted to see what would happen. Nice surprise. Totally rethinking cauliflower in next year's garden. I am in zone 5-6, mountainish area in Oregon. Dry summer, crazy wet fall.


4

Like cabbage's family plants, cauliflower has a growth phase followed by a flowering phase. It usually takes two seasons, with a winter in the middle. It looks like this plant is on its second growth season. So my guess is it got great stress ( drought or freeze) and started producing flowers too soon. It also could be one you planted the year before or ...


4

Other than preventing cabbage worms (see other answer), I'd focus on conditions. Cauliflower and broccoli both love nitrogen, more than is present in your average topsoil. They love freshly composted manure mixed into the soil they're growing in, but if that is not available, you can use a leaf vegetable/corn fertilizer at the three leaf stage, and then ...


4

Cauliflowers take on many different colors so I don't think it's an issue. They often look purple due to the production of anthocyanins. If you want white, you need to cover the flower to protect against sunlight to blanch them. Many people tie the leaves together, or, if you plant closely the leaves are forced close by crowding.


3

It looks as though it's been ravaged by insects. Are you sure you don't have cabbage worms, aphids etc attacking this plant. Sometimes I see that the weakest plant in a group of plants gets attacked by insects leaving the more healthy ones alone. That is it becomes the honey pot limiting damage to the other plants.


3

Cauliflower needs uninterrupted growth because interruptions can cause the plants to develop a head prematurely. Usually the flowers stay small and open up in summer, when the night temperature doesn't drop significantly from the day temperature. However, from your profile I see you are in hardiness zone 10 in Northern hemisphere, so no way to have hot ...


3

I picked my cauliflower and cabbage several weeks ago but left two of the plants in to see what would happen. They both have a lot of new growth on them, so I'm leaving them. One has at least six new shoots.


3

Unlike some of the responses, I have experienced secondary growth after harvesting the main Cauliflower head. So, I would suggest keeping the plant and giving it a change, assuming you don't have any other use of that space i.e. you are not ready to plant something else.


3

In my personal experience, the most important thing is to get row cover or some other insect barrier over them before you are visited by the white cabbage butterfly, which maketh cabbage worms. Since these are vegetative rather than fruiting plants, you don't need to let bees in, and you will be well served keeping the butterflies out. I had never grown ...


2

More more leaves left alone, the faster the plant will mature. Why don't you use cabbage or broccoli to juice rather than cauliflower leaves?


1

Looks like Tagetes (Marigold), did you have those last year by any chance?


1

Do I have news for you! I live in Phoenix too. Planted 6 cauliflower bedding plants in mid Nov last year (2020). First time ever I have tried to grow it. They started to form little white heads in early Feb and promptly grew tall, with sprangly green stems and tiny yellow florets (I believe they tried to bolt, we had a rash of 70+ degree days). After some ...


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