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9

I can think of a couple of possible issues that could cause otherwise healthy carrots to not grow well or to appear not to be growing well. One, carrots prefer cooler temperatures for maximum growth. Not cold, but cooler as it is in the spring and early fall. If it is hot where you are right now, they may simply be "on pause" while they wait for better ...


7

I grow carrots and I don't believe roots branching off has anything to do with manure.i use kelp for manure. I sift my soil and mix it with sand and I have perfect 16 to 18in carrots every time with no roots branching off. Prior to doing this I didn't sift my soil or mix with sand and my carrots had branches everywhere. I think the branches on carrots are ...


7

Chop the carrots up, just to make sure. They're most likely holes left by larvae of the carrot fly, and they may long have left and turned into flies. Even if you do inadvertently cook one in the soup, consider it an extra bit of protein, it won't harm you, although if you're vegetarian, you might want to slice them quite finely to make sure.


6

It depends when you want them. They should last until winter in the ground without bolting. Carrots are normally biennial, and will bolt during season 2. You can harvest them at any time while growing, and can leave them until a hard freeze. They take frost, but not a hard freeze. There is another thing you can try: Put haybales end to end down both sides of ...


6

Carrots are shade tolerant so I wouldn't remove the potato leaves. Any leaf reduction will reduce the amount of carbohydrates being stored in the tubers. If they're early season potatoes, you may well have harvested them all before the carrots are mature.


5

The outside is just fine. Supermarkets and the farms that feed them throw away carrots that aren't "perfect", giving the myth that there is exactitude to the shape of the carrots The inside is a different story. Does it taste woody or too tender? It appears that the carrot is either too ripe or too tender. You have to check your zone and also try to ...


5

When you are going to eat them. Mulch heavily over the row when frost comes to keep the ground from freezing too much, and dig as needed through the winter. Tastiest and best storage. If you have a root cellar (not a modern heated basement) your second-best storage option (or best if you have problems with them being eaten in place in the garden) is in a ...


5

Fresh manure also can transfer E. Coli to garden vegetables, so you should always make sure your manure is well composted, for around 3-4 months. If it's still smells very strongly, it's probably too fresh.


4

Any chance slugs ate them ? What you can try is plant some of the seeds you got in for example clumps of 4 in the module trays and then transplant outside when they are big enough this is the safest bet to avoid slugs and you will confirm at the same time if problem is not with the seeds you bought.


4

Your carrots do have a severe aphid infestation. Often you can blast them off with a strong jet of water, but the ants will lift them back up again if they're harvesting the aphid dew. So, you're left with any of the insecticidal mixes that deal with aphids including insecticidal soaps, neem oil etc, as well as biocontrol with parasitic wasps and ladybugs. ...


4

Allelopathy is the ability of a plant to release substances which may inhibit the growth or germination of other plant species. I don't know specifically about the the interaction with dill and carrots but it is possible.


4

After some more research, I believe they are Ebony bugs (thyreocoridea), which some people once called Negro bugs. They have the white lateral stripe which helps identify them, and are known for eating flowers in the carrot family turning to seed like the ones I found. Hope they cause minimal damage.


4

I don't know a lot about carrots, but I'm guessing they need more potassium (if you're deficient in calcium or silica that may also be an issue). Those three things really strengthen stems of plants: I imagine they do similar things to roots. If you like soft carrots, I wouldn't worry about it much, though. Potassium and phosphorus are said to play a role in ...


4

Soft and spongy might actually be a symptom of carrots that are low on water. Water within plant cells provides pressure to support the cell walls. As cells lose water, this support weakens, and can cause cell walls to sag. This can give the "soft and spongy" sort of texture you describe when you eat it. Carrots can re-hydrate somewhat if placed in water for ...


3

So it turns out that I probably had a bad batch of seeds. After replanting from a new seed packet, under essentially the same conditions, I have some thriving carrots!


3

It is a very generic question, so it is difficult to fully answer it. The rules are: try to avoid growing the same family of vegetable in the same place: This mean, when you finished with one vegetable, try to alternate the family. This will reduce diseases, and on large gardens, also stress of ground: one family tend to absorb the same kind of nutrients. ...


3

You have transplant shock on the one hand, and you have some very "bunch of twigs and rocks" looking "soil" on the other hand. Much of transplant shock is from loss of roots (inevitable) in transplanting, and as a result you do need to make sure they are not water-stressed at all for a while, without making the soil soggy. Occasional misting of the tops may ...


2

Here you go; try this article. The best way to deal with any of these problems is always know thy enemy. Pesticides usually do far more harm than are helpful. See if this article helps you with these guys. There IS a BT for beetles SOMEWHERE. I've no idea why they've not produced this stuff. It is a toxin made by a bacterium call Bacillus thuringiensis ...


2

Don't pile soil around carrots, higher than the crown. Weak stems is an indicator of too fast of growth/too little light. If the stems seem stretched/pale, increase the light. If they are big and healthy, but soft and weak, it might be a fertilizing issue. Both of these things will keep the plants from forming good roots. Also, some carrots I've grown did ...


2

after how many harvests would I need to start fertilizing? With the same idea as crop rotation, you probably shouldn't be growing carrots in the same soil year after year. I'd say after a couple years, bringing in fresh mix is a much better option. I know I have enough room for them but am more worried about whether there will be enough nutrition in the ...


2

Leads to forking of the tap roots (which are the carrots) Leads to high vegetative growth leading to small tap roots (carrots)


2

Well Depending on which type of peppers you have started, I can say hotter varieties will partially cross with tomatoes or make cucumbers somewhat hot. Though Ive never had this happen to me, Ive heard about it many times. I wouldn't worry about what you have planted too much, all though you did say you have melons growing. Melons stretch a long distance ...


2

If you plant potatoes with the recommended spacing along the rows and between the rows, you can expect them to make a complete leaf canopy that shades out everything. This shade is a good thing, because the shade stops annual weeds from germinating, so you don't need to do any cultivation between earthing up (hilling) the potatoes and harvesting them. If ...


1

I have experienced similar problems before as well. I now use a seeding mix when I plan seeds directly in the ground. That seems to be working for me since this year I got both carrot and beet seeds to sprout from the ground.


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