12

You could try seaweed which has been used as a soil additive. Just chop it up and wash it with freshwater or compost it before using. Depending on where you are you should find varieties of palm trees. The fibre found between the hard outer shell and the inner nut is also used as a soil additive. Animal manure from goats, pigs, sheep or chickens is also ...


8

What you need is a fast growing, fast spreading ground cover which is suitable to your environment. A suitable ground cover has the following benefits: Lock in moisture and nutrients at ground level Provide habitat for beneficial insects (think moist and decomposing versus hot dry and sandy, bugs are going to prefer to stay underground if there is little ...


7

I haven't ever worried about it. Here are my general guidelines YES best to chop up or dry out fresh veggies, because many will just start growing and never get eaten. add ground up egg shells, they provide calcium and a buffer against organic acid buildup. make sure you have plenty of air, and not too much water, drain holes in the bottom are a must. ...


5

If possible, use raised beds, or lined beds, in part to keep the alkalinity out. Composted medium, if there are lots of coconut trees; find dead thoroughly rotted ones that can be added to the mix. Compost is everything; with this method you may need to lower the pH as the pH is a little higher with composted material. In the atolls I have made gardens ...


4

The composting process works best when the C:N ratio is about 30:1. So you will want to add N to reach that ratio. If a 20kg bale is 45% C and 0.5% N (section 4), there's about 8.25kg C and 0.09 kg N or about 90:1 C:N. If you add 0.25 kg N you'll be around the 30:1 ratio. Now, that 30:1 is ideal for composting, but there won't be anything left over for ...


4

The way to improve sandy soil is to add clay. You can substitute organics and make it work for a time, but you're always going to be adding organics and struggling to keep up with the constant decay. Compost and pretty much anything plant-like is mostly cellulose (C6 H10 O5), which decays to CO2 and H2O. What few minerals that are contained in plant-life ...


3

The idea behind the straw bale technique is to take a predominantly carbon source, add nitrogen to parts of it to create compost, and to grow plants which are going to use the compost/humus while it is being created. The nitrogen provides the energy for composting bacteria to convert the straw to humus thereby freeing up the nutrients in the straw so that ...


3

I stumbled upon this scientific paper in which they say that different earthworm species are impacted differently by C-to-N ratio and feed mixture type. For the Eisenia fetida (tiger worm) the result of their study was: A C-to-N ratio of 25 resulted in the highest stability of the product, the best fertilizer-value of the product, and also a ...


3

Normally, atoll sandy sand is seriously deficiency in 3 mineral, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn). These 3 mineral is the most wanted. Chemical fertilizer is the best way, buy these 3 mineral and use as foliar fertilizer.


3

This isn't the easiest process in the world, but you can do it. Personally, I'd call up a lab and ask if they could test it for me. Other than that, you would have to use something like a combustion process, like a CHN analyzer such as this one (expensive), or use a mass spectrometer to ionize and separate the material, like this one (even more expensive). ...


2

Just a small thought to add, most sands on tropical atolls are derived from coral, as such the last thing the sand needs for plant to grow in it is more alkaline material. I find a mix of sand with compost 50x50 and used in containers will grow tomatoes,eggplant, and peppers with the help of some magnesium sulphate and seaweed tea. .


1

Be safe. Use the used litter only to fill holes; that's about it. There are a lot of bloggers who demonstrate you CAN compost cat litter (wood and clay), growing even leafy ground crops like lettuce. But they have not tested their cats or their worked soil. My property is a little wild, and I've spent a few years leveling out some of the larger dips and ...


1

I have areas in my garden that are shaded where I have dug trenches 18 inches deep. I have put the cat litter in the trench, and then covered with soil. Because the area is shaded, it is unlikely to be used later by any subsequent owner for vegetable production. Also, the pathogens are unlikely to persist after two years.


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