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10

I would not eat them, just because there is very little left. I would have no problem eating leaves with little damage. These are just eaten (by expert), so they are good, and they don't leave traces (and poo), no more than usual insects which are not eating the leaves. In any case you will clean them with water, and then cook them. So there is really no ...


10

All of the cabbage leaves are edible, and they won't taste like bugs. Leaves with holes might not be appealing to dinner guests, but no harm or bad taste will come to you and your family eating them. Just give them a good rinse before you prepare to make sure any insects or insect remnants are washed off. I'm not sure what organism ate your plants but check ...


6

Looks like a snail or a slug to me... caterpillars are also a common cabbage pest, but they usually start at the edges.


5

Fungus is just part of a healthy ecosystem. I think it should be fine, but you can pull them if you choose. They live on decaying material in the soil. The bugs can be anything. I would think slugs still, but it could be grasshoppers. You didn't mention where you were located or the climate right now. I had the same problem with cabbage a few years ...


5

The cabbage worms will definitely find your cabbages. I don't know whether they do it using smell or sight but they will find it. That is the reason to put row cover on the brassicas to avoid any further damage. Before you put the row cover, go through the plants to make sure you have removed all the cabbage worms that are already there.


5

This sounds completely normal for cabbage or any brassica for that matter. As the head enlarges, the leaves surrounding it expand - kinda magic! Not saying your plant couldn't be dead, but the enclosing leaves (bracts, actually) are a good sign, not a bad one. Just the same, look for what look like lots of spider webs or tiny moving bodies, as major ...


4

Floating row cloth is absolutely necessary to have around as there are many uses for this stuff. But the Brassica family of cabbage, kale, broccoli etc. Really need to be covered as soon as they've been planted primarily for the cabbage fly whose larva eat the roots. That wasn't what ate your leaves. Possibly flea beetle. Those leaves are important so ...


4

It looks like you have cabbage worms. This is a common problem with brassicas and the symptoms are clear. You should check under the leaves and you will most likely see green worms camouflaged with the leaves. Sometimes they are hard to spot but based on the damage I suspect the works are a good inch in length. Not much you can do not but to prevent ...


3

Male worms can get to your cabbages by looking for visual cues (green color). And remember: The upper side of the male is creamy white.


3

Yes, they will still be a problem - cabbage worms (or larvae of the cabbage white butterfly, which is what they are) like any member of the cabbage family or brassicas in general, and your chinese cabbage is a member of that family. If you have room, try planting cabbages elsewhere in the garden and grow something else in the space usually allotted to them....


3

Both slugs and worms like well rotted composts, particularly if its damp - the only thing you can do is to reduce their activity so they can't so easily get inside your cabbages. You can try covering the compost with boards or even anchored down weed control fabric to keep the worms in the soil and off the cabbage. There are other methods described in the ...


3

Yes ,but pick off the caterpillars first. ( Green ,cabbage butterfly caterpillars). My friend argues that the caterpillars are full of cabbage so should be good to eat but I don't recommend that. You can control the caterpillars with BT ( bacillus thurengensis ?).


2

These caterpillars don't move during the day - they're still and sleeping and come out at night to do their feeding. Come sun up they align themselves with the midrib of the leaf and they don't move until it's dark again. Hard to spot - but they're there.


2

Cabbage white caterpillars the top right hand side of the photo gave it away with the white fibres being left behind, you should not only easily find them- quite big but they poo little green droppings at the bases of the leaves. pick them off- no need for any fancy chemicals- way too expensive and poisoning one self is not a good idea when coming to vege. ...


2

According to this tour guide, "Anbandegi The most beautiful cabbage patch made by hands.", the cabbage field is located above 1100 m on the mountainside. They seem to have an answer to the other part of your question as well: After the Korean War, the people had come into the deep mountains, planted fields, and built a place to survive. The area ...


2

Cabbage loopers , green caterpillars , the adults are white butterflys. BT ( bacillus thurengensis) is the main control today. Some time ago I used malathion spray or sevin dust ,but they are politically incorrect today.


1

Yes, it has the visual characteristics of a red type of cabbage. There are at least two reasons for not having a head appear: poor soil and genetics that confine its development to an ornamental type. If the soil is poor or too alkaline then it will produce a few small leaves and do nothing about a head. There are ornamental varieties which are designed not ...


1

Looks like some other cole ,like kohlrabi ;it is difficult to identify from photo.


1

Earwigs do most of their damage at night. What's at question is whether the soil you've used contained earwig eggs which have now hatched, since you didn't use sterilized potting medium, so you may find more arriving. Earwigs eat mostly insects, though they do also like to nibble on flower petals quite frequently, and occasionally on plants, and I'm not ...


1

I encountered a very similar issue with my Kale plants. Look under the leaves (sometimes on the front side as well) to look for green worms. Cabbage worms are attracted to brassicas and from the damage to the kale, it looks like cabbage worms. I hand picked them out of the kale while they were young to limit the damage. If you see any eggs as well, you ...


1

This is a healthy, productive plant. A few holes, tears or lost leaves won't ruin a plant's vigor. The inside holes are probably slugs, snails or flea beetles. The edges are probably being munched on by rodents, slugs. Plants are built to be rugged, hardy. If the damage begins to increase, you'll have figured out what to expect and you'll be on top of ...


1

I had it few times, bought in a nursery, and they were exactament so. the guy explained that part of these were behind a pole of the greenhouse so got less sun. Then I have grown from seed, it was impossible to put them all in the same position and the result was the same. But in fact, places to stay, they have grown regularly, beautiful and healthy.


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