8

Yes, that crop is finished. Broccoli doesn't regrow well from an early bolt. It's still edible (if you like the buds that size), so you could still salvage some, but It'd be best to take the plants out now and plant something else. Not another brassica, though, it's good to rotate between vegetable families, to prevent possible pest/disease buildup. This ...


6

looks like lambs quarter in the pot and some sort of brassica in the ground... if you planted broccoli, then that is it...


5

Ladybugs like to eat two things - some insects and pollen, so if you can plant around and about with plants that they'll like, that should help to not only attract them, but keep them around, so long as you've got something in flower for them. Not sure what the temperatures are like where you are, but in the UK, finding things ladybugs like that are in ...


5

Fungus is just part of a healthy ecosystem. I think it should be fine, but you can pull them if you choose. They live on decaying material in the soil. The bugs can be anything. I would think slugs still, but it could be grasshoppers. You didn't mention where you were located or the climate right now. I had the same problem with cabbage a few years ...


5

The "cabbage worm" which is really a caterpillar of the cabbage moth is best prevented by preventing the moth from accessing the plant - hoops of floating row cover are commonly deployed over cabbage-family plants (such as broccoli and kale) to provide this protection. Once they are present, the most common "generally considered environmentally safe" ...


5

This has worked for me for 20+ years, just like tomatoes. And of course, don't over water to avoid root rot.


4

I'm unsure about the plant in the pot, but the one in the bed definetely is a cabbage. There are a few cabbages that look remarkably similar at this stage, kohlrabi, for example. Based on what you write, this is your broccoli. The mysterious seedling is not tatsoi, because this has rounded leaves right from the start. Italian chicory is out, too, because ...


4

Other than preventing cabbage worms (see other answer), I'd focus on conditions. Cauliflower and broccoli both love nitrogen, more than is present in your average topsoil. They love freshly composted manure mixed into the soil they're growing in, but if that is not available, you can use a leaf vegetable/corn fertilizer at the three leaf stage, and then ...


4

Cut the floret bunch off as soon as it looks big enough. Don't wait too long as it gets pithy. Broccoli and cauliflower are very tasty young and smallish. If you harvest sooner they might be able to start a new head. Smaller is tastier...


4

What you have here are seed pods - your broccoli has started to go to seed. The plant is approaching the end of its lifecycle, when it developes seeds for a new generation and dies. The leaves are no longer needed for photosynthesis and the plant discards them. The process can be sped up if the environmental conditions are “difficult” and the plant decides ...


4

That leaf is the oldest leaf and is in the process of dying. Totally normal. Cut it off so that plant can concentrate its energy making its flower!


4

Don't want to disuade you from trying but when a problematic bug explodes in number, they will never be quickly eradicated with a predator bug. Better to attend to conditions that caused the aphid outbreak. Without plentiful other sources of food for ladybugs and other conditions, they don't hang around. In any case, they will not effectively clean up aphids ...


3

You need to get them before they start to unbunch like the second picture as it's going into flower. The reasons you aren't getting large flowers are many, but probably not enough nutrients, or water in the ground. And since they're a cool season vegetable they tend to bolt like this in the heat. You don't say where you are and it depends on location on ...


3

As noted, you found your answer on the net; too little light and too warm. When I started seeds with some success . It was in a garage at roughly 60F. I used 2 -40 watt growlux and 3- 100 watt incandescents mounted in the fluorescent hoods. The light fixture height was adjusted to a couple inches above the plant- yes some leaves burned. 100 watts were used ...


3

In my personal experience, the most important thing is to get row cover or some other insect barrier over them before you are visited by the white cabbage butterfly, which maketh cabbage worms. Since these are vegetative rather than fruiting plants, you don't need to let bees in, and you will be well served keeping the butterflies out. I had never grown ...


2

Skeletonized leaves are more likely to be caused by slugs and snails or other pests rather than birds - birds tend to go for the florets or flowering heads rather than leaves. Cropping from sprouting broccoli is usually over a 4-6 week period, so it may be their time is up, but you could try giving them liquid fertiliser to see if that gives them a boost. ...


2

Aphids like many insects go for the weakest plant they can see. So, if you have a raised bed of differing plants, you'll find that the aphids will target the weak plants and leave the strongest alone. So, in my mixed raised of bed of cauliflowers, and broccoli, the broccoli are untouched but the cauliflowers are infested with aphids and cabbage worms ( I ...


2

Broccoli like any brassica is very hardy- so not much warmth is needed- about 10 to 15c and lots of light when they emerge, place next to a window still and turn them 180 every day- I wouldn't keep them indoors for no more than 5 days and start to harden off to go outside straight away, the jiffy pots you've got them in will show you when to plant up or pop ...


2

Plant them out when they are smaller. They fall over because the transplanted roots can't find enough water to keep the plant stem rigid. Watering the plants doesn't completely solve this, because the root hairs need time to grow into close contact with the soil particles. If you transplant them when they only have four leaves, first the bottom leaves are ...


2

Yeah, these broccoli plants are 'bolting'. What fertilizer did you use? This is found when too much nitrogen is added, lots of vegetative growth and the reproductive growth bolts. OR, when there are a few too many days of drastic temperature changes, up or down, that will cause this 'bolting'. The most common problem is too much nitrogen in relation to ...


1

Mostly patience is helpful in these situations. The weather has been a bit cooler than normal in N. America this spring so your beans and onions may be just reacting to that. hings are about to change for the warmer, so keep an eye on them and if they continue to perform poorly then sacrifice a couple of plants of each to examine the roots - if something is ...


1

This is definitely too little light. Are you indoors? A greenhouse? No they aren't ready to be transplanted. If they are indoors by a window that is just not enough for light. You need to get a real grow light to start plants indoors. Those seedlings will strengthen if you get a real grow light. We've got lots of info on lighting on our site. That ...


1

I encountered a very similar issue with my Kale plants. Look under the leaves (sometimes on the front side as well) to look for green worms. Cabbage worms are attracted to brassicas and from the damage to the kale, it looks like cabbage worms. I hand picked them out of the kale while they were young to limit the damage. If you see any eggs as well, you ...


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