7

I'd concur that its a brassica of some sort, present from the birds I expect.


6

I guess you can do it as for other varieties? http://seedworld.com/cross-pollination-8/ Cover the flower heads. This technique (also known as "bagging") will need to be done before the flowers open so that bees and any other pollen transporting insects are preventing from getting to them. For covering the flowers only, try such items as: Toilet ...


5

This looks very much like romanescu, it's normally green but there seem to be pictures of purple ones on Google. As far as going to seed; the head on cauliflower or broccoli is a flower, so they don't go to seed in the same sense as a plant grown for leaf or root veg. However they can be fussy plants and environmental conditions can affect the way the head ...


5

This has worked for me for 20+ years, just like tomatoes. And of course, don't over water to avoid root rot.


4

They do not help at all. The presence of another butterfly will often attract these, and you will often see numbers of them visiting the same plants. Even when finding a spot to lay eggs. They avoid a spot that has another butterfly on it (because of caterpillar food competition), but it really doesn't stop them from taking advantage of the plants. My ...


4

Like cabbage's family plants, cauliflower has a growth phase followed by a flowering phase. It usually takes two seasons, with a winter in the middle. It looks like this plant is on its second growth season. So my guess is it got great stress ( drought or freeze) and started producing flowers too soon. It also could be one you planted the year before or ...


4

Where I am the cabbage moth was active the whole summer until mid autumn. In fact people said it was such a good summer that we had several generations of cabbage moths this year. I tried row covers over hoops but found the following issues. I couldn't easily inspect the plants so missed seeing insect damage Moths still managed to get in possibly because ...


4

Cut the floret bunch off as soon as it looks big enough. Don't wait too long as it gets pithy. Broccoli and cauliflower are very tasty young and smallish. If you harvest sooner they might be able to start a new head. Smaller is tastier...


4

Cover the plants with lightweight fabric or row covers, and hand pollinate them yourself. It's a lot of work, and keep in mind that brassicas are biennial so you'll have to wait until year 2 to get flowers and seeds. Also be forewarned that most of the brassicas are really large and ugly when they set seeds. I did this with kale one year and I won't do it ...


4

What you have here are seed pods - your broccoli has started to go to seed. The plant is approaching the end of its lifecycle, when it developes seeds for a new generation and dies. The leaves are no longer needed for photosynthesis and the plant discards them. The process can be sped up if the environmental conditions are “difficult” and the plant decides ...


3

cabbage worm and control Cabbage worm I've seen these little dudes often. They can damage quite a bit...see the white moths, their parents? Very common. This is the first article I've found that give 'yellow jackets' or wasps a bit of credit. They love these yummy little caterpillars. Bt is another perfect 'pesticide to spray but please do it at night ...


3

The single species Brassica oleracea contains a huge range of different forms grown as food crops, including cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, kale, kohlrabi, etc. The ones in your picture are usually called "ornamental cabbage" or "flowering kale." There are many different varieties available with flower colours from purple to white. They ...


3

It looks as though it's been ravaged by insects. Are you sure you don't have cabbage worms, aphids etc attacking this plant. Sometimes I see that the weakest plant in a group of plants gets attacked by insects leaving the more healthy ones alone. That is it becomes the honey pot limiting damage to the other plants.


3

Cauliflower needs uninterrupted growth because interruptions can cause the plants to develop a head prematurely. Usually the flowers stay small and open up in summer, when the night temperature doesn't drop significantly from the day temperature. However, from your profile I see you are in hardiness zone 10 in Northern hemisphere, so no way to have hot ...


3

It looks to me like an Amaranthaceae, maybe a Betta sp. (vulgaris, etc...).


3

On the depth of the beds, that is very shallow. Fortunately, you can add compost as the plants grow, hilling it up around the stems. The plants will grow roots into the new compost, building plant strength. Because that is a possibility, I'd recommend it over replanting the starts, as that will set them back a bit. What looks like a bigger issue is the ...


2

To answer the question, yes, the white butterfly does repeatedly lay eggs even on infested plants, selecting those leaves with the highest nitrogen content which are the growing parts of your brassicas. Even if you remove all the caterpillars you see, you'll miss some. I can remove all from my large Brussels sprout to find large caterpillars the following ...


2

Read the seed packets, they usually tell you length of time to harvest. Like 60-75 days, or something similar. Plan accordingly to when you want to harvest. I garden by planting new seeds every two weeks so something is always ready to pick. In the height of summer a lot of things won't grow well unless you are prepared to eat them as baby crops. Lots of ...


2

This link https://www.plantvillage.org/en/topics/brussels-sprouts discusses the problems seen with Brussels sprouts. Small buds can result from boron deficiency, and black/brown leaves from fungal disease such as alternaria leaf spot. The plants also need 6 hours of sunshine ( mine are mostly shaded in winter), and plenty of organic matter due to reduced ...


2

They look like Moth eggs to me, and the larvae that turn into moths could be responsible for that damage. (Moth larvae:Moth::Caterpillar:Butterfly) It's possible they're slug eggs. It's uncommon but not rare for snails to lay eggs on vegetation. http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/slug-snail-eggs.htm I'm going with moth, because ...


2

These are possibly flea beetles. They enjoy warm dry weather and particularly like brassica crops of which of course arugula is a member. So one way to reduce the attacks is to sow as early as possible during cool and wetter conditions. One thing to try is to sow radishes to try to attract them away from the arugula, they might just like the disposable crop ...


2

Looks like romanescu, a broccoli.


2

Turns out this is related to some excessive and abnormal heat wave we had for a few days. The plant seems to have recovered, except for the few leaves that got hit with the excessive heat. In hindsight I should have increased the water frequency or times during the heat wave.


2

Plant them out when they are smaller. They fall over because the transplanted roots can't find enough water to keep the plant stem rigid. Watering the plants doesn't completely solve this, because the root hairs need time to grow into close contact with the soil particles. If you transplant them when they only have four leaves, first the bottom leaves are ...


1

This is bacterial soft rot I have this same problem in my cabbage and and collards. Temperatures are very hot and humid which is ideal for this problem. The rot stinks terribly. https://gardener.fandom.com/wiki/Bacterial_soft_rot


1

This is likely to be a disease called club root which affects many plants in the Brassicaea family caused by Plasmodiaphora brassicae. You will likely get stunted growth above ground and root distortion under ground. There are no control for this disease. It is not dangerous to human consumption. However, the more brassicas you grow, the more disease you ...


1

Too hot broccoli is a cold weather crop.


1

I'm far from expert on the subject, but covering when you set them out is advisable; the white cabbage moths are active in cooler weather, and I'm certain I saw the little beasts the very day transplanted my first cabbages out (into wall-o-waters once I refreshed my information enough to realize that they only take freezing well when mature, not as seedlings....


1

Pac choi is a different species from cabbage so they will not cross. Cabbage, some kales, cauliflowers, brussels sprouts, and broccoli are the same species and will cross. Brassica seed lasts many years when stored properly so grow one variety a year for seed. You do not need to grow every variety for seed every year.


1

Bok choy is a cool season crop and bolting is triggered by lengthening photoperiods ( daylight hours exceeding 16 hours, or darkness less than 8 hours for a month ), and temperatures below 55 deg F ( 12 Deg C ). Once bolting has been triggered, the plant can not return to the vegetative stage. Short days with warm temperatures will prolong the vegetative ...


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