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5

It's one of the Hawk Moths, and I think its the larvae of the Death's Head Hawk Moth, Acherontia atropos. The markings on its back start out distinctly blue, but turn to greyish silver over time, as it gets bigger. It has this little appendage that you can see in the picture, not unusual for hawk moth larvae http://mentalfloss.com/article/57940/12-facts-...


5

Well, there are some things you can do that are "Organic," and safe for the environment. #1 you are already doing. Handpick caterpillars from plants as you find them. You may need to patrol your garden at night to find slugs and some caterpillars. Relocate the caterpillars to a different area, or kill them by dropping them into a bucket of soapy water. Or ...


4

After Bamboo's answer I checked again and collected around 20 caterpillars just on one plant (50x50cm) and I'm sure I missed some of them. I checked again for the alert I received from a fellow gardener of the village last year, and it is exactly what I found on mine: Pyrales du buis: Cydalima perspectalis, the box tree moth. I will try the treatment based ...


4

If there's webbing amongst the leaves, my money's on box tree caterpillar, although its odd you've not actually noticed the caterpillars themselves yet. Of all the problems Box gets (and its an ever increasing list) the only one that goes with webbing is the caterpillar. The caterpillar is the larval stage of a moth and was first found in mainland Europe in ...


4

It's one of two things. Either it's drowned or it could be box blight. Cylindrocladium blight, Pseudonectria rousseliana, is very nasty. It's best to destroy and not replant. It's possible that the plants were mistreated before you bought them, or possibly when the plants were transplanted did you damage the roots too? I still stand by my second idea-box ...


4

I didn't prune my boxwoods at all due to the harsh winter we had. I wanted to give them a chance to recover first, but I wanted to deal with miners as well. I got them at the perfect time I think. I used a solution of Dawn soap and water and soaked the snot out of them. The miners were flying like crazy and a coating of dead bodies and soap bubbles were ...


3

Rather depends what you mean by Japanese box hedge - as far as I'm concerned, it means varieties of Buxus microphylla (as opposed to Buxus sempervirens). Although the varieties differ a little in height and spread, the general rule for planting as a hedge is aroiund 10 cm apart. The link below is to the RHS,where they talk about a much closer planting ...


3

Boxwood are "pinched" or thinned in the summer, and sheared in the winter. If you shear them in the spring, all the beautiful new growth will be removed, leaving last year's old growth. Once you see the buds in Spring it's too late to shear, unless you really must. Thinning is very important. Rather than repeat it all here, I'll just reference a really ...


3

The link you've given does indeed suggest a possible, very mature and eventual height of up to 6 feet. However, every other source on the net says 2-4 feet high and wide, so the odds are with the smaller height. This plant is a cross between B. smpervirens and B. microphylla koreana, and the latter is a dwarf version of Buxus (Box) - it is a relatively slow ...


3

I suspect it's root rot. It's a fungus-like organism that feeds on unhealthy roots and grows to feed on healthy roots. Likely due to soil being too packed and too wet for too long. Fix: Amend the soil for aeration/drainage (I prefer diatomaceous earth (#8822 oil absorber from Napa). Let the soil dry to 1/2" down between watering. More time-consuming but ...


3

Also, bear in mind that pruning depends on how badly your plants are infested. You could easily snip off a leaf or two, but when it's your entire plant you definitely need to take other pest control measures. Neem oil is very effective in combating that problem. You can also try introducing predatory insects as these feed on the larvae when they're injected ...


3

You can control them when the adults fly (occurs in early spring, the exact time is variable to location), which happens for about 2 weeks. The large, overwintered worms emerge as tiny flies (sometimes mistaken for gnats) which will fly about, landing all over the boxwood plants. There are a ton of effective chemicals you could use to knock them down, or ...


3

Depends to some extent which grade of redwood you bought - heart redwood is the most resistant to rot and mould, and I'm assuming the wood you've used has been cured (not green wood). I can see why you're confused - it seems you can, if you want to, varnish the wood, but this isn't essential, though an excessive number of knots might mean you'd be better off ...


3

You don't say where you are in the world, and that's a consideration when trying to give a sensible answer. That said, if its Box Tree Caterpillar, you should have noticed plenty of webbing over the plants, but you haven't mentioned this feature at all. There is treatment for Box Tree Caterpillar, but its true to say it's an ongoing battle, and it sounds ...


2

Early winter in your place is a very good time. It will ensure the plant has 3-4 months to adapt to its new soil conditions without suffering drought. In Europe it is recommended to transplant trees and bushes in November, because it avoid droughts and deep earth-freeze that could damage the roots. With the temperature you tell us, it appears there is no ...


2

One of the great things about boxwood is that you can prune them hard and they will come back from old wood. Probably the burning was caused by pruning late in the season which caused a flush of weak growth which was nipped by cold wind. Dead foliage tends to hang in the shrub, so for sightliness' sake prune out the dead, cutting back to live wood. Do it in ...


2

Boxwoods will grow best if they are not being brushed past constantly while trying to grow. The safest minimum planting distance will be centered in the middle of the bed. This will leave a 3" buffer space at the base of the mature plant on both sides. Green Tower boxwoods do not have a huge root system, but to be on the safe side, you can take a square ...


2

The Green Tower Boxwood sounds like a good choice. Make sure that there isn't a layer of concrete below the soil. Lots of contractors dump concrete out close to projects and beside a stairwell I'd be suspicious (if I am reading you correctly.) You need to double dig that soil anyway...if there is concrete and it is blocking the drainage I'd try punching ...


1

Looks like rust fungus. Cut off the ickys and spray the rest with mixture (google that) and if you cut it back it will grow back free of fungus..water and fungus are friends but dont despair it spreads on the wind...happens to the best of us... careful not to use blower and spread to other plants. Not a terminal illness if you cut off the discolored parts.


1

Ilex crenata? Any other varietal name attached? If I do my metric calculations this is 6 inches by 12 inches high? Way too small for height. I would make the height at least 2 1/2 feet by 2 1/2 feet wide. You are probably looking at 1 gallon baby plants. Plant 1 1/2 feet apart and at least 1 1/2 feet from the edge of the walk. Dig up the soil and turn ...


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