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5

I can't think of any easy solution to this problem - what you're doing already, that is, trenching and keeping the trench clear, is probably the best idea. Laying lime and adding sand on top just means the sand will blow everywhere if you use any kind of hover mower, and you'd have to very carefully collect any clippings off the top of that loose sand ...


5

After all green growth on your bulbs has completely disappeared, you can spray the weeds and grass with glyphosate. I say glyphosate deliberately rather than Round Up - Round Up contains other ingredients which make it more dangerous in the environment, but you can buy a bottle of neat glyphosate from somewhere like Wilkos fairly cheaply, and mix it yourself,...


4

Highbush blueberries or highbush cranberries both come to mind, and also make fruit you can use in various ways. If you're up to the initial work and long-term maintenance pruning, espaliered or cordoned peaches, plums, apricots, cherries or dwarf apples. Place some scaffold wires for those. Rosa Rugosa will provide a nice harvest of hips and can grow to ...


4

You can use metal edging which is supposed to resist frost heave. Steel rusts into a nice patina look, but will last about 40 years. Then you can look at doing it again. Aluminum doesn't rust but is not as strong if you know you're going to ding it now and then.


3

I cannot recommend strongly enough that you NOT use roll edging. You will never be able to get a good look with it because it "memorizes" its original rolled up shape and kinks badly (even on curves), you can never get straight lines (due to kinking), it has horrible (or non-existent) stakes, and many brands are at most 3" thick when they should be at least ...


3

I'll take them in order then A. caeruleum isn't hardy - you'll need to pot them and keep somewhere frost free over winter. A. neopolitanum (wild garlic) is highly invasive, and unless you're going to eat lots of it, I wouldn't recommend planting in the garden. ( I speak as someone who has spent over 20 years trying to eradicate the stuff from 2 different ...


3

I have dug trenches everywhere between the edges of the landscape beds/walks and the lawn. This does get tedious, but next time I am going to dig a trench deep enough to lay down galvanised square gutter to keep the edges. Then I will fill the gutter with stones to weigh it down and provide an edging that I can easily maintain.


3

Well, Ecnerwal's suggestion is GORGEOUS and very very needy of a full time gardener. But this should show you there are many ideas for a 3' space to make privacy. 25' at 3' width gives you quite a bit of room. I would definitely be thinking of at least 2 or 3 different species at different height that love the same type of soil. Amelanchier is one of ...


3

I'd recommend Amelanchier lamarckii, and I chose that variety because it reliably produces good autumn colours, usually bright red, before the leaves fall. Has blossom in spring, green leaves all summer, fruits (inedible) followed by fall colours, and the multi stemmed nature of these shrubby trees is attractive in winter, with a reasonably interesting bark. ...


2

What an excellent and exciting idea. I tend to use this as a plant in areas with poor soil, or naturized garden look. It prefers acidic soil, and if cared for by you might grow to 3 or 4 feet. Here is a link for propagating it, not that you want to do that, but it talks about its needs and idiosyncrasies, see Propagating Sweet Fern. Plus there is a nice ...


2

IMPE, the way to have a 2" above the ground border that stays put is to have 8-10 inches of border, most of which is buried. Ideally you'd take it all the way below frostline, but that's VERY impractical where I have and do live (48" or so.) To do that with your edging stones that are only 4" tall, I guess you could pour a concrete foundation and mortar ...


2

The chemicals used on pressure treated timber have not been toxic to any significant degree since new regulations came into force in 2003. However if there is likely to be regular human contact with the timber (e.g. walking on timber decking in bare feet), it is recommended to apply a sealant to avoid direct skin contact with the chemicals. Whether you ...


2

Hmmm... so since these bare trunked trees are deciduous conifers they are likely bald-cypress. This tree can go to over 100 feet tall when given room, but close planted here they will continue to do exactly what you don't want, lose lower branches. These trees were clearly the wrong species to plant in that location; perhaps they were a low cost alternative ...


2

The trouble is, when you dig over soil to prepare for planting, there will inevitably be weed seeds in it, and those will germinate and grow now they've been brought nearer the surface, and through the bark. This assumes you dug out any obvious weeds and their roots prior to planting the bed. The only way to stop those coming through is to use a membrane and ...


1

It will probably work in the short term, but the problems are Crates like this are usually made from poor quality wood which soon rots. To prevent rotting or insect damage in hot climates, the wood may have been treated with chemicals that harm plants. The pieces of wood may be small, so the finished structure may look untidy because of all the joints. The ...


1

I love Bamboo's answer. Just wanted to add this link I found...THIS is the only thing I have used or will use for edging between plant beds and lawns. A little trench. There is nothing better. Your little plants are not happy mainly because of the bark. That stuff is NEWLY dead? Everything that dies has to decompose. The very next thing that happens ...


1

To use PVC pipe, you can bend it to the shape you want with a PVC Pipe Bender which consists of a heater of some sort which makes the pipe flexible. I have a small electic sleeve which I slip over the PVC. With this you can bend the pipe around a jig so you get the same shape every time. Let it cool and there you go. When I've used this sort of thing I ...


1

Most people appear to use metal electrical conduit for loop houses, and this can be purchased in most major home improvement stores. To bend it to the right curvature, you can purchase pipe benders on Amazon or other major online retailer. They're a system of clamps and you can use the length of the pipe to obtain the necessary leverage to bend the conduit....


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