7

Based on the pictures at this website and some general knowledge of my own what you have is a blackberry. Blackberries are shiny fruits with large cells and a white core just like the picture you show. By comparison, black raspberries are less shiny with smaller cells and, when fully ripe. come off the plant hollow inside, giving them another common name of '...


7

Full sun - most vegetables like as much sun as possible, although in very, very hot countries, some shade from the midday sun may be beneficial.The berries falling doesn't matter either way, but they'll be a pain to pick up.


7

If we're talking about commonly referred to Rubus, most plants in the genus can be propagated 3 ways, by cuttings, by sectioning off suckers - the easiest if there are suckers present already, or by tip layering - burying the tip of a stem a few inches below ground to encourage the plant to produce a sucker.


7

The likelihood of disease is not more likely when planted in close quarters, but if one species contracts a disease, it will likely pass it on. To avoid this, planting them apart should do it, anywhere that no blown leaves/running soil will reach them. Now I don't worry about it myself, I put everything together. Disease control in untreatable diseases ...


7

There are two dangers with blackberries: Suckers Seeds I have tons of wild blackberries; it must be some kind of sick contest between them and the ragweed as to which is the top weed here. I don't know that much about cultivated blackberries, but I believe have seen "non suckering" advertised as a feature of some cultivars. They'll apparently grow ...


7

I am zone USDA zone 3 b to 4 and you can't kill blackberry plants. I have mine growing with morning sun in a raised bed beside a concrete foundation. Every year, dead to the ground, every year eight to nine feet tall in the autumn. Don't bother with any extra work, cut them back to the ground in the fall and stand back in the spring. I do top dress with ...


6

I've never trellised my berries, personally. I've thought of doing it, but never quite get around to it. If you don't trellis blackberries and raspberries, they kind of sprawl all over and spread to make a thicket in whatever area you are willing to give them. It can make it more difficult (and painful) to pick, but isn't a problem otherwise. I just put on ...


6

When you plant them, be sure that they are no deeper than they were before. Use a porous, well drained potting mix, and water deeply. The blackberry is going to need a trellis, as well as the raspberry. You should use no less than 25 gallons of soil for each plant in the permanent container, but you can gradually get there if you want, by repotting into a ...


5

From what I can see, you appear to have only one bush, with blackberries in various stages of their life. A similar picture can be found here, along with some good information about the plant. The berries are a yellowish white initially, and, as they ripen, turn first red, then black. The red berries are fine to eat but quite tart, whereas the mature fruit ...


5

Usually, bare root plants are supplied with wrapped roots - that might be burlap or fabric or some plastic, so hopefully that's what they've done. When you get them, soak the roots in a bucket of water for at least 2 hours, then plant out. If its a good supplier, they may come with instructions, and these often tell you how long to stand them in water for. ...


5

It may have been caused by drifting of sulphur based fungicide. You said you may have treated your nectarine tree, which is ten yards away. This easily could have affected the flavor of the blackberry leaves. Especially as they have lots of flat area, and hardly any mass, it would be much more noticeable on the leaves than the berries.


5

Probably you happen to be seeing mostly (likely due to locale) the output of one breeding program and that is their theme. Looking here, page 24 to 26, that would appear to be Arkansas; and many more names other than Triple Crown (from Maryland) that are not in that theme show up. Illini, (guess where that's from) Thornfree, Doyle Thornless, Black Satin, ...


5

It will probably depend on the particular cultivar. Wild blackberries are extremely productive in spreading. I live on an Island nearly coated with blackberry. They seem impervious to mowing, burning and chemicals: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7434.html#MANAGEMENT So, that doesn't bode well. :/ One recommendation from the site above is ...


5

The standard advice for checking on a cutting is to tug gently on it and see if it resists being pulled from the soil. If it doesn't come right up, then it has likely rooted. In this case, if these tip layers have been potted over the winter and are now putting out leaves, I think it is pretty safe to say that they have enough roots to survive. What you ...


5

I never mulched reds, yellows or blacks in the Chicago area. The only problem was the rabbits ate them when there was snow cover on the ground.


5

The “different” plant is a hitchhiker, either from some random seed or already brought in with the blackberry from the nursery. Without further ado, I recommend you pull it out. It will compete with the blackberry for nutrition and space and the priority should be the wanted plant over the unwanted one. Once the blackberry is well established and either ...


4

No, no, no. Don't spray to test for problems. That isn't a fungus...probably sunburn. You have to know the insect or bacteria or fungus before you decide to spray. Get rid of the chunky non-decomposed mulch. Slugs, decomposers, love that environment and you will need more nitrogen to satisfy the decomposers and your plant. Did you test your soils pH? ...


4

Supposing it's just a few of the larger leaves, I wouldn't be too concerned. In fact, there are some seasons when my raspberry bush will grow clusters of purple leaves or tint some of the newer-growth leaves a dark-red. I've been told that it can be attributed to a) nutrient deficiencies (typically of phosphorous, magnesium, or iron) or b) changes in ...


4

Frankly, I don't agree with the premise that blackberries and raspberries planted together are more subject to disease. I've worked in many gardens where blackberries are trained up a trellis or fence (being large, trailing plants), with raspberry bushes 3-5 feet in front, in the same bed. The only drawback with it is that raspberries tend to spread by ...


4

It's because when they dig the plant, the dirty ragged cut the digger leaves on the roots is left when the plant goes to storage. The roots on your plant used to be a lot longer, but (of course) when they were dug, the roots had to be cut. That's why trimming off the last 1/2 - 1 inches of root can be good for the plant, sort of like trimming dead/ragged ...


4

I have no idea, never heard of it, usually the only time you need to trim roots is if they are damaged, when you may take off those parts affected. It is, though, common to be advised to prune back the canes (topgrowth) to 6-8 inches if this has not been done prior to despatch. I certainly wouldn't advise cutting back roots for plants which are going to be ...


4

I discourage the idea. The moment a cane's tip touches the ground, the plant is seriously tempted to grow roots. Plus, the canes bend easily while young, once they mature, they tend to break or get otherwise damaged. So while you can easily bend them down now, it might be not so easy to get them bach up again. Note that many gardeners see at least their ...


4

I suspect a language problem: Blackberries (Rubus) are “mûre” in French, “mora” in Spanish and “amora” in Portuguese. -> which may easily be confused with Morus, the Genus of mulberries. But of course some prankster may have switched the labels, who knows? In any case, your plant looks indeed like a blackberry.


3

You can plant them when it's still frosting out, but not when it's still freezing regularly. Until then, keep them in the coolest, darkest spot you have inside. An unheated basement or garage is perfect. A large shed should work too, if not too drafty. If it's too warm, they will put out shoots and start growing, which isn't fatal, but can cause severe ...


3

I think a raised bed, if you can irrigate it, should be safe right up to the driveway. It's a light colored drive, which will warm up, but not near to the extent that blacktop will, and it has the benefit of reflecting light onto the undersides of leaves. Leaves have more concentrated chlorophyll above than below, but the undersides are still capable of ...


3

Plan how you're going to support and train your plant before you put it in the ground - it will need something in place to be tied/trained on. Second, no, don't tilt it in the ground, it's not necessary and will mean some of the rootball might be above soil level. Just plant it at the same height it is now - you can either just nip out the top of that cane, ...


3

Depends on where you live... where I live, it is too dry for them to be too dangerous... and the varieties that I have tried to grow for the last 2 years haven't done much yet. I dug up about 40 Raspberry canes this spring and not one had major roots further down than 4-5 inches, so I wouldn't worry about trying to confine them if you have them in a raised ...


3

In my experience (of cutting down huge masses of brambles on my allotment) they don't grow from cut stems lying on the ground. They will root from vines rambling across the ground so if the live plants are nearby, you could try training/stretching a vine to the appropriate area and then pinning it to the ground. Alternatively you could dig up some of the ...


2

I think it depends a lot on your climate and soil. If you live somewhere temperate like near the coast in Washington where blackberries commonly grow wild, I'm guessing they'll grow like weeds right away. I could be wrong about them growing like weeds right away in those areas, but that's the impression I get. In my garden, which has a more clay-type soil, ...


2

Blackberry seeds need to be scarified and stratified in order to germinate. Furthermore, it seems that drying the seeds first may induce dormancy inhibiting germination. So, maybe you went wrong in one of the above procedures? http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/30/1/124.full.pdf


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