Hot answers tagged

13

Wow lucky you -- To have pheasants in your yard! Full disclosure - I have never had pheasants in my yard, so I have absolutely no experience with them, but I am so envious of your good fortune that I looked it up. According to https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ring-necked_Pheasantlifehistory pheasants are omnivores and : "In fall and winter, Ring-...


11

Your best bet is probably to pour boiling water on the weeds. The heat will kill the plants, and the water will of course be harmless to the birds as soon as it cools. Just be careful not to burn yourself!


8

Since woodpeckers don't eat wood, concentrate on killing the insects that the woodpeckers are actually eating (rather than "keeping the woodpeckers away" by some means other than removing their food source.) Though if the tree is as described, I'd also suggest taking scions to graft to new rootstocks as it may be in serious trouble and at least that way you'...


8

I'm not an ornithologist, but I think you are over-engineering. If you like magnolia, plant one. Various birds will use it to rest and as observation point to catch insects. Keep the garden most diverse as possible, so you will have more birds. If you go only for the plants you cited, you will get just berry eaters. You should instead attract also ...


7

These birds live as wild birds in my area. The people around complain only that during hot dry summers they tend to destroy their tomatoes (desperately searching for liquid). They also like to spend time under juniperus bushes, and from time to time they surprise and scare the owners when they take off out of these juniperuses. Otherwise, gorgeous birds. If ...


6

Several possible problems come to mind. Firstly it could be a compatibility problem. Most sunflower varieties are, to some extent, self fertile. That is, they can produce viable seed even in a planting of only one variety. However, they will generally produce better if more than one variety is present. It could be a problem with pollination. Sunflowers are ...


5

There is some good advice from the previous posters. However, it sounds to me that you could be dealing with a sapsucker, which is a type of woodpecker. As Ecnerwal pointed out, it can be a bit of a bad sign if a woodpecker is drilling into your tree to get insects. That means your tree is likely infested with some sort of boring beetle, termite etc. and ...


5

I diverted the birds from my blueberries by placing them next to my cornus kousa tree which kept them fed. That fruit was much bigger then my berries. Otherwise there's no realistic option other than building a cage and stringing bird netting over it.


5

Watch your earliest NATIVE blooming plants that are nectar sources for hummingbirds. When they start to bloom, hummers are following right behind... In central Virginia you keep your eyes open for red buckeye blossoms.


5

Birds are no different than other animals. They look for food, water and shelter. If all you have is food in the form of fruit then you will get birds dropping in for breakfast or a snack before bed. Usually with fruit trees and homeowners the methods to keep the harvest are to: plant trees on dwarf root stock and prune to keep small. Then you can harvest ...


5

Are they "pecking" the tree trunk, or just roosting, hanging around and eating from the bird feeder? If they are spending time actually pecking holes in the trunk, then yes, most likely you have some sort of bug at work under the bark. Look for rows of holes in the side of the tree, and if you find any, check with your local Ag extension or a good nursery ...


5

One screw wont hurt the tree. Just be sure to use a stainless steel screw so it doesn't rust out and break off in the tree.


4

There isn't much you can do to prevent them flying into your yard. anything that keeps them away will usually scare off the birds you want, as well. About them eating your berries, that can be an issue. The thing that worked best for me was bird netting over a hoop frame. It's some work, but it looks better and is easier to get into than laying the mesh ...


4

Use a migration map of real sightings: http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html


4

If you are willing to commit to throwing away the sugar-water before it turns funky and cleaning the feeder, you can start as early as you like, and be there for them when they show up. But it probably won't be until the flowers start to bloom. If you require enough hummer traffic to move the sugar-solution through to remind you to clean it, wait for the ...


4

I've never tried it myself, but they say you can paint strawberry sized rocks read and set them near the strawberry plants, the birds come in to try and eat them and find out they're no good. Then they avoid them for the rest of the season. I would try this with the blueberries. Before they're ripe, hang some blue beads or something they wouldn't like in ...


4

They make tools for just this purpose with the slightly-rude sounding name of "Crack Weeder". They are either a very narrow hoe / knife, or a metal-bristled brush. Using one of these is less tedious than hands-and-knees pulling of the little weeds. For expensive and high quality tools see http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/page.aspx?cat=2,2300&p=33275 - ...


4

I just covered my tomatoes with bird netting. It doesn't look pretty, but it protects the plants. Depending on how big the fig tree is, this could be a working solution. If you need to make a larger net, you could try joining two nets together using zip ties and overlapping a foot or so.


4

It is very difficult. Crows are one of the most intelligent birds, they recognize you, they understand what you are doing. So they will learn quick about your methods. a lot quicker then other birds. From my experience, they are not so competitive other other birds, i.e. they eat different things. Woodpeckers and black birds have no problems with crows, and ...


4

Do both plants! I simply adore this idea! I'd also cover the pile before planting the vines with a chunk of wire fencing that has holes big enough only for the sparrows and finch that would keep out bigger birds like owls, ravens, crows and cats and dogs. I think chicken wire would work well and it is very inexpensive and very flexible. Prop and dome ...


4

One option might be to use a feeder cage. This will prevent larger birds from being able to get at the feeder, so should stop parakeets from being able to feed, but but the side effect that it will also prevent some other birds


4

If you want to build a Stork nest, you have to take a few things into consideration. Do Storks live in your area? Are there enough food and resources in the neighborhood? Is it possible to build a nest where the birds can freely fly into? No obstacles? The nest is usually build on a pole of 4-6 meters, depending on obstacles in vicinity. I have seen nests ...


4

It's likely to be painful if a walnut falls on you, and if you're asleep, you won't be able to avoid them. So, a reasonable suggestion to not sleep under a walnut tree. As for a bird house as long as it's got a roof that will protect any chicks I don't see an issue apart from being struck in flight. Walnuts are also listed as bird healthy


4

Since you're concerned about the potential toxicity of the prunus padus to birds, I'll address that. The fruit from the tree is not only safe for birds, but is actually a healthy part of their diet. It supplies them with needed vitamins and nutrients. Sources generally agree that, even though they're edible, the seeds are undigestible for birds. Therefore, ...


4

Wow, that little guy is hard to photograph, isn't he? I don't think it is a hummingbird though. It looks like an insect to me. A gigantic one. In the next-to-last of your 7 photos (i.e. #6) you can see his tubular "sippy-tongue" poking into one of the flowers ... unless it is a shadow from one of his feelers. But Hummingbirds don't have tube-tongues or ...


3

I have a propane weed torch that I use to burn the weeds in cement cracks. I got mine from a gardening supply store, but they are on Amazon. I can't use it near the house or the porch screen (plastic screen), but it works pretty good on driveways and cracks. You may have to revisit the weed area about every month or so. Just be sure to inspect all of the ...


3

If you want a viable low maintenance solution you should consider removing the bricks/tiles and replacing any soil with underneath or in between the bricks/tiles with crushed rock. You can usually buy it cheap in quantity if you have a quarry nearby. If you don't want to dissemble the patio you can try to scrape out as much dirt as you can from between the ...


3

Woodpeckers are crazy birds. Often on summer mornings they will wake me up with their hammering on a nearby tin roof. Now why would a woodpecker be hammering on a tin roof, I ask you? Maybe they think it sounds harmonic. Maybe they like the feel of it, or perhaps they think they see grubs moving about in the wood it is nailed to, or even woodpecker dental ...


3

I'm extremely doubtful that there is ANY food source for birds (other than sugar-water for hummingbirds, so far anyway) that squirrels won't adapt to exploiting. You can have a fine old time trying to squirrel-proof your feeder, and then step back and see what the squirrels think up to bypass it. If you can move past being irritated by it you can be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible