16

Green peppers are not ripe. Even if the seeds are viable (immature pepper seeds can be grown if planted soon after harvesting, but don't have the food storage for long storage), if the pepper is green, it's not ripe. They can ripen to a lot of colors, but the most common is red (for varieties sold for green use). Some varieties were bred to remain green for ...


11

I'm revising my answer again, but this time with an opinion based on my observations of peppers (not bell types specifically): My opinion is that they'll continue to live as long as they're healthy and pruned. If they're in a small container and not pruned, they might die after they produce ripe fruit the first or second time, but if you prune them ...


9

Usually bell peppers ripen red, orange, yellow or less commonly, brown. Most green peppers that you eat are actually unripe ones that ripen to other colors. Some peppers ripen green, but that is rare. To quote farmerdill on gardenweb, "Just after WW II several green when ripe varieties were introduced to extend the market window." The two green-when-ripe ...


8

For what it's worth we have a local greenhouse that grows bell peppers and tomatoes year round. They use plants for 2 years. I think they trash them after that because the amount of woody stems starts to get out of hand. Since an individual grower isn't as concerned about production per square foot, you can probably extend this by at least another year. ...


7

It looks like it could be Sun scalding to me. I have seen it on one of my chili peppers as well. Sunscald on peppers occurs in the high heat of summer when humidity is at a peak. Usually the foliage on the pepper plant will help shield it from the most intense rays of the sun but, in some cases, the leaves have defoliated partially due to insects or ...


7

Sun is essential for full ripening and flavour; though they can be picked and ripened separately, they will be sweeter if left to ripen on the plant. Watering should be sufficient and frequent enough to keep the plant well supplied, but without leaving it waterlogged. You've not said whether your plant is in the ground or in a pot, but if it's in a pot, ...


6

The first and the last pictures look like Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV). The mottling looks like it matches. The others, I'm not sure, but they could just need more of the right nutrients, and they may have a fungal infection. It may be too early to tell for sure what's wrong with those. I don't know if they also have a virus. Alternately, it could be Tomato ...


6

Will the pepper grow back? Not exactly. However, after you harvest the pepper the plant likely will produce more flowers, which can be pollinated and grow into more peppers.


5

No, it will not grow back. The pepper is the result of a pollinated flower, as is a peach, an apple, a tomato, etc. However, save some of the seeds inside the pepper and you can plant them to have a new plant that will flower and will produce more bell peppers once they are pollinated by your local flying insect helper (e.g., a bee). Since you have a ...


5

What's on the fruit certainly does look like sun scald, but I wouldn't expect drooping leaves in association with that unless your watering hasn't been sufficient, so not entirely sure that's the only thing going on here. I followed your link to the compost - that product isn't really suitable for adding to pots, its intended for use in open ground, where ...


5

A nitrogen deficiency can be indicated by the yellowing of older leaves because nitrogen is mobile in the plant. A sulfur deficiency can be indicated by the yellowing of newer leaves because sulfur is immobile in the plant. The two elements most likely to be leached from soil by excess water is N and S because of the negative charge they have, NO3- and SO4-...


5

There is a chance; I've had worse happen to things I've started which went on to flourish, though not bell-peppers specifically.


5

If you bought these plants this year, even though they're growing in close proximity, and even if the Reaper pollinates a bell pepper, it won't affect the plants or fruits - it only affects the seeds within, which will now be some sort of cross between the peppers if you grow from them next year. If, though, you grew these yourself from seeds you saved, and ...


5

The biggest cause of blossom end rot is not, in fact, calcium shortage in the soil - it's erratic watering. If the plant can't take up enough water for its needs regularly, it also cannot take up the calcium it needs. The weather cycle you describe is perfect for blossom end rot, if you didn't supplement sufficiently well with water when it was very hot and ...


5

It's Parasola plicatilis, previously known as Coprinus, common name pleated inkcap. These are delicate mushrooms with a short lifespan of 24-72 hours - nothing much to worry about, they are saprobic, a decomposer mushroom usually found in grassy areas or sometimes forest edges, but there is some suggestion they might possibly have psychoactive properties. ...


4

If the holes are round, it may be flea beetles. If the holes are irregular (and still in the middle of the leaf) it could be caterpillars. You have to send pictures. If the holes are round and cross-over the veins, it could be leaf-spot, a fungus. Happening overnight rules out leaf-spot, I think. Normally, this is nothing to worry about. It is, ...


4

I've seen your other question regarding your tomato plants too (they appear to be suffering attack from a leaf mining insect). Ants don't eat plants - they may crop bits of leaf for nest building and the like, but usually, if ants are present on plants, there's some other insect producing honeydew, and that's what the ants want. Insect infestations which ...


4

This might sound strange considering the location of the tan color, but I've heard that blossom end rot can cause that in peppers. I had sunscald and something that looked like your pepper's condition on a lot of peppers in 2016, and they seemed to be different conditions than each other whether or not the latter were really a weird kind of blossom end rot. ...


4

Mine has produced for 2 years and I'm questioning if it's going to make it for 3, carrying it through the winter in a homemade growth chamber where it loses most of its leaves. The 2nd year was more productive than the first, and now the lower portion of the stalk looks more like a tree with arthritis than a pepper.


4

Yes that is exactly what is occuring. I suggest you cleanse your soil with a little diluted dawn dish soap (antibacterial). After this, crumple down or blend egg shells nice and finely. Lay them atop of the soil directly at the base of the plants. Add about a shot of milk to your soil as well, only once. Make sure your soil is not overly supple to water ...


4

Insufficient light looks to have been an issue for the plant because it is etiolated, but quite possibly the main problem was lack of pollination. Peppers are self pollinating, but they need moving air, like a breeze or wind around them for that to work, so hand pollination is safest in these circumstances. I can't tell what size the pot is, though it does ...


4

Look like coles - cabbage, kohlrabi, broccoli ,brussel sprouts, kale, etc.They need to grow before I could tell them apart; maybe another answer will be more definite.


3

Looks like deer due to the height of the marks, rough broad marks (deer sort of rip the leaf) on the leaf. More leaves on the bottom of the plant indicates its not a shorter animal like rodents, groundhog. Image from http://cultivatorscorner.com/garden-pests-deer


3

I bet its some sort of groundhog / gopher or other type of garden rodent pest. Without visible bite/teeth marks it is hard to say for certain, but I had pepper plants and they ate them up first. Pretty much avoided my tomatoes though.


3

My sweet red bell pepper plant is almost through its second summer. It's in a pot, so I brought it in last year and stuck it in a window and watered it daily all winter. It stopped producing around November and suffered a serious aphid and spider mite infestation all winter because I didn't clean it before bringing it in. In February, the height of our ...


3

I am entering my 6th winter with my habanero plant. I set it out on my deck from end of April until first frost. I haven't had any luck with bell or pablanos. I live in Indiana


3

Okay, so they're sweet peppers - the first thing I'd say is, there's too many plants in one box - that number of plants should be split between two boxes of that size as a minimum. Second, the leaves on the plants in the second photo don't appear to be twisted or affected, only the ones you show separated from the plants in the first pic. Did these ...


3

Bell peppers in my funky hoop house greenhouse (dangit, I don't remember the names of the peppers - but some common things (one green, one purple, one yellow) that were available at a nursery in coastal northern California) produced wonderfully their second summer. During the intervening winter they made lots of seedless flat small peppers. This is their ...


3

I grow outside hydropnically. and after a couple of years they start to look like small trees. If it freezes I bring them in. Going on 3 years. Green pepper, jalapno, serrano, and poblamo. Peppers year round. Houston. Determinate is for canning. The fruit ripens at the same time. Indeterminate ripens different times throughout the year.


3

Any little insect nibble, injury will cause this deformity. There is NOTHING wrong with your pepper that I can see. Completely normal. What are you fertilizing it with, what are your watering procedures, where is this plant? Indoors, outdoors? Is it flowering? What kind of soil is this plant living in? Went back to reread your question! Exactly what ...


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