5

A full-sized beet is about 2-3" in diameter. Generally, the top of the root is visible above the soil, and you can guesstimate the root's size based on what you can see. It is OK to pick them smaller, too - some people prefer 'baby beets' to full sized ones. I wouldn't let them grow much larger than 3", though, unless you are growing a variety that is ...


4

Any chance slugs ate them ? What you can try is plant some of the seeds you got in for example clumps of 4 in the module trays and then transplant outside when they are big enough this is the safest bet to avoid slugs and you will confirm at the same time if problem is not with the seeds you bought.


3

In addition to the great response from @michelle, if you planted these from seeds or bought them in the store, they typically have a harvest time on them. That along with the tips from @michelle is a good way to make sure you don't leave them in the ground for too long. A good practice I learnt was to put a tag next to the plant with the name of the ...


3

Looks like rabbits to me. Where is it you live? What animals have you observed? This is how rabbits eat; they leave the tougher main vein and eat the leaf completely. PNW is famous for slugs. Surely you are able to recognize a slug slime trail? Were there any slime trails? I see bunnies snacking. We have wild bunnies that are easy to keep out of the ...


3

I've had both beets and chard naturalize in my garden, and the resulting hybrid is always more chard-like than beet-like. The chard grows like a weed, and is hard to stamp out, but the beet is more delicate. When I collect seeds from beet varietals that I have planted from bought seed that season, the seed always produces a more chard-like plant -- long ...


3

Although both sugar beet and bulls blood beet are varieties of Beta vulgaris, the point is that you're intending to grow your bulls blood variety as a microgreen - the growing method for that is nothing like growing full sized beets in the ground, so no, the post you read isn't relevant to what you want to do. You want to use the green tops rather than ...


3

I think its too late to eat them - they're on their way to flowering, which is what they do in their second year, using the 'beet' or storage organ at the base to grow on in this way. They should produce seed, so if you want to collect that and grow from it, then leave them in. Otherwise, dig 'em up and see if there's anything you can still use at the base - ...


3

So it turns out that I probably had a bad batch of seeds. After replanting from a new seed packet, under essentially the same conditions, I have some thriving carrots!


2

Leaf miners for sure, 100%. If you feed your beets well with good quality fertilizer they can outgrow miners and have an awesome crop still, of both leaves and roots. Liquid seaweed, compost tea, a good all purpose fertilizer, ect or any combo of the above can work.


2

Beets are relatively unharmed by bugs and disease. It could be linked with overwatering them: they grow too quick for the available minerals. From the research I did, this is called Brown beets problem. SOLUTION: add Boron The only problem they have is a lack of boron. Buy some Borax and dust it over the soil. (Borax kills fungus; is to be found in the ...


2

The pictures show that there is not enough water. You can see cracks in the soil all near the plant. 10 minutes a day 3 times a week is not enough on a dripper system. Most drippers are 0.5-2 Gallons per hour. That comes out to be about 1/6 of a gallon 3 times a week = 1/2 a gallon per week. That is a very sad amount of water. On top of that drippers ...


2

I use often my seeds, and usually you get good results. The specific characteristic are maintained. Just that you bought a certain variety and you will get possibly an other form. I found that usually they tend to the standard old varieties, but often you still see much of the original characteristic. Personally I never put all eggs in such seeds, but I ...


2

Using one's own seed from their vegetables will always be iffy. I don't know about chard and beets, I'd say that would be iffy and I'd go look up a lot more information. Doesn't affect the plant grown from the seed you planted. Seed in packets is grown in sterilized, air controlled rooms with positive pressure to keep the errant pollen out. Plants grown ...


1

Could be spinach leaf miners - they're a pest on beets as well. The blisters are caused by the tiny maggots inside the leaf, that's likely what the black bits are that you can see now you've popped a blister. There's no real solution other than trying to keep them out in the first place by using row covers or something similar - more info here http://www....


1

I have experienced similar problems before as well. I now use a seeding mix when I plan seeds directly in the ground. That seems to be working for me since this year I got both carrot and beet seeds to sprout from the ground.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible