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From my experience, you can and should remove those from avocado roots. I do not know what that is exactly but I observed that the more of those bumps appear on the roots, the slower the seed develops. If I remove it, the seed comes back to life. There is another thing I figured I need to watch out for, that slows down and eventually kills the seed - white ...


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No one's answered you and there are several things I can pass along since I'm a "master gardener" - though that doesn't apply as much here as my experience. I have grown avocado trees from pits successfully numerous times. What you're seeing here, in my opinion, is mold. I suspect you're exposing the pit to too much water. After removing all the ...


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Avocados are soft-leaved tropicals so they are very sensitive to water reserves. Any even brief interruption of sap to the leaves can result in some yellowing and browning and drying of leaves. Root interference as a result of repotting can be detrimental. Your plants look tall, and the one visible pot looks relatively small compared to the tree it is ...


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Avocado have shallow tap root and wide feeding roots near the surface from what I've learned so it's most likely in shock from your disturbing those feeding roots, they are very sensitive to changes and disturbance. You only want to water it when it dries out. If the soil is wet let it dry out before watering. The roots will search for water but overwatering ...


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This is not mould this is a plant living in water and the roots are calcifying and eating through these this will not harm your plant my brother has many of these and so do I not a worry if you actually look at some of the seeds they actually have a mould growing around there that's different to what is growing on the roots


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I've been told to not have a plate under the pot. The water needs to drain through. Local nursery will even slash the side of the plastic container to help the water drain. Currently 1 of my avocado trees are struggling because of too much water... In the summer I water then every day, winter same amount every 3 days and it was still struggling!!!! Usually ...


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If it was grown from seed or a pit, it can take 15 years before it bears fruit. Check out this article for more information, including a description of the odd pollination cycle described by Colin.


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Two things to keep in mind with avocados: they produce very variable seedlings from pits and they need well draining soil. From a recently purchased package of 6 avocados I put all 6 pits on the surface of soil in pots and one simply rotted and the other 5 split and produced roots and shoots. The heights of the stalks before producing leaves varied from 3 ...


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Well if that grey pot is the volume for the root ball you may be testing the capacity of the soil to hold water. The soil looks rather sandy on top, which might be good for drainage but not for holding water. Fast drainage is good for avocado, but watering every 9 days might not be sufficiently frequent, particularly as the plant gets bigger and it depends ...


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According to the US National Institutes of Health (not politicized yet, thankfully), perlite dust is NOT hazardous. Here is a great source for more information - the relevant information is in the Abstract. That being said, I have some bronchial issues of my own, so I wear a simple dust mask when working with perlite and soilless mix - I just don't like ...


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The drooping is probably a temporary response to the messing with the roots that you speak of. Avocado, unlike many tropical plants, generates large soft leaves that are able to transpire very rapidly. When losing moisture faster than it can be replaced the defensive action is to droop and thereby try to reduce water loss. The pot, even though it appears too ...


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